fishing heavy current

Discussion in 'Flathead Catfish' started by slikk03, Jun 22, 2008.

  1. slikk03

    slikk03 New Member

    Messages:
    2,507
    State:
    illinois
    i went out last night to a dam with swift current with my usual 2 ouce weaght, and it just washed to the bank or i got hung up how much and what kind of weght should i use in heavy curent when flathead fishing, also my poll stayed bent felt like a fish tugging, not used to that current, in the middle of illinois
     
  2. river scum

    river scum New Member

    Messages:
    3,474
    State:
    hooterville indiana
    need to hit the creeks and shore line current breaks when it like that. the trash getting on the line is another reason i hate current. it sure is your friend when channel catfishing though.
     

  3. brother hilljack

    brother hilljack New Member

    Messages:
    7,305
    State:
    Shelbyville, TN
    The flatheads are going to be sitting on the edges of that heavy current. Find a place that contains "slower" water with some cover and the flats will be sitting there. If you find the right spot, you may not even need to change you rig
     
  4. CJ21

    CJ21 New Member

    Messages:
    4,303
    State:
    Montgomery, Alabama
    I think heavy current, is more for Bluecatfishing.
     
  5. CATFISHERMAN001

    CATFISHERMAN001 New Member

    Messages:
    259
    State:
    ALABAMA
    It is my experience that you will not have alot of luck in the heavy currents if you are chasing the flatheads. I would move to a slower moving current or fish the areas where the swift current tapers off or like already said along the shore lines where the current is moving but not swift. Remember to look for places that have cover and you should do fine with the flatheads. 2oz of weight should be sufficient for the locations that you should be fishing for flatheads.
     
  6. woodchucker

    woodchucker New Member

    Messages:
    128
    State:
    La Quinta,Ca
    I like to fish out of the current as well.Find some nice slack water.Thats where Ive had the best luck.But I think they also gather/feed right next to heavy curent like below the danms, jettys and dykes.But for me those areas are allot harder to fish than the slack water spots.
     
  7. slikk03

    slikk03 New Member

    Messages:
    2,507
    State:
    illinois
    so how would i fish a dam with that kind of current from the bank , or is it to much of a pain
     
  8. woodchucker

    woodchucker New Member

    Messages:
    128
    State:
    La Quinta,Ca
    I have heard of people using three way swivels with a small lb test attachted to the wieight part.Because your gonna get snagged just about every cast,but when a big flatty takes your bait it will break away the wieght when hooked.I would suggest bringing lots of tackle and wieghts.Although Ive never actually used this techniqe,it may work .You may need heavy weights,5,6,7+oz?Good luck,
    Bill
     
  9. germanmudfish

    germanmudfish New Member

    Messages:
    492
    State:
    Gray, GA
    BassMassey and i went out last night and fished the tail race at Lake Sinclair. We were using 5 oz. weights and were just watching them push back to our side of the rock walls. I think we lost two rigs using the 10# line to secure the weight for sacrifice. He managed to hook onto a nice 15# blue in the currect, but lost in on the wall trying to get it up.
     
  10. flathunter

    flathunter New Member

    Messages:
    5,723
    State:
    Ohio
    I dont catch many flats out of heavy current, but when I am fishing heavy current I use sinkers uo to 8-ozs.
     
  11. FATFLATTIE

    FATFLATTIE New Member

    Messages:
    2,170
    State:
    ILM, NC
    I don't really like heavy current either but I do use 6 or 8oz sometimes in the river to keep things in place. I however do most of my flathead fishing in a lake or slow moving creeks.
     
  12. jagdoctor1

    jagdoctor1 New Member

    Messages:
    708
    State:
    CA/AZ
    I fish almost exclusively with the sacrifice system. I don't like 3 way's though I've broken a few and so I don't use them anymore. Here in Blythe the river is lined with rocks. and the only deep spots are curves in the river where the current is hitting hte inside corner. I put my mainline to the same eyelet of a barrel swivel as the leader, on the other eyelet I use 12 pd test to about 4-6 ounces of weight. I put it out there and let it come into the rocks. Then just leave it there. The 1.5-2 foot line to my weights keeps the bluegill just out of the rocks.
     
  13. woodchucker

    woodchucker New Member

    Messages:
    128
    State:
    La Quinta,Ca
    Chris,
    Do you fish the river from shore or a boat?The method you decribed would have really helped me out when I first started fishing the river from the bank.Seems the only areas avalable to fish from the bank are the rip rap stuff.
     
  14. slikk03

    slikk03 New Member

    Messages:
    2,507
    State:
    illinois
    i fish the bank no boat
     
  15. jagdoctor1

    jagdoctor1 New Member

    Messages:
    708
    State:
    CA/AZ
    You got it. I fish from the bank. I do beleive that it could work well from a boat as well if you parked on an inside curve and let the current take it downstream into the rocks. The bluegill only have the rocks to hide in so the flathead cruise the bank looking for them and hey look there's my bluegill right by the rocks but he just can't seem to get into them to hide.

    You said the only areas available to fish from the bank are the rip rap.. that's not exactly true. I have also used this sacrifice system and walked along the rocks looking for logs in the water or large rocks that appear to have undercuts beneath them. When I see them I drop the bait right next to them and wait. I have caught flathead like this at times when I couldn't catch them any of my normal places... even in the winter.
     
  16. reeftank

    reeftank New Member

    Messages:
    90
    State:
    iowa bettendorf
    when i lived up in ill we get big flattys here all year long
     
  17. Kansas Tree Rat

    Kansas Tree Rat New Member

    Messages:
    486
    State:
    Waverly, Kansas
    When the river is high I spend most of my time fishing stright down from the tip of my rod. As several people alrealy mentioned the fish will hang out of the current. Which in alot of cases means right up next to the bank. You just drop a bait stright down from the end of your rod until it hits bottom and wait a few minutes then pick it up and move it a few feet. My brothers and I call this dabbling. We have caught lots of Flatheads this way up to 40 lbs. Some people think that the fish are out in the middle...wrong the fish are where the current is right and the bait fish are. Hummmm most of the time that is within a few feet of the bank. The first thing I do anytime I get to a hole on the river even if the water is not high and I plan on fishing the edge of the current farther out is to dabble the bank. It is a real thrill when a biggin slams your bait and you only have 4 feet of line out. Oh by the way if one does hit drop your rod tip and feed him some line. Wait until he chomps the bait a couple of times and starts off with it before you set the hook.
    The other thing that helps is to wade fish the spots on the river that you fish when the river is at full summer low. Then when the water is up you know where the rock piles and rip rap are.
     
  18. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    IMO, heavy current means heavy tackle. I've seen big Penn reels loaded with 50# line get completely spooled by a big fish in the current. And around here, it's common to use a 12'-15' rod for distance, and also for keeping as much of your line out of the water as possible. If you have trouble with heavy sinkers breaking off during casting, when you've attached them with light line, check the library for diagrams on how to make a sinker sacrificer that lets you cast with the weight attached by a heavy line, then when it hits the water, leaves the sinker attached by a very light line.