Flat Bank Sinkers vs. Regular Bank Sinkers

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by Mr.T, Sep 7, 2006.

  1. Mr.T

    Mr.T New Member

    Messages:
    2,553
    State:
    MO
    I see that Do-It has a mold for a "Flat" bank sinker

    http://www.do-itmolds.com/products/sinkermolds.php?category=flat_bank_sinker

    Has anyone made these sinkers?

    And how do they compare to the "regular" bank sinkers we're all familiar with, as far as their ability to hold the bottom in a strong current?

    I currently us 6 to 12 oz bank sinkers on the Missouri River but they all seem to roll a lot farther than I'd prefer.

    "No Roll" sinkers aren't an option right now because I don't use a traditional Carolina rig -- I use a dropper loop for my hook and a long tag line for the sinker, so I can keep the bait up off the bottom a foot or so.
     
  2. Doctor

    Doctor Member

    Messages:
    378
    State:
    Springfield, Ohio
    Mr T.

    Been using that style for several years they hit the bottom and lock down may get a little roll out of them if in high current and you throw the bait straight out the side of the boat but right behind the boat they will lock down solid, I use a carolina rig with a break away on the weight, take the weight and put a wire tie thru a bead then run the line thru the bead, if the sinker gets hung tug hard several times and the wire tie will break, drops the weight everything comes back to the boat grab a weight and a wire tie your back in business, but that style sinker doesn't get hung as bad as others using from 4oz. up to 8oz. if the current is really crankin we just double it up most I have had on is 20oz

    I made some over 4 years ago and just now starting to get on the low side and I fish some major snags on the Ohio River...............Doc
     

  3. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

    Messages:
    5,444
    State:
    Henderson,Ky
    I have a mold that makes the 3,4,5oz no-roll banks and the no-roll slips. They are simple to make and better that the regular bank and egg weights. You will need less weight with a flat sinker, they give no resistance in the water.
     
  4. dwreel

    dwreel New Member

    Messages:
    554
    State:
    Southern Pines, NC
    I don't fish rivers and any current I do fish is not a problem. I'm wondering what knot most of you use for the dropper loop? In the past i've used a surgeons knot or a plain overhand knot. BUT, i'm looseing too many rigs when I get hung. Thinking about changing to a dropper loop and a lighter line for the sinker. 3-way swivels are one possable chose but kinda expensive to be loseing when breaking off. So, I need a better dropper loop. Appreciate any help ya'll can send my way.
     
  5. crazy

    crazy New Member

    Messages:
    2,090
    State:
    Kansas CIty, MO
    Yeah I make those, 6oz and 8oz. They work much better then the bank sinkers flat vs. round. You deside what one would roll. Man carolina rig should always be an option. Just don't get stuck with one rig.
     
  6. laidbck111

    laidbck111 New Member

    Dick I use these and one more if I can find a pic of it. I tie all of mine by hand and would be more than happy to show you any knots I know. I may have a chance Monday to meet you somewhere and show you what little Iknow, Om me if interested.
    The Butterfly or Lineman's Loop

    [​IMG]
    An excellent easy to tie loop for applications needing a loop in another place than the rope-end, but somewhere in the middle. It has an excellent lead, and is secure even if the forces on both ends are stronger than the load in the loop.
    The Butterfly loop on the WEB.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    The Artillery Loop

    [​IMG]
    A practical and easy to tie loop for applications needing a loop in another place than the rope-end but somewhere in the middle. It is not as strong as the butterfly but is a bit faster to tie and untie. As the name already suggests it was used by the artillery (for carrying their guns over the shoulder.) Do not pull the rope too hard when the loop is not loaded. It is best used as temporary knot for carrying things. As always, work up the knot neatly!
    The Artillery loop on the WEB.
     
  7. Cattoo

    Cattoo New Member

    Messages:
    603
    State:
    caneyville,ky.
    i have 2 gripes with flat sinkers. the first one is, you cant cast them as far as bank sinkers. they flutter. and the other one is they do not drop fast enough because.....they flutter! hey, wait a minute, i only have one gripe! i'll stick with my bank sinkers. if your bank sinker is heavy enough, it aint gonna roll anyway.
     
  8. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    This is the river sinker, which is also flat, but rounded. May, and it is a "may", work better than the flat bank sinker.
     

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  9. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    Academy sells those round sinkers, they're called disk sinkers around here. The work well in current, lay flat on the bottom. I've not seen them n sizes larger than 3 oz.
     
  10. jdstraka

    jdstraka Well-Known Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    4,688
    State:
    Council Bluffs, Iowa
    Name:
    John
    Hi Jerry, Those Disk sinkers come larger than 3oz. I have some 4oz.5oz.and 6oz.They seem to work perty good but not in the main channel of the Missouri River that bad boy is moving around 7mph. with a big bait you have to move upin weight. I would like to try those flat bank sinkers Myself. Thanks J.D.
     
  11. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    No rivers the size of the Missouri in Texas, nor with that kind of current. I guess If I fished the MO, the Big Muddy, or Ohio rivers, i'd really have to upgrade my rods. Since I fish mostly lakes, more than a couple of ounces is usually overkill, except after a heavy rain, the lake I mainly fish has a strong current toward the dam after 3 or 4 inches in just a few hours.
     
  12. Mr.T

    Mr.T New Member

    Messages:
    2,553
    State:
    MO
    Thanks for all the replies. Guess I'll pick up a 6 & 8 oz flat bank sinker mold and see how it works out.
     
  13. fishhook

    fishhook New Member

    Messages:
    658
    State:
    Willow Woo
    I use this type sinker when fishing in the ohio river with a three way rig, works great.
     
  14. JAinSC

    JAinSC Active Member

    Messages:
    1,514
    State:
    South Carolina
    I guess I'll throw this out there again. Flat sinkers are not really meant to hold bottom cast accross the current. They may not roll, but they will still drag.

    For a sinker that will acutally hold in place, there are several types that are commonly used in surf fishing in salt water. The first few that come to mind are pyramid sinkers, storm sinkers, and grapnel sinkers. They are made to acutally grab the bottom and hold on. Any time I cast a bait accross (even quartering across) the current, I use a pyramid. A 3 or 4 ounce pyramid will hod even better than a 6 or 8 oz bank sinker, which will simply drag accross the bottom.

    I'd recommend that you pick up a few pyramid sinkers and give them a try.
     
  15. 4Low

    4Low New Member

    Messages:
    558
    State:
    Lonoke, AR
    Mr. T., I exclusively use the flat bank sinkers (6 & 8 oz) that I make myself. I usually fish in current with either rocky or sandy bottoms. I don't lose as many in the rocks with the flat banks, (and I'm guessing here) that their narrow width allows me to retrieve them easier when they slide down into the rocks. Also, on sandy bottoms, the regular bank sinkers keep right on rolling with the current while the flat banks hold a lot better. I use the "Do-It" mold and have had no problems with it, but it does take a long time for it to heat up. The first 3 or 4 pours don't produce much, so it takes a little time to get going. One helpful hint I learned last year---Get a cast iron ladel. It keeps the lead hotter longer, and you don't even need a glove to pour with.
     
  16. Mr.T

    Mr.T New Member

    Messages:
    2,553
    State:
    MO
    Just an update -- I finally got out with some of my newly-made flat bank sinkers and wasn't overly impressed. They didn't seem to hold the bottom any better than the regular bank sinkers. Of course, I was fishing in pretty good current on the Missouri River so that's probably part of it - I probably needed more like 10 to 12 ounces of weight in that current.

    I still believe they ought to work at least as good as regular bank sinkers so I'm going to keep using them (plus I've already sunk $60 in molds...)