First Try at making my own sinkers

Discussion in 'MISSOURI RIVERS TALK' started by BajaCoop, Oct 28, 2007.

  1. BajaCoop

    BajaCoop Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,209
    State:
    Poplar Bluff,MO
    I made my first go at pouring my own sinkers tonight and while I was pretty slow and had to redo a bunch of them, it wasn't too bad.

    A couple of things that I encountered that I am not sure what to do with:

    How do you guys regulate the temperature of your mold so that you get a good pour.

    I had a bunch of lead that I cleaned up and poured into couple pound blocks for later use, I poured them into a muffin(I read on here where someone else did that, I oiled the pan before pouring but still had problems with the lead sticking to the bottom of the pan and pretty much destroyed it getting the blocks out. So what do you guys do to keep the lead from sticking.
     
  2. theonecatfishbob

    theonecatfishbob New Member

    Messages:
    4,100
    State:
    Wright City, Missouri
    I use an electric hot plate and a small cast iron skillet. When i start melting my lead I use my hand held propane torch to speed things up. I will put the flame of the torch on the mold to begin with to bring the temp up closer to the temp of the lead. Then when I am starting a new batch of lead I will set the mold close to the skillet on the hot plate to help keep up the temp. But from time to time it will cool off enough to mess up the first couple of weights I pour. just remelt and move on. As for the muffin pan I only melt what I plan to use immediately. A lot of those baking pans now are coated with teflon. I dont know but is it possible yours was. If so that could have caused the problem. I really dont know though.
     

  3. Vince Copple

    Vince Copple New Member

    Messages:
    765
    State:
    Missouri
    I dont use muffin tins to pour the lead in after it is cleaned. Instead use the biggest mold that you have and leave it open and pour into it. Ill use my 14 and 16 roll sinker mold for this to end up with clean lead that is 7 and 8 ounces.

    I also do not preheat my molds. Normally after two pours, it is hot enough by then.

    Ed Which mold are you having problems with?
     
  4. Cuz

    Cuz New Member

    Messages:
    7,241
    State:
    DeSoto, MO
    I bought an electric lead melting pot that holds 20 pounds, and has a downspout and I LOVE IT. Just keep dropping lead in it, and keep pulling down the latch to fill the molds. I made 40 pounds in a couple of hours. It has a temperature control knob, and I found 8.5 works just about perfect for the bigger poors like the 8 ounce no-rolls. I can see a pretty knarley winter habit this January. :smile2: I'll have sinkers comin out my ears.
     
  5. Vince Copple

    Vince Copple New Member

    Messages:
    765
    State:
    Missouri
    Watch out Cuz. Before you know it you will have coffee cans of each one sitting around somewhere. Or knowing you, you will get in your wood shop and make up bins for them all. LOL
     
  6. Cuz

    Cuz New Member

    Messages:
    7,241
    State:
    DeSoto, MO
    Thats already in the works. :smile2: Actually in the process of designing a cedar wood rack that will fit in the back of the boat that I can toss a bunch of pretied weights on for fishing the dams. I'll usually go through 20-30 on a long day on a dam, so I'll have to have quite a few bank sinkers made up for this spring and summer. For now, i've just been stacking them up on a shelf in the barn. I've got roughly 70 pounds made up already, and would have more, but ran out of lead. I think Mr Gary has us hooked up though compliments of one very nice sir by the name of Harold. :wink:
     
  7. dinger66

    dinger66 New Member

    Messages:
    899
    State:
    north alabama
    find you an old cast iron cornbread pan the one that looks like corn cobs they make just the rigt size to remelt
     
  8. BajaCoop

    BajaCoop Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,209
    State:
    Poplar Bluff,MO
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    Do you put anything on the pan to keep it from sticking or do they just not stick?
     
  9. BajaCoop

    BajaCoop Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,209
    State:
    Poplar Bluff,MO
    The problem I would have is that if the mold was not hot enough the lead would freeze up at the very top of the mold and would not make it into the mold.

    Also (I don't know if this is just my mold or others too) if i got it to hot I had alot of run out.
     
  10. Vince Copple

    Vince Copple New Member

    Messages:
    765
    State:
    Missouri
    You might consider taking a small file and opening up the holes abit more where you pour it. I had to do this on several of the molds that I have. This will allow the lead to pour in there faster so it will complete the ring in those weights and not get stuck at the top. Just try it on one that you are not getting the good pour on. It doesnt take much at times.
     
  11. RIVER-RAT

    RIVER-RAT New Member

    Messages:
    3,128
    State:
    MO / MT
    I've got one of those melting pots like Cuz mentioned and I'll tell ya what, that thing is awesome! Just throw the lead in, watch it melt, then lift the handle and the molten lead pours out through a spout into the mold without a problem. No oiling needed, the weights come out of the mold easily without a problem! It's pretty darn cool!
     
  12. dinger66

    dinger66 New Member

    Messages:
    899
    State:
    north alabama
    no not in the cast iron i havent used any oil.and if you need lead check the local junck yard for old tire weights
     
  13. Vince Copple

    Vince Copple New Member

    Messages:
    765
    State:
    Missouri
    Cuz and Rat caught the weight bug.. look out! Before you know it they will have a propane unit that will be able to melt down and clean 50 pounds of tire weights..
     
  14. catfish kenny

    catfish kenny New Member

    Messages:
    6,064
    State:
    Iowa
    I have lee that does 20lb a shot and you want to clean all lead befor you put it into it and once your mold is hot it will poor right. I think in time you will learn a technique to it and it will work for you.I can pound out a couple hundred pounds in no time. I have found the smaller the sinker the harder to pour to...............It pays for a serious fisher to invest in a smelter/molds...2 years and mine has started to make me money and WAL-MART cannot beat me.......I take care of alot of my friends and in return I ask them to keep the lead comin:wink: PLUS A COUPLE BUCKS HERE AN THERE TOO:eek:oooh::eek:oooh:
     
  15. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    I can see where you would need to get your lead into clean ingots if you have one of those electric production pots with the bottom pour, but since I've always just used an open pot, I never saw the need for ingots. Melting & pouring before I melt & pour sounds too much like double work to me. If I fill my pot 3/4 full, it will probably hold 30#-35# of lead. I put the pot on the heat, pile a bunch of tire weights & scrap lead into the pot, and when it's all melted, use a big spoon to skim off the steel clips, slag, and other such stuff. Once the melted lead gets down to 5# or so, it gets too hard to dip our enough to pour properly, so in goes another batch of tire weights and lead scraps. But that gives me 20#-25# of sinkers at one pouring, without any wait for new melting of lead. Often, that's enough.
     
  16. Vince Copple

    Vince Copple New Member

    Messages:
    765
    State:
    Missouri
    The big drawback of using one of the production pots is that you have to use clean lead. I do not have an ingot mold, instead Ill use one of my bigger molds. I will start out with the tire weights in a 20 ounce ladle and melt them down with a torch. I have a coffee can with a few dents in the top for the torch to sit in so I do not have to hold it. Melt that down and pour weights from that. Many of the smaller molds take between 10 to 14 ounces. The extra melted lead, Ill just pour into an open mold from the ladle and start fresh with more tire weights. The mistakes and excess weight from the pour spouts that you cut off goes into another coffee can for the production pot for the second phase of pouring the weights. This is not the fastest process there is as something like Jerry uses would be the way to go for the first melt. A better way would be to get a turkey fryer and use a kettle. Just havent moved up to this yet. I enjoy making weights for something to do out in the garage.
     
  17. sbowes77

    sbowes77 New Member

    Messages:
    38
    State:
    missouri
    i use a cast dutch oven and a fish cooker which i am sure none of u have lol and i use tire weights mostly for lead and i made a little basket out of expanded metal so i can throw the steel out when the lead melts with out scooping up every one i just fill up my basket and set it in my cooker light the propain and then my torch and melt away the cooker well hold about 40-60 lbs i would guess and i use a ladle to pour the lead and a spoon to get the contamintes out of the lead but the basket makes short work of that as far as keeping your molds hot hold them over the pot and if you get it to hot and it has run out justs set it down and take a breather or i just pick up another mold and make a differnt style or size of weights i do have a ingot mold but any steel or cast pots would work as long as it is cooled long enough well thats my 2 cents worth have fun
     
  18. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    I do use a fish/turkey cooker burner for my heat source, but I've never been able to talk myself into using a cast iron pot. I'd rather use it for food. Instead, I scrounge around till I find a big, heavy-duty saucepan that's seen better days. A pot with a non-stick surface that's been mostly worn away is a perfect choice. If you can't find one in the trash, you can buy one in this condition for no more than a buck at a thrift store.
     
  19. BajaCoop

    BajaCoop Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,209
    State:
    Poplar Bluff,MO

    I made another go at pouring some sinkers today and opening up the top with a file made a huge difference. The mold was much less finicky about it's temp and it took me about 1/10 of the time to make as many sinkers as I did before. Thanks for the great advice.


    Now I am going to want to spend more money and get a fancy melting pot. As right now I am just making a charcoal fire which works fine until the fire starts to die down. And I have already spent 15 bucks on charcoal to clean and pour the lead.
     
  20. brad kilpatrick

    brad kilpatrick New Member

    Messages:
    2,666
    State:
    Kansas City
    A propane fish cooker would be a good investment. As you get more into pouring Your Own sinkers you want to also invest in some good Do-it molds they will work much better then the one You are currently using!