fishing a shallow current break are there fish here

Discussion in 'IOWA RIVERS TALK' started by bulethed, Aug 27, 2009.

  1. bulethed

    bulethed New Member

    Messages:
    82
    State:
    oklahoma
    by all means, toss a live gill in there.

    bill.
     
  2. Flootie16

    Flootie16 New Member

    Messages:
    1,268
    State:
    Indiana
    Well flatheads are hunters and they love to be able to ambush their prey. So yeah Id say that the flatheads would be at that logjam out of the current waiting on the baitfish to head in there. I would find what baitfish is native to that water and start with useing that first. If that doesnt work then try to cut the baitfish up to hopefully entise the not so hungry flatty to bite. And you can always try a bluegill. they have their moments when they are untouchable. If you are fishing bottom then id put my bait as close as i can to the log jam and as close to the backside of the jam as i could go without getting past it. if its past the jam then a flattie might not want to waste his time chaseing, but if its near the back he might wait for it to come back and after the bait isnt comming he might get eager and come to it. and if you can bobber fish try tossing a bobber at the front of the pile and letting it drift down past the back. this makes the bait look more natural and could trigger a quicker bite
     

  3. Catfish_Scooter

    Catfish_Scooter New Member

    Messages:
    2,055
    State:
    Tennessee
    A few may cruise by at night, but that shallow water around that jam will mostly just hold channels.
     
  4. Flootie16

    Flootie16 New Member

    Messages:
    1,268
    State:
    Indiana
    You would be surprised by how many fish head to the shallow waters at night to feed. Shallow water makes it easier to catch their dinner. walk down to the river around 2 in the morning. or lake pond whatever it is you fish. take a spotlight and walk up the bank. Id almost guarantee you that you will see catfish right up on the bank. they are there feeding. its shallow. and much easier. I have caught countless flatheads and decent ones too in less than ten feet of water. Ive caught a few in around 2-4 foot of water when i threw a small shad or something up on the bank trying to catch a small channel. So dont worry about how shallow that hole is. as long as there is a reason for the baitfish to be there....there is a reason for the flathead to be there.
     
  5. lookin_4_moby

    lookin_4_moby New Member

    Messages:
    1,143
    State:
    Guthrie, OK
    I fish a lot of areas that you just described and just before night time or just before sunrise will be your best times. The flatties will be coming out to feed in the evening and are more than likely going to eat whatver you have in front of them. just before sunrise they will be heading home to the logjam to rest for the day but once again won't turn down an easy meal if it's sitting there this usually works for me in shallow water breaks. If you fish it during the day, I think it's already been mentioned previously, but fish the front of the jam and throw you bait right in front of it as close to the jam as you can get without getting snagged the front side of the jam is going to be your deeper water because of the erosion.
     
    Last edited: Aug 27, 2009
  6. Longjohn119

    Longjohn119 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,203
    State:
    Iowa
    Iowa fish biologists that have tagged flathead and have been studying their behavior on the lower Iowa River and Mississippi Pool 18 have found that at night when they are feeding you'll seldom find flatheads in more than 8 feet of water. Many (but not all) feed within 500 yards of where they hole up in the daytime. If there is a deep hole with cover nearby then I'd say you might have a good spot but the only sure way to tell is to throw in a line with a sunfish or big chub, bullhead ....

    Even if you don't catch a flathead I've caught a lot of larger channels on sunfish, in fact the vast majority of my 10+ pound channels were caught on live bait. I normally fish one pole with a live sunfish and one pole with shad using several different presentations (Fillets, chunks, butterflied, whole, heads and gutpockets, etc) although on occasion I'll fish both poles sunfish or both shad if that bait is really working well. I seldom use anything other than sunfish and shad because a) they work best for me and b) it's what I can get myself and c) I can get them both in the same location I put in my boat and d) I can get them both consistently from May until October although early on the shad can be a lot of work