First Aid or Medical advice

Discussion in 'General Conversation' started by Cheryl, Apr 18, 2006.

  1. Cheryl

    Cheryl Well-Known Member

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    TN
    We need a sub forum somewhere on this subject.... IMO. Hint, hint.



    Ok, my question is what is everyone's knowledge on yellow jacket stings?
    I received several last fall and still have the scars and occasional itch from the stings. Can anyone enlighten me as to the after effects of the poison they put into your body?

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. astutzman

    astutzman New Member

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    Collinsville, IL
    Any venom they injected should have been washed away and degraded by your immune system by now, Cheryl. The scars will stick around though, which is good for guys (bragging rights), but sucks for the ladies. The itching is probably related to the scar tissue formation. Itches are the body's way of telling you that you have dead skin, which you then scratch off. It's probably nothing to worry about and should go away on it's own.
     

  3. Rainman4u2

    Rainman4u2 Guest

    Or the little stingers are still embedded in your skin.....:eek:h:

    Ray
     
  4. Itch2Scratch

    Itch2Scratch New Member

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    Cheryl do you happen to be a Diabetic? I am and bee stings take a LONG time to go away.:sad:
     
  5. Cheryl

    Cheryl Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the responses and have heard both previously. But what IF my immune system reacted differently for one reason or another and the venom then caused various other problems?
     
  6. Cheryl

    Cheryl Well-Known Member

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    5,010
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    TN

    Not YET it seems. Have family history of it though. Thanks and take care.
    Outta rep or I would hand some out for these responses.
     
  7. Swampy

    Swampy New Member

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    Fl.
    I told you why they were still bothering you.
     
  8. Cheryl

    Cheryl Well-Known Member

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    TN
    Please tell me again, as my mind is overwhelmed.

    My hypothesis was that possibly this venom caused the shingles, which I had twice within a few months, along with other odd things over the last few months. Sneezing uncontrollably, cold/flu 3 times, etc.
    That was where I was leading with my thoughts, was what are the long term effects, if any. Perhaps it's never been studied?
     
  9. astutzman

    astutzman New Member

    Messages:
    243
    State:
    Collinsville, IL
    Is there a lot of stress in your life, Cheryl?

    The yellow jacket venom is taken out of your body with antibodies which come from a type of white blood cells called B-cells. This usually happens pretty quickly, and is part of the reason you get all the swelling and reddness at the sting site. Once the swelling goes down, you're pretty much done with the venom because your body has destroyed it.

    There's another type of white blood cell though, called a T-cell. T-cells are responsible for killing off viruses that infect your body and normally they do a pretty good job. Sometimes T-cells get a little "lazy" though, especially when we're stressed out from work, or too little sleep, and the viruses don't miss a beat. That's why you sometimes get a cold or the flu when you're going through a stressful situation, and people that are more stressed are more likely to develop a viral infection. Stress can also cause viruses that are lying dormant in your body to flare up again. Shingles, for example, is caused by the chickenpox virus (Varicella zoster ). After you get chickenpox, you never get rid of all of the virus, because it hides out in the nerves in your spinal cord. It's usually benign, and you won't see any sympotms, until you get stressed out and your T cells start getting "lazy." The virus can then get active again and give you the shingles. The chicken pox virus can fool your body once, but it's really hard to fool it twice, so once you've had the shingles, you usually don't get them again.

    But, yeah, I said all that to say that the yellow jacket stings are probably not directly involved with the shingles or the colds you've experienced. My suggestion would be to figure out what's stressing you out, and get it out of your life.
     
  10. jim

    jim New Member

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    Jacksonville NC
    Ok if we get itches to tell us we have scar tissue that we have to scratch off,what do you do for the 'Seven Year" itch.:cool: ;) :rolleyes: :) This better be good.!!!!:)
     
  11. Cheryl

    Cheryl Well-Known Member

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    5,010
    State:
    TN
    Alan,
    That is easier said than done. I knew most of what you posted, except about the T cells. Is there anyway to build them up? A vitamin or food supplement?

    My stings didn't swell up a lot but were painful for about 12 hours. 6 stings at once was stressful in itself. I purchased a yellow jacket trap last night. Hope it works. If it does, I'll buy more before they sell out. The yellow jackets like to take over the chipmunk holes in my yard, so I never know where they are going to be next.

    Thanks for your help.
     
  12. kspor

    kspor New Member

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    Wichita Kansas
    I would go see a imuneologist(spelling). I would say that is the problem. Shingles are from the chickenpox virus and can be treated. However reoccurance and other ailments may be a sign that your system is under attack or just not up to snuff. Could be environmental, toxins, or disease. I would schedule a thorough exam with your physician and perhaps a referral to a immune specialist.
     
  13. astutzman

    astutzman New Member

    Messages:
    243
    State:
    Collinsville, IL
    Kspor's right, if you're sick and not getting better for weeks at a time, you should see a doctor. It could just be that this has been a pretty bad cold and flu season though; it seems like everyone at my work has been sick at least twice.

    As far as upping your immune system, natural is the best way. Eat fresh fruits and vegetables if you can, especially ones that are high in vitamin C (citrus). If you can't do that, take a multivitamin. Multivitamins aren't nearly as good as getting vitamins from your food, but theyr'e better than nothing. Exercise is also good for the immune system since it gets your lymph (the fluid that your immune cells float around in) flowing.

    Your attitude can also have a huge impact on your health. Lots of people know this, but no doctor's ever going to tell it to you, that's one less prescription he gets to write. I've already talked about how stress can help you get sick, but the opposite is true too. A good attitude can have a positive impact on your health. You've heard that laughter is the best medicine? You probably also know that people who are always running around yelling and getting ticked off over nothing are more likely to have high blood pressure. Keeping a good attitude is key to staying healthy.

    In summary, if you want to be healthy, eat well, exercise, and keep a positive outlook on things.
     
  14. Swampy

    Swampy New Member

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    818
    State:
    Fl.
    Why should I? You evidently didn't believe me the first time I told you or you wouldn't have asked everyone else about it.

    It's scare tissue forming around stingers that are still embedded under the skin. I've had them embedded in me & dug to many stingers out of me not to know, No,it has nothing to do with the other troubles your having.