first baitcaster...?

Discussion in 'Fishing Reel Review' started by zmany2k, Sep 20, 2005.

  1. zmany2k

    zmany2k New Member

    Messages:
    271
    State:
    APG, MD
    well, i did it. i broke down and bought a baitcaster reel. it's a saltwater reel made by offshore angler. it was an el cheapo jobber i found at bass pro shops. i needed something that would hopefully handle a wels cat on a wife restricted budget. it seems pretty heavy duty, but i was wondering if there's anything you all could tell me that would be helpful.

    you spool it just like a spinning reel right? tie off on the spool and reel in under slight tension?

    anything you all could tell me would be appreciated. i played with it already for about 10 minutes, so i think i've got all the knobs save one figured out. the one i haven't figured out yet, all it seems to do is make it click louder when you reel it in. i still need to flip through the manual, maybe i'll learn something there.
     
  2. BassMassey

    BassMassey Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,883
    State:
    Oconee
    well u would be better off lining it up by placing a pencil through the line , now i forget if u want the line to come of the top or the bottom , someone here will know for sure...........and u wanna find out which knob tightens the brake.......with ur rig all set up with sinker and bait n all u should flex the rod tip and ur bait should fall about a foot and stop, if it falls to the ground its too loose and if it doesnt drop at all its too tight, now as u get better at casting u can gradually loosen it up to ur liking.........
     

  3. zmany2k

    zmany2k New Member

    Messages:
    271
    State:
    APG, MD
    righto, thanks for the advice. i plan on casting out back with a 2 oz sinker to get some practice. maybe i'll catch some squirrels or grass bass haha.
     
  4. BassMassey

    BassMassey Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,883
    State:
    Oconee
    thats all it is is practice.......took me a while to get it down.......its all in the thumb.............and ur release point...........
     
  5. BKS72

    BKS72 New Member

    Messages:
    3,361
    State:
    East of KC
    If you are running braided line on it, you will want to either put a wrap of duct tape around the spool or put just enough mono on it to cover the spool and then splice your braided line into it. Otherwise the braid will slip on the spool.

    The posts are right on, check the brake when you make a drastic tackle change (much lighter or heavier bait or sinker) or bad things happen :) I've birdnested my abus a couple of times after taking off 6oz river sinkers and going to the lake using 1oz and forgetting to adjust the brake for the new weight.

    Good luck and post some pics of the wels you catch. They look awesome!
     
  6. Crucial

    Crucial New Member

    Messages:
    225
    State:
    Virginia Beach VA
    BassMassy is right on, spool it with your line in the vertical position (and a pencil or marker or what ever in the spool to pivot on), have the line come off the top of the spool and it will roll right on your reel with little trouble. I have heard some people defeating line memory by spooling off the bottom, but the only time I tried it I saw no difference.

    The tension in the line is the key to getting off to a good start. If it's just a little too loose, it will slowly dig into its self and cause some of the worse back lashes you'll ever see, and its not even your casting that caused it (so don’t get discouraged by a few birds nests).
    Too much tension and you'll cause the line to have memory even if its a good line.
    I spool line by feel... about every so often I'll feel the line with my fingers and make sure if "feels right" and I don’t know how to tell you what that feel is, haha. It just takes some practice... you don’t want to easily feel any spring or softness in the spool (too loose) and you don’t want to be able to slide the loops of line on top with your fingers (way too loose) but you don’t want it to feel like a solid rock either (way too tight)... you'll just have to play with it.

    Now for the best tip anyone ever gave me with a casting reel. When your set up and ready to practice, put the same amount of weight on the line that your going to be fishing with or a little lighter... reel the weight up to a few inches from the tip and turn the breaking knob way up... depress the thumb button and see if your sinker fall's or just hangs there... you want it to hang in the air even with the thumb button pressed.
    Now back off the breaking knob a little at a time until the sinker starts to fall at a slow but steady rate. When the sinker hits the ground the spool should stop dead with no over run at all...
    This is where you start casting... now backlash will be prevented at the end of the cast, and you can concentrate on controlling through the initial part of the cast. It wont cast far, so don’t think it should.. that’s the point... this is practice. So don’t try to power the cast like your slinging a base ball bat.
    You will find that after a few casts you can easily sling the lead with out any problems at all. So back off the breaking knob a little more so that the sinker falls a faster rate, but the spool will have just a small over run (maybe a half rotation at the most)... and start casting... keep doing this until you can sling that sinker out in the lower 40's :p
    They are tons of fun to use, and a wonderful, useful piece of kit... I hope you enjoy it!
     
  7. zmany2k

    zmany2k New Member

    Messages:
    271
    State:
    APG, MD
    thanks again all. that's exactly how i put line on it. except i'm using a heavy braid and i never put any duct tape on it or mono. the pencil trick is one i've known for awhile, so i did that. i didn't know about the trick with setting the spool brake, so i'm really glad for it. soon as my rod shows up, i'll start some practice. hopefully it'll show up today.
     
  8. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

    Messages:
    5,444
    State:
    Henderson,Ky
    The button that you were speaking of is your bait clicker. It is used to set the rod so a fish can run with the bait and alert you to his presents. To use this option you simply cast it out and take up your slack after placing it in a good rod holder. Then push the release button or lever and engage the clicker and you are ready for some fun. Just remember to engage the spool release before setting the hook,LOL I have done this :eek: and let me tell you ,you won't forget again,LMAO!!! :eek:
     
  9. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

    Messages:
    5,444
    State:
    Henderson,Ky
    Once you learn to use a baitcaster you will never look at another reel in the same way again!!! They are by far the strongest fish fighting tool out there today.
     
  10. zmany2k

    zmany2k New Member

    Messages:
    271
    State:
    APG, MD
    i just figured that out earlier. i think i should be able to pick up on it pretty quick.

    thanks for the tips you all. :0a31:
     
  11. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,164
    State:
    NC
    Don't know if it was metioned, but I soak my new line spool in hot water for 5-10 minutes before loading the reel to help take the "memory" out of the line. It helps the line to form to the new size on the reel instead of wanting to spring back to the size it was on the new spool.

    All rod/reel combos seem to have a different release point, or the point at which you take your thumb off to let line fly. It should only take a few cast to figure that out. I have a small baitcasting rod for largemouth and I can only throw it underhanded. I have tried eveything to throw it overhanded, but the underhanded throw is all I can do. It is a much shorter rod than the 7'-6" cat rods I use, so this is probably part of the deal.

    Dreadnaught made some goooood points. Pay attention to what he said about the baitclicker and setting the hook!! LOL!! Nothing worse than a birdsnest and a fish on the other end. Baitcasters are the best when it comes to fighting a big fish.

    The "grass casting" as I call it is a lot less forgiving than water. In the yard you have to time it perfectly to prevent backlash. The water is a little more forgiving because it does not stop immediately like it does on soil, but it will be a good preparation for the water.