First time jugging

Discussion in 'Alternative Methods of Catching Catfish' started by Cdbush28, Aug 13, 2008.

  1. Cdbush28

    Cdbush28 New Member

    Messages:
    58
    State:
    Washington
    I finally set out my first set of jugs last weekend. We did not catch anything the jugs only floated about an hour, it was more of an experimental thing. I wasn't sure how well jugs would float down our windy full of log jams river. It actually surprised me how well the jugs took the bends in the river as long as we set them in the channel in the middle of the river (average 100yd's wide). I have a few questions though. First when i limb line i target feeding areas in calm water, the jugs aren't obviously going to do that so what do you think the percentage of fish caught on jugs vs. limb lines would be? Second question is how to properly rig your hooks and weights? I used 10/0 circles with a 3 oz. weight. The weight was 12-14 inches below the the hook. My hooks had a 12in. leader. I am not sure if this the best way to do this. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Thanks
     
  2. Buddrice

    Buddrice New Member

    Messages:
    4,032
    State:
    Louisiana
    I run three to four feet lines on my jugs and I try to float them across any flats that I can find in the river.I use 3/0 and 4/0 hooks because I am not targeting big fish,but will catch one every now and then.I have found that flats and current are my ideal areas.I also fish either cut shad or chicken hearts.Hope this helps a little..:wink:
     

  3. Sunday Money

    Sunday Money New Member

    Messages:
    81
    State:
    north carolina
    It sounds to me like you have a very decent rig. I run 7/0 circle hooks on a noodle 14 inches long. Most of our fish are caught on noodles with a length of 4 to 8 ft. Let them drift dept contours and changes and play that current along with the wind.
     
  4. boost3782

    boost3782 New Member

    Messages:
    32
    State:
    USA
    I fish noodles that are cut into 17 1/2 inch sections with 1/2 inch pvc pipe in them with a hole cut for line in the pvc. I put about 14 ft of line on them and keep a rubber band on each one to adjust depth. I also put a 1oz or 2oz weight on mine but above the hook (wich is a 10/0) about 6-10 inches. I will fish several of them at diffrent depths until I figure out which depths the fish are hitting on at the time.

    Just keep trying to experiment with different depths and lock on to what is working and set your jugs to around that depth is my best advice for ya. As I float around following my jugs I also try and keep an eye on my fish finder and see how deep it is and the contour of the bottom. Doing that you can get a good idea of the part of the river your fishing and start to know where the flats are and where your hitting the fish.

    Jugging is great fun! Just keep at it and it'll pick up for ya. :wink:

    Kyle
     
  5. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    What kind of cats y'all got up there? Channels & no blues? How about flatheads? I catch a lot of blues out in the main channel of the Arkansas River, but it seems like I catch most of my channels along the rocky riprapped banks. I've never caught a keeper sized flathead on a jug that was floating downriver with the current, but I've caught several on jugs that got hung up and were stationary. If you're after flatheads, you might want to try anchoring a few jugs in likely spots, just to see how it works for you.
     
  6. Cdbush28

    Cdbush28 New Member

    Messages:
    58
    State:
    Washington
    We have plenty of Flathead, blues, and channels here. I caught a white cat on RR a few weeks ago, it was just a small one (10in). I have tried the anchored jug and had success but i put it where i normally limb line so i didn't see any advantage of the jug. I like the idea of the weight above the hook i will have to give that a try. thanks for everyones input.
     
  7. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    I definitely agree that a limbline is better than an anchored jug. But a lot of the places I fish just don't have much in the way of overhanging limbs. It's either anchored jugs or bank poles. Incidentally, all my catfish jugs have the weight on the bottom; a 20p nail provides all the weight I need for my freefloating jugs, and doesn't hang up as easily. I use a 2# cannonball for my anchored jugs (2-liter). The only time I rig my sinker above the hook is when I jug for crappie; I put a splitshot sinker above a gold crappie hook, using 10# mono for my jugline.
     
  8. Cdbush28

    Cdbush28 New Member

    Messages:
    58
    State:
    Washington
    Has anyone ever tried putting the weight on the bottom and putting a swivel on the hook leader and rigging it to where it can travel the full lenght of the jug line?
     
  9. Cdbush28

    Cdbush28 New Member

    Messages:
    58
    State:
    Washington
    Here is a pic of what i am talking about
     

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  10. jimmy willaby

    jimmy willaby New Member

    Messages:
    71
    State:
    TEXAS
    AT LAKE TAWAKONI WE MAKE OUR MAIN LINE 50 FEET WITH WEIGHT ON BOTTOM. ABOUT 4 FT. UP WE PLACE A 6.0 HOOK WITH A 3 WAY BARREL SWIVEL THEN :tounge_out:ABOUT 4 MORE FT. UP WE PLACE ANOTHER 3 WAY BARREL SWIVEL. AND BAIT WITH SHAD OR PERCH THE JUG DOES NOT FLOAT AWAY SINCE WE ARE ONLY FISHING 35 OR 40 FT. OF WATER , HAVE CAUGHT SOME 40 AND 50 # HI-FIN ON TAWAKONI.

    A COUNTRY BOY CAN SURVIVE !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:big_smile:
     
  11. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Welcome to the BOC, Jimmy!
     
  12. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Maybe I'm missing something, but why would you want to? It seems to me that your bait, or baits, would slide right down to the bottom. I've got one bait positioned there, with others up the jugline. I guess, if you were using a live baitfish, it could swim up and down the jugline, but again, why would you want it to do that? I want my bait, cut or live, to stay at the depth I choose. If you feel that there's some advantage to a sliding rig, I'd love to hear it. I'm always interested in learning something new.
     
  13. bnewsom71

    bnewsom71 New Member

    Messages:
    537
    State:
    Mathervill
    Some awesome info on jugging! A lot of stuff that I never thought about. I used to do it alot with my grandpa when I was a kid, reading this, I think I know what I will be doing this weekend! Thanks for relighting the juggin' fire for me!:wink:
     
  14. Cdbush28

    Cdbush28 New Member

    Messages:
    58
    State:
    Washington
    The sliding rig was just a thought. We are only alowed one hook per jug in Indiana.
     
  15. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Some of the guys in such states sometimes have some jugs with hooks at one depth, and other jugs at other depths, thus covering more of the water column.
     
  16. Sunday Money

    Sunday Money New Member

    Messages:
    81
    State:
    north carolina

    I wish we could use live bait on a jug here in NC. Cant be alive on the hook here though. Talked to a game warden earlier this year and he said if its a whole fish, better put some cuts in it to show it wasnt live when you hooked him. Majority of our fish our eating size we catch due to having to use cut bait, but this year did luck up and catch our personal best on a jug, 34 lber.
     
  17. BigOBear

    BigOBear New Member

    Messages:
    463
    State:
    TX
    Shane, Know it's not the same as jugging but I'm curious... yall allowed to use a limb line with live bait?
     
  18. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Unless it's really small, I don't like to use a baitfish (usually skipjack or shad) whole. If I want a large bait, I like to cut them from just in front of the anal fin forward at about a 45 degree angle. The idea is to cut open the body cavity without making an opening large enough for the innards to fall out. When done this way, it takes longer for all the scent to wash out of the bait, so you don't have to change it as quick.