Fishing the Big Black River!

Discussion in 'MISSISSIPPI RIVERS TALK' started by JHow, Apr 25, 2007.

  1. JHow

    JHow New Member

    Messages:
    28
    State:
    South East
    Can anyone thats fished the Big Black give me some insight?
    I already have a detailed post in the General Cat section, http://www.catfish1.com/forums/showthread.php?t=46795 but I'm lookin for someone who fishes these waters.

    what are some good baits? I'm guessing bream will be best, but I think I'll also bring along liver.

    What structures do you target? Log jams, lonely stumps, bends, sandbars etc

    How will the water level affect the fishing strategies? should I target deep spopts under certain conditions or timber in other conditions?

    any help would be:0a31:!
     
  2. coach

    coach New Member

    Messages:
    1,564
    State:
    Greenville , Ms
    my advice would be to send a pm to heavyduty ........... he fishes the big black a lot ............. he will give u all the advice u need ...................
     

  3. Pastor E

    Pastor E New Member

    Messages:
    3,194
    State:
    Beebe AR
    On the Big black one of the best baits are crayfish or shinners that you can catch on the river in the sand skoals in swift water like has been said on outside bends also a good place is of the steep sand banks there also is a lot of scour holes in the swift places good fishing Bro:big_smile:
     
  4. stillwater

    stillwater New Member

    Messages:
    4
    State:
    Mississippi
    Some of the best flatheads in the state are located between West and Durant in the Big Black. Have fished it lots of times but not in the last couple of years. Bluegills 3 to 4 inches, or maybe larger is what I have found to be best. The best locations are sandbars and above log jams. The biggest problem is low water levels and finding a place to put in since most of the river bank is private property. When the water is low you can't travel very far in a boat unless you get out and pull the boat behind you.
     
  5. JHow

    JHow New Member

    Messages:
    28
    State:
    South East
    I am now a believer about that. Check out my update on the thread in the link. I have a kayak, so low water doesn't bother me, but there were a few places where I wasn't sure if we would be able to get through. We'll be back soon with bigger, stronger hooks and more bait!
     
  6. solomon

    solomon New Member

    Messages:
    735
    State:
    MS
    Looks like you had a pretty good time. :smile2:
     
  7. stillwater

    stillwater New Member

    Messages:
    4
    State:
    Mississippi
    I got in on this too late and you're probably back from your trip. Hope you had good luck. A kayak is probably ideal for the Big Black. I fish it in a 16' canoe. An outboard is practically useless in low water. In the stretch of the river I spoke of (upstream from Durant)there are no shad. As a result, shad isn't a very good bait. We've used crawfish with good sucess, but caught a lot of Gaspergoos (drum). There are so many flatheads in the river I nearly always use live bait. Have caught some pretty good channel cat with chicken livers, but was always worried about the big shovel head that might be lurking there. If you can find some really big grasshoppers, you'll be surprised how good a bait they are in the Big Black. There is an abundance of leeches in the river that also make good bait. But medium to large sized Bluegills are probably number one.

    If it's deep enough to paddle, it just might be deep enough to fish. If you can find water that's 6 ft. deep, it'll probably be a good place. I have fished throwlines and trotlines with a Cajun friend who has a local reputation for catching lots of big catfish with them (his record is 62 lbs.). I asked him what determined where he set his lines and he said, "Any place that's easy to tie them off." It's a small river when it's low and water that's deep enough for the fish to survive in becomes a little bit more important than structure--and you're NEVER far from structure in the Big Black anyhow.:smile2:

    Hmmmm.... I might just go down there and try my luck again about the 2nd week of July.
     
  8. JHow

    JHow New Member

    Messages:
    28
    State:
    South East
    I can relate to everything you say! espicially about the cover EVERYWHERE. I just got a depth finder for my kayak, and I finished my new trotline which is pretty stout. My biggest question is how do you catch 3-4" bluegill? I tried to catch some at my bass pond, and everyone but two was over or about 6"!
    I think I might try to build a bream trapt from the plans here. Before I go, I'm gonna go bream fishing and the little ones will go in a storage tank that I'll build. With the scraps, I'll make cutbait that I'll freeze for the trip. I'm pumped and when I get back I'll be sure to update.
     
  9. stillwater

    stillwater New Member

    Messages:
    4
    State:
    Mississippi
    Nearly all the ponds I've found that I could catch enough bait for a trip pretty much had nothing in them but Bluegills.

    I have a small pond that we cleaned out with Rotnone and restocked it with about 25 big fat Bluegills and nothing else. That was about 7 or 8 years ago. Now it's so overpopulated with 3 and 4 inch fish they can't grow any larger. A handful of cracker crumbs and a casting net will catch all I need in just a few minutes. Like someone else said in a previous post, don't underestimate those 6 in. Bluegills. A 10 or 12 lb. flathead can easily inhale a baitfish that size. I would rather have that size baitfish and about a 7/0 hook on trotlines or throw-lines in the Big Black. Didn't mention it before but goldfish work well too if you can get them. Some bait shops sell them for $3 to $4 per pound.
     
  10. Lee Racing

    Lee Racing New Member

    Messages:
    15
    State:
    mississippi
    goldfish are 7.oo a pound in port gibson!