Flagging Jugs Question?

Discussion in 'Alternative Methods of Catching Catfish' started by Bubbatn, Jun 2, 2008.

  1. Bubbatn

    Bubbatn New Member

    Messages:
    23
    State:
    Tennessee
    Ok, I've read as many "how-to's" as I can and got my plan worked out on how i'm gonna make them. Now my question is using them. With the flagging type, I'm kinda thinking these have to be set up anchored, correct? Also...When using live bait(bluegills), can the bluegills "jerk" them hard enough to "flag" the "jug"? Any tips here would be great. Thanks!
     
  2. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    The employment of the jugs depends entirely upon your state laws and personal preferences. Some states require the jugs to be anchored, some don't. As a sportsman, it is up to us as individuals to know and comply with our states regulations. As to bluegills flagging a jug, sure, they can do it if they are large enough or scared enough. But that is the least important feature of jug fishing... just wait until you start to reach for a flagged jug and have it suddenly start to run, or submerge in front of your face... that's not the bait. LOL If the gill flagged the jug and is still on your hook, simply reset the jug. You have to check each jug, flagged or not...them bait stealing turtles are pretty darn sneaky. Sometimes waves from passing boats will also flag a jug, floating or anchored. It is all a part of the sport.
     

  3. Bubbatn

    Bubbatn New Member

    Messages:
    23
    State:
    Tennessee
    Thanks, I just wasn't sure if it was "the norm" to use flagging jugs unanchored since I kinda pictured the weight (of the line, bait, and the weight on the end of the line to keep the bait down) being too much for it to keep it horizontal.
     
  4. kevhead56

    kevhead56 New Member

    Messages:
    62
    State:
    Greenfield, Il
    A 6-8 inch piece of rebar is quite a bit of weight. When you slide it to the top of the jug and lay the jug down, it takes a pretty good pull to tip the jug enought for the rebar to slide down. Try it in a pool or some standing water and see how much it takes to bring the jug to the flagged position. Your bait will probably not get the job done.:wink:
     
  5. Bubbatn

    Bubbatn New Member

    Messages:
    23
    State:
    Tennessee
    Thanks alot! That's kinda what I had planned as soon as I could find some rebar and get someone to cut it for me...haha. I'll be sure to post a report on my first "jug fishin" success. :big_smile:
     
  6. cod26

    cod26 New Member

    Messages:
    34
    State:
    Alabama
    as far as you rebar goes almost any home construction site will have it laying around and the builder will probably give it to you so they wont have to pick it up themselves, to cut it any angle grinder with a cutting wheel eill do the job
     
  7. justwannano

    justwannano Active Member

    Messages:
    1,003
    State:
    SE Iowa
    Rebar is pretty soft. You can cut it with a hacksaw.
     
  8. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    I would guess that 98% of my jugfishing is done in the river with freefloating jugs, rather than anchored jugs. I just seem to catch a whole lot more fish on freefloating jugs than I do on anchored jugs. Now, on my freefloating jugs I don't use live bait, because I've never had a flathead hit a bait that was floating down with the current. I use a 16p or 20p nail for a weight, which is enough to hold the line down, but isn't heavy enough to cause the jug to flag; also, nails are cheap, and don't hang up as easily as a regular sinker. Also, I can make up spare juglines ahead of time and wrap them around the nail for storage, so that when I have to break off a jugline that's gotten hung up on the bottom, I can quickly replace it. Now, my flagging jugs aren't made from pvc and rebar; they are made from 2-liter soda jugs with 2 or 3 ounces of gravel or scrap lead inside. So they will probably flag with less pull than the pvc type.
    If you anchor your jugs where there is considerable wave action, you may have trouble with the waves causing your jugs to flag. The jug will drift to the limit of the jugline, and when a good sized wave comes along, it can jerk the jug hard enough to make it flag.