Finding Depth with a Rod and Reel

Discussion in 'Bank Fishing' started by SWeiss, Sep 28, 2009.

  1. SWeiss

    SWeiss New Member

    Messages:
    751
    State:
    Pennsylvania
    Carp fishermen use this and I figure I would pass it on. Eich, feel free to correct or add anything (he's a carper).

    This is a really simple way to get a somewhat accurate measurement of depth in a lake or pond. It works well in still water, not sure about current.

    1. Mark out one foot on your rod starting at the level wind or the bail on a spinning reel.

    2. Start out with a simple Carolina rig with a heavy weight (at least 6 ounces.)

    3. Instead of a hook, rig a round plastic bobber on the end of your line.

    4. Cast your line out just beyond (a few feet) the area you want to measure.

    5. Reel in the slack in your line in until you start to drag the weight along the bottom. The bobber should be on the bottom right up against your swivel.

    6. Keeping your line TIGHT, release the spool or loosen the drag and start pulling line out in one foot increments.

    7. Keep count of how many feet you've pulled out until you see your bobber break the surface.

    Good luck!
     
    Last edited: Sep 28, 2009
  2. biga

    biga Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,112
    State:
    evansville
    i seen an old man do that at a small city pond when i was a kid and i thought he was nuts .lol when i got a little older and wiser and thought about it i got a chuckle for being so ignorant at the time:smile2:
     

  3. Mr. Foster

    Mr. Foster New Member

    Messages:
    1,352
    State:
    Kansas
    Thats a great idea. You can also just use a egg sinker to toss out and feel the terrain on the bottom. Thats what I do so I can find holes and know where to throw. Kinda scout things out, it might not tell you alot, but you will know more than when you started.
     
  4. JEFFRODAMIS

    JEFFRODAMIS New Member

    Messages:
    2,537
    State:
    TEXAS
    Great advice reps brotha
     
  5. metalman

    metalman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,456
    State:
    IN
    Name:
    Winston


    These methods can tell you a lot of info. You can find the depth, holes, drop-offs, ledges etc. You can tell if the bottom is mud, rock or sand, gravel or weed.
    They are good techiques to learn, especially if you are a bank fisher...W
     
  6. TJD

    TJD New Member

    Messages:
    258
    State:
    Missouri
    Great infomation and I know just where I will use it first.

    Thanks
     
  7. Jeremy Sheffey

    Jeremy Sheffey New Member

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    2,388
    State:
    Columbus, Ohio
    cool little trick, im glad you shared
     
  8. SWeiss

    SWeiss New Member

    Messages:
    751
    State:
    Pennsylvania
    Thanks for the reps Jeremy, I am glad it was of some use to you. :wink:
     
  9. poisonpits

    poisonpits Well-Known Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    9,755
    State:
    arkansas
    Name:
    johnnie
    you can also use a one ounce sinker and just count the seconds it takes to reach bottom.even lead falls at bout 1 foot per second been using this method for years and it works.just test it against a depth finder and you'll see.
     
  10. Mr. Foster

    Mr. Foster New Member

    Messages:
    1,352
    State:
    Kansas
    I got a pond im gonna map out with your technique, and mine. Ill probably mark it every 20' and drag the bottom for structure. I think it will tell alot once I get it on paper. Thanks for the advice.
     
  11. SWeiss

    SWeiss New Member

    Messages:
    751
    State:
    Pennsylvania
    You're welcome Brent. You can get an image from Google earth, then draw lines (like a topographic map) on it. Makes a really useful tool for fishermen.
     
  12. Mr. Foster

    Mr. Foster New Member

    Messages:
    1,352
    State:
    Kansas
    Another good idea, lol. You are the man. Im not feeling to well right now, my brain is dead. Thanks for the ideas.
     
  13. katfish ken

    katfish ken New Member

    Messages:
    4,092
    State:
    Paintsvill
    Been using this method for years. Surprising how accurate it can be.