Fishing on windy days

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by Little Luey, Dec 4, 2006.

  1. Little Luey

    Little Luey New Member

    Messages:
    740
    State:
    Arizona
    How come the fish do not bite during windy days?

    I heard a few guys say that before and I was not convinced but yesterday I got out and it was very windy, only had one bite on a couple of hours. What is the relation between wind and fishing?
     
  2. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    The fish don't bite when the fishermen don't fish. Actually, though, it depends on why the wind is blowing. If a front is coming in, it may cause the fish to start moving. I've caught fish when the wind was blowing, but not many in a North wind as a front came in. The Southeast wind that blows much of the time in the Texas Gulf Coast doesn't seem to affect fishing, unless it gets over 20, then its too windy to fish anyway.
     

  3. CatHound

    CatHound New Member

    Messages:
    164
    State:
    Missouri
    Try fishing off the windward side of the body of water. Usually the fish move from the lee side to the windward side to get the baitfish that are concentrated there and are pushed dashed against the shore or dashed on the rocks by the wave action. The longer the wind has been blowing in one direction the more likely the fish have followed it in that direction.

    Also the stuff that the bait fish feed on has been blown by the wind to the windward side and the bait fish follow it. On windy days, just remember to position your self to be casting into the wind and not with it.
     
  4. FishBrew

    FishBrew New Member

    Messages:
    329
    State:
    North Texas
    Agree with Cathound. The wind can effect things as far as where the fish are, where they move to ... but they will still feed. When I here this I normally ask them where they were fishing and you here somehing like "all my usual spots that have produced for me in the past". My guess, the cats did not stop biting, they just moved to where the bait fish are. Also, depending on how a person is fishing, feeling a bite can be difficult with the wind blowing. Post cold fronts tend to be the tuffest fishing, wind or no wind.
    For catfishing, I prefer some wind to be blowing (maybe around 10 - 15 mph). Can't tell you the number of times I've seen the shallow bite just die when the wind/water go calm.
     
  5. CJ21

    CJ21 New Member

    Messages:
    4,303
    State:
    Montgomery, Alabama
    The wind also affects things here! If its blowing they wont bite. lol:
     
  6. upncomincatfishking

    upncomincatfishking New Member

    Messages:
    415
    State:
    Cheviot Ohio
    i've had allright luck when it been windy as long as it wasnt super windy.
     
  7. catman529

    catman529 New Member

    Messages:
    817
    State:
    Tennessee
    I'm not a wind expert but remember these:

    Wind from the west, fish bite the best
    wind from the east, fish bite the least.

    Keep that in mind when you are fishing.
     
  8. Little Luey

    Little Luey New Member

    Messages:
    740
    State:
    Arizona
    Thanks, yesterday the wind was blowing from the North.
     
  9. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    You also need to remember.... Wind from the North, fish won't come forth (alghough I have caught my personal best Largemourth and blue cat and limited out on crappie on north winds) Wind from the east, fishing is least. Seems to hold true as I've been too busy to fish on an east wind. South and west... yep, go fish on them days. LOL
     
  10. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    That's an old saw about the wind. Along the Texas Gulf Coast and East Texas, the prevailing winds are Southeast, East, and Southwest. My preference is for the Southeast and East wind, but maybe that's because its the best way for me to drift.
     
  11. CatHound

    CatHound New Member

    Messages:
    164
    State:
    Missouri
    The only one not mentioned thus far is:

    Wind from the south and fish open their mouth.
     
  12. catman529

    catman529 New Member

    Messages:
    817
    State:
    Tennessee
    I knew that one, just wasn't sure if I remembered it correctly.

    "wind from the north, fish will come forth" that is the other one right?
     
  13. GMC FishHauler

    GMC FishHauler New Member

    Messages:
    1,335
    State:
    Waco, Texas, Un
    my best fishing was right before a norther blew in, and then when was leaving(south wind)
    But i still fish when the norther is blowing, i do alright then but i think its just where i fish that effects whether or not i am catching, not really whether the wind is blowing or not
     
  14. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,177
    State:
    NC
    Actually, I have better luck when the wind if blowing a little. When we fished on Santee late last summer the bite came to a HALT when the wind died. I have seen the same thing happen.

    Now, with that said, too much wind can wreck things too. Like others have said, the direction has a lot to do with it and where you are fishing in relation to where it is blowing. Also, all of my fishing is from a boat, so that may be what makes it possible.
     
  15. CATFISHPAT

    CATFISHPAT New Member

    Messages:
    421
    State:
    Oklahoma
    Well I was going to say somthing but my Brothers don did,The wind can be a tool or a pain in the neck.:0a24:
     
  16. bluehunter

    bluehunter New Member

    Messages:
    3,004
    State:
    Los Angele
    I concur with what others has said. A little wind to moderate is fine. My best crappie fishing occurs in te wind as I can drift jigs and cover a lot of area.
    Wind for catfishing can also lead to good drift fishing. I have had decent trips fishing for cats in moderate conditions. Another good thing about the wind is if you can find a cove or a good area blocked by the wind, it can be a productive spot like a hill, mountain, or rocks and you have relatively calm water. If baitfish are being blown in a certain direction and you can locate that, you can have a wide open day on the cats.

    But if there is white caps out on the water, I prefer to not fish in that and use some discretion. No need to put yourself in a dangerous situation when you can catch them on better days.
     
  17. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    I take it you dont like a little water over the bow Brian?
    I dont care to be a human cork bobbing all day either.
    I'd rather stay home and talk to you fellas on the board.
     
  18. gilmafam

    gilmafam Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,466
    State:
    California
    Brian,

    We would have had a moderate off shore wind last Sun.. stayed home for boat work....the wind would have slowed the drift from the sea swell and rock codding would have been great.... another time

    bayrunner ray
     
  19. colten

    colten Member

    Messages:
    420
    State:
    Texas
    I have caught some of my biggest fish on windy days.
     
  20. jim

    jim New Member

    Messages:
    2,579
    State:
    Jacksonville NC
    Believe me we actually pray for wind on Santee.Most of the guides will tell you and my experience bears it out that the better it blows the better the Blues like it as do the stripers.Now wind does cause discomfort to the fishermen but not the fish.Wind aireates the water and provides current,two vital ingredients to good fishing.It also stacks up or concentrates baitfish.What makes it hard for the fishermen is its hard to cast against the wind,if you like to watch those rod tip for the slightest sign of a bite a windy day is not going to be your cup of tea.Go to the shore the wind is blowing against and that is where the bait is going to be, the predators also.That was a hard thing to learn on Santee because the natural tendency is to find a protected cove,point etc to get out of the wind.I also found that smallmouths love a good blow and stack up on the windy shore as the shad are pushed there,it wasn't fun fishing on Dale Hollow in a high wind but the catching was excellent.Striper everywhere I have fished for them love bad weather probably because it disorients the schools of baitfish breaks them up and makes them easier prey.You can see the effects of a steady wind in how the fish will stack up on the backsides of those underwater humps at Santee.As you drift you will get most hits as the baits come over the topand head down the protected backside.That current is just like a river as it pushes food along.One good point made earlier is the fish move and adjust constantly so your "usual" spots might not be holding fish.Fishing in the wind is like drinking Scotch an aquired taste.You must of course be careful and constantly monitor the weather so you don't get caught out.:smile2: