Finding Green River Worms

Discussion in 'Catfishing Baits' started by kyredneck, Feb 22, 2009.

  1. kyredneck

    kyredneck New Member

    Messages:
    1,021
    State:
    Kentucky
    How many of you all have dug and used these for bait(they're gourmet eating for about every fish in the water here) ? I'm no expert on them and would like to learn more. I've dug them in the silt from winter rains along the river's edge in the spring (I think these are mostly strays washed from upstream) and there's a couple other spots I know of, one is where the stinging nettle grows.

    Anyone have any secrets on where to look for them?
     
  2. Dirtdobber

    Dirtdobber Guest Staff Member

    Messages:
    3,584
    State:
    Vian Okla
    What is a green river worm?
     

  3. kyredneck

    kyredneck New Member

    Messages:
    1,021
    State:
    Kentucky
    They're a stinky green earthworm that lives along creeks and rivers; short and stubby and will curl up in balls when handled; but the fish love them.
     
  4. fishstick

    fishstick New Member

    Messages:
    1,885
    State:
    Fouke, Arkansas
    we have what we call a river bottom earthworm here that grows to about 18 to 24 inches long and as big as your little finger.they are tough as boot leather and stay on the hook. they are sure hard to dig up though in the hard river bottom soils and are usually at least 1 1/2 to 2 feet deep.
     
  5. kyredneck

    kyredneck New Member

    Messages:
    1,021
    State:
    Kentucky
    Naw Billy, that ain't them. These are a tad smaller than a typical redworm and I've never found them in hard or dry ground, it's always been close to water's edge and moist. In fact, I've dug them in the silt from my boat before.
     
  6. Junior42

    Junior42 New Member

    Messages:
    500
    State:
    Catlettsburg, KY
    What part of Kentucky are you from? Here in Catlettsburg we have a flood wall by the river. We go in behind the flood wall and dig for em' and find plenty.
     
  7. catfishlarryiowa

    catfishlarryiowa New Member

    Messages:
    164
    State:
    Iowa
    here in Iowa underneath bridges with small creeks an around the bridge pillars.great bait for carp. Larry
     
  8. spanky

    spanky New Member

    Messages:
    50
    State:
    Missiouri
    Here in northwest missiouri i use a lot of green worms i hv caught every species of catfish on them anywhere from a pounder up to a 80# bluecat caught by a buddy of mine. They are very hard to come by but can be found from spring to fall on river banks and creek banks as long as there is alot of roots and compost (as in leaves in the silt mud) although you almost always have to be above the sand line. I have found them in the middle of the gumbo mud and the sand line when the river has been up and dropped back down. We dig alot of them at night when it cools off because it takes alot of time digging around to get anuff to fish with and they are worth all the time it takes to dig them. We have a bait shop in my home town that is named after them it is called stinkie fingers.
     
  9. kyredneck

    kyredneck New Member

    Messages:
    1,021
    State:
    Kentucky
    Thanks Adam, thanks Larry.

    Adam I live about 50 miles east of Lexington and fish the upper KY River. Don't have any flood walls here.

    'Stinkie fingers', i luv it, so true, they really stink.

    Jeremy, have you ever noticed finding them around stinging nettle? There's an old colony that an old timer showed me (and I don't like digging there because it's his spot) that's right smack dab in the middle of a big nettle patch up on top of the bank; I swear I can't look at those things without getting that stuff on me. Anyway, we've dug them there early before the nettles come up, and I've tried it after they're up, it ain't worth it.

    If I can get a good start with them I might try raising them. Know anyone that's done that?
     
  10. spanky

    spanky New Member

    Messages:
    50
    State:
    Missiouri
    Yes i have found them in a nettle patch but its uselly early in the year. As the year goes on i look for spots with over hanging brush that will keep a area shaded most of the day. Them spots always works out better cause of the ground temps are cooler and they are not as deep in the ground. I have found them from acouple inches in the ground to 1.5 ft in the shaded spots to 3 to 4ft down in the warm dirt that the sun has been shining on. By the way the mosquitos are worst on us the the nettle patches. A little helpful hint use a 3 or 4 point potato fork it works easier when you are trying to break up the dirt to find them. I dont know anyone that has tried raising them because they are hard to keep alive because they cant stand the heat and they cant be put in a refrigerater they need moist cool dirt and that is hard to control when you are catching as many fish as they will be catching for you. They are one of my all around favorite baits to use if you havent already noticed.:wink:
     
  11. Junior42

    Junior42 New Member

    Messages:
    500
    State:
    Catlettsburg, KY
    I'm up here in boyd county about 200 miles from ya.
     
  12. kmcalester

    kmcalester New Member

    Messages:
    1,340
    State:
    Kansas City
    Are you guys taking about the same Sodworms that was in the 2008 Catfish-Insider?
     
  13. kyredneck

    kyredneck New Member

    Messages:
    1,021
    State:
    Kentucky
    I'm up here in boyd county about 200 miles from ya. “
    Adam, I’m gonna be up in your neck of the woods later today for a meeting.


    “Are you guys taking about the same Sodworms that was in the 2008 Catfish-Insider? “

    I don’t know Kevin; sure wish I could see a pic of it.


    “They are one of my all around favorite baits to use if you havent already noticed.”

    Jeremy, they are for me too, I’d use them all the time if I could get them all of the time.
     
  14. catfishjohn

    catfishjohn New Member

    Messages:
    10,217
    State:
    Greenup Co. KY

    I dig them in the same places as Adam, behind flood walls in the moist sandy soil. Their really good bait for sure. I also dig for them on the OH side of the river. There isn't as many as there used to be because of people realizing how good of bait they are.
     
  15. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    I wish somebody would post a picture.

    The N. Canadian River is about 50 yards from my door...I'm gonna be doing a test dig.:smile2:
     
  16. catfishjohn

    catfishjohn New Member

    Messages:
    10,217
    State:
    Greenup Co. KY

    I don't have any pictures or I'd post them. I think its too early to dig for them or I'd go get some.
    Imagine a dark greenish colored red worm up to small night crawler size. They coil up and stink really bad. They smell like sewer or worse and when you put them on a hook and get the juice on your hands its hard to get off.
    They are great blue & channel cat bait if you can keep everything else away from them.
     
  17. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    Another long shot is a gray-green worm of asian origin, commonly known as
    "green worms", valued for its strong aroma, somewhat reminiscent of freshly
    dug carrots but worse (catfish love it). This is Amynthas hupeiensis, and
    it reaches very high populations in moist soils of river banks and other
    places. It may out-compete D. riparia and is spread by fishermen. Don't
    help it.

    --------------------------------------

    No pics, though.

    Oh, and about the nettles...they're very agressive colonizers of disturbed soil, which begs the question, "Which came first...the nettles or the worm diggers?"
     
  18. Dirtdobber

    Dirtdobber Guest Staff Member

    Messages:
    3,584
    State:
    Vian Okla
    If you find any please post and lets us know. I'm about 20 min from Ft Gibson dam. Should be some there if they are in Okla.:confused2:
     
  19. catfishjohn

    catfishjohn New Member

    Messages:
    10,217
    State:
    Greenup Co. KY

    That sounds like them but I would say the smell is more like sewer. Pretty foul smelling worms.
    Here is a pic I found, most of the ones I've found were a little greener but this is them...

    green-worms.jpg
     
  20. kyredneck

    kyredneck New Member

    Messages:
    1,021
    State:
    Kentucky

    That’s them John, thanks; and that’s zactly how they’ll curl up; boy those are some fat nice ones.

    Here’s a link to a photo of allolobophora chlorotica, which might be what it is:

    http://www.uclan.ac.uk/old/facs/science/erg/images/general/side_chlorotica.jpg

    I read somewhere that of the 150 species of earthworms that live in North America, 45 are not native………