Flathead Electronic Tracking

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by pabloracer4748, Nov 27, 2009.

  1. pabloracer4748

    pabloracer4748 New Member

    Messages:
    283
    State:
    Kansas
    Ok, well here's the begining of my story. Every late spring early summer at a local lake, I hit a rocky flathead spawn site during prespawn and catch some Absolute Monsters. The fish are beautiful with a very dark almost black color out of this clear lake. The bite only lasts a week or two. I fish all year looking for these behemoths in summer, fall, winter, but have absolutely no luck. I've tried all I can think of to find them with no avail.:sad2:

    So for a couple years I've been thinking of how I can pin down the fishes location during different times of the year. Knowing that during winter and summer the big flatheads probably occupy territory that is somewhat close in distance to each other, being that it is not a huge lake.
    I had contacted some places regarding transmitters and recievers for fish tracking, to see if maybe they had a cheap system I could use to help me study these guys living quarters. But the quotes I recieved were in the many thousands of dollars and way more high tech than I felt I needed for my little study. After all, this is just for fun, and to get this curiosity off my mind that has been bothering me for so long.

    Well I think I may have found an interesting solution. There is a pet/child tracking device for a very reasonable price I found for sale called the Loc8tor. It is very simple and uses no gps or anything that I feel would be unnecasary. It can use up to 24 tags which are small at 1.2 x 0.8 x 0.3 inches and weight 0.175 Oz. They can be easily waterproofed and inserted into the fishes abdomen after a mild tranquilizer is used. Surgical thread would be disolved by the fish after incision, and cause no harm to the fish. It has a range of up to 600 feet and sends a signal to a hand held reciever guiding you to the location.

    Now there are some unknowns here, like will it still transmit a signal underwater, and how long will the batteries in the transmitters last.
    If needed I could add extra batteries. On one part of the site it says batteries last 90 days but in the faq it says "Battery life will depend on use. Using an example of one locate per day the expected Tag battery life is 9 months." So I'm not real sure if it will work but I'm sure gonna try. I will run some trials before I go through with the real deal though.

    I know it sounds pretty crazy, far fetched, and unlikely. Maybe even kinda cheating.
    But to me it sounds like a lot of fun, and a good way to learn. :big_smile:


    Here is a link to a website that sells the loc8tors
    http://www.diginetlink.com/Loc8tor_Plus_p/loc8-plus.htm
     
  2. I would love to also learn their movements and study them also. I always wanted to tag them somehow to see where they wind up, but I am sure it is illegal to do any of this.:sad2:
     

  3. pabloracer4748

    pabloracer4748 New Member

    Messages:
    283
    State:
    Kansas
    It might be illegal, I'm not sure. But I could've thrown them in my frying pan perfectly legally, So whats the difference.

    Anyways I'm not sure those transmitters will work underwater. That will be my main obstacle. I might have to find some other kind of tracking system. Dunno:confused2:

    I used to have an aqua view underwater camera, but whenever I switched the light on all the fish swam away. Kinda pointless.
     
  4. pabloracer4748

    pabloracer4748 New Member

    Messages:
    283
    State:
    Kansas
    woops
     
    Last edited: Nov 27, 2009
  5. Cryophilous

    Cryophilous New Member

    Messages:
    30
    State:
    Ohio
    Radio transmitters will typically work well through water, so that system, if properly done, should work. But I know that it is highly illegal to tag fish in public water Ohio. It has maximum penalties of hundreds of thousands of dollars in fines and jail time. Each state is different, but I would make sure that you wont be digging yourself a grave by doing this.
     
  6. rush_60

    rush_60 New Member

    Messages:
    1,719
    State:
    Troy, KS
    I know the guys that hunt coyotes with dogs use radio collars on their dogs so they can track them. I wonder if you could use a system like that?
     
  7. Shad Man

    Shad Man New Member

    Messages:
    785
    State:
    Tyler, TX
    Right on. Make sure your not getting yourself into trouble. Sounds like a cool idea.
    '
     
  8. GaryF

    GaryF New Member

    Messages:
    3,649
    State:
    O.P., KS
    Illegal? This question came up a few years back and we found something about marking or tagging wildlife being illegal, buried deep in the regs somewhere.

    But getting past that, it's an Interesting idea. Don't underestimate the technical challenges of tracking a fish underwater. Water is an attenuator, resulting in great signal loss, and I think you won't be able to overcome this with a small, low power radio transmitter. Maybe if a fish is shallow and you are very close by you could pick up something. I read a study on stripers below Keystone Lake in Oklahoma..... here it is..... they used ultrasonic transmitters - sound waves. They were recording fish as they passed certain points on the river, so range didn't have to be very far. Don't know what maximum range on something like that would be.
     
  9. GaryF

    GaryF New Member

    Messages:
    3,649
    State:
    O.P., KS
  10. pabloracer4748

    pabloracer4748 New Member

    Messages:
    283
    State:
    Kansas
    Thanks guys. I actually looked at the dog coller transmitters and they seem to bulky, but with actual gps I think they would work better. Im sure in the future they will have some smaller ones.