Fertilizer question

Discussion in 'Garden Tips And Talk' started by justwannano, Oct 29, 2007.

  1. justwannano

    justwannano Active Member

    Messages:
    1,003
    State:
    SE Iowa
    I sent in a garden soil sample to the State lab last spring. I was having problems with most of my plants. Just not healthy looking and yeilds were way down. Not sure what happened unless last years fall plowing , we went deep, drug up something but the sample showed way too much P&K. Their advice was only add N. So OK how much N do I use? The sample showed it to be almost non existant.
    I have aquired a small bottle of 32%N but I don't know how much to use.
    Anybody know about 32?
    have a good one
    just
     
  2. Catpaw

    Catpaw Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,185
    State:
    Central Cail
    Name:
    James
    Bob what exactly are you trying to grow ? Was this fertile ground last year ? You say you picked up a small bottle ? What size area are you looking at here ? i might be able to help you out
     

  3. catfish kenny

    catfish kenny New Member

    Messages:
    6,064
    State:
    Iowa
    We have a store here called GATE CITY SEED the man running it can accomidate any quistions you have,I suggest goto yer local seed supply store and hopefully they are as good as ours....
     
  4. bearcat

    bearcat Member

    Messages:
    925
    State:
    Nokomis, Illinois
    It is normal for the Nitrogen test to show little or none. It is a very moblie in the soil profile. It also leaches out easily. Also plants use it up fast . The soil also has no way of storing nitrogen. It is some thing you have to put on every year.

    I would recomend that you talk to your local plant person and see how much N that each plant would need during the year. It could very from one type of plant to the next.
     
  5. justwannano

    justwannano Active Member

    Messages:
    1,003
    State:
    SE Iowa
    Regular garden veggies for around here.
    Tomatos, peas.gr beans,peppers,cucumbers,squash,radishes,onions.
    garden is 40'X40'.
    My garden has been in that spot for about 15 years.
    Here are the lab results
    %OM 10.5
    ppmP 722
    ppm K 999
    ph 7
    .
    recomended levels are
    add 7# lime per 1k sq ft.
    ppm P 49 is high
    ppm K 249 is high

    just add N
    I've aready added lime
    thanks for any help
    just
     
  6. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

    Messages:
    5,444
    State:
    Henderson,Ky
    Each one of these plants will require a different amount of "N". Beans don't require Nitrogen at all. You have to decide what you are going to plant the most of and go with that formulation. Can't really say unless you can tell us how much of what you are going to plant.
    I would wait a while before I put any more "P" or "K" on this garden. Your phosphate and potash levels are high enough for a while. These will disapate but they take longer than "N".

    I talked to a "Certified Crop Adviser" and this is what he told me.
     
  7. Bayoubear

    Bayoubear New Member

    Messages:
    425
    State:
    near that hellhole dallas
    i find it odd that they would suggest adding lime to a Ph neutral soil. lime is used to balance the ph of acidic soil. (sulfur is used in alkali soil) all in a goal to reach 7 or close to it.

    comments about nitrogen being mobile in the soil are correct. it doesnt stay around long. the most common forms of high N fert are ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate which either at best remains for about a month before its either used by the plants or breaks down in the soil. some more expensive ferts will contain a slow release N as part of the available N (look for "scu" on the label" not really necessary as the ammonium sulfate is cheap, works fine, and easy to find.

    you can find from your county agent or gardening sites etc etc about best amounts of this to put out at a time for specific crops but i use about 6 lbs +- a tad per 1000 sq ft. of 21-0-0. this will put about a pound of pure N per 1000 sq ft. on the ground.
     
  8. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

    Messages:
    5,444
    State:
    Henderson,Ky
    lb is fine for a lawn but a vegetable garden is a little different. Will take a little more to make it work, will find out more tommorow if I find out what will planted the most in this garden.
     
  9. justwannano

    justwannano Active Member

    Messages:
    1,003
    State:
    SE Iowa
    My garden is just a couple rows of this and a couple rows of that.
    If we need to can tomatos I plant a few more tomato plants.Same with peas or beans.
    I don't plant corn because we are given more than we can use.
    If there is a site that tells the requirements for specific veggies i would be interested.
    What I need most is an explaination of how to figure the amount of 32%N to incorporate on a general basis.
    One of the uses of 32 is in transplanting. Its mixed a tablespoon or 2 per gallon and a cup of the liquid is poured around the transplants.but this doesn't tell me how much to spray on an entire garden.
    thanks
    just
     
  10. vlparrish

    vlparrish New Member

    Messages:
    1,276
    State:
    Bedford, Kentucky
    justwannaknow, I would lay down a 50 pound bag of ammonia nitrate at time to till the garden. It is possible to overdo a piece of ground with nitrogen, but unlikely. As was mentioned, nitrogen doesn't normally hang around long. So what I would do is after a month or so after planting I would side dress with a good amount of ammonia nitrate. It is best if you do this before a rain, just lay down a small line around the plant and then just till it in with a tiller or hoe. Corn and tomatoes are nitrogen lovers, so these are the crops you want to sidedress. It would be a good idea to use the ammonia nitrate every year at the initial till, nitrogen is fast acting and doesn't hold well, so it needs to be applied every year and in a good amount. After a couple of years of this you might want to have another sample taken. Vern
     
  11. vlparrish

    vlparrish New Member

    Messages:
    1,276
    State:
    Bedford, Kentucky
    Justwannaknow, sorry I just reread where you had said you were fertilizing a 40 X 40 plot. A good rule of thumb when puttin on any type of soil enhancer is to spread it even on the ground till it looked like you were feeding chickens. Even with a plot that small I wouldn't be scared to add 25 pounds of ammonia nitrate. If you have a spreader, just set the setting on it thin and go over it a time or two. You will know when it is a good coverage by looking at the covered ground. It isn't rocket science and if the test is showing you need nitrogen , then I would say adding some whether it be a little light or a little heavy isn't gonna hurt. Vern
     
  12. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

    Messages:
    5,444
    State:
    Henderson,Ky
    Go with a light rate of amonium nitrate, till it in about a week before you plant at first like what Bayou Bear was saying then adding some more amonium nitrate a month after you plant would be good. Only put it where it is needed like, around your tomatoes, squash and, radishes ...ect.Puting it down now would be a waste of money because, it would all "leach out" before you could use it.
    As I stated before, "beans (legumes) don't need it" they make their own nitrogen.

    Yes, you can put to much down, I did it years ago and destroyed my entire garden by accident... live and learn.
     
  13. TCAT

    TCAT New Member

    Messages:
    25
    State:
    mo
    i would suggest getting some manure from local farmer or sale barn and really put it to it. i belive u can never have enough raw compost in a garden. also try a little fish emulsion remember good things come from the land and sea.:wink:
     
  14. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    For the tomatoes have you ever tried planting them in bails of wheat straw?
    I've planted tomatoes and peppers in bays of hay and wheatstraw with good results.
    Best thing to do is go ahead and get the hay or straw in the fall or winter and start fertilizing the bail.
     
  15. Kutter

    Kutter New Member

    Messages:
    5,379
    State:
    Arnold, MO
    All right, Mark, you got my attention. Could you elaborate a bit?
     
  16. JERMSQUIRM

    JERMSQUIRM New Member

    Messages:
    13,145
    State:
    il-waynesv
    wow, glad i dont have this much trouble. i just dump ashes fro wood stove in mine and lots of rabbit poo.
     
  17. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    I use coastal bermuda hay square bailed most of the time because thats what we have on the farm.
    The man I learned it from uses wheat straw. He plants 200 hills of tomatoes every year in hay.

    I get the hay in the fall or winter. Pour fertilizer on it and wet it down.
    Winter rains and snow will take care of the rest.

    Come spring I take an old butcher knife and cut a hole out in the bail to plant my potted tomatoes and peppers in.
    Leave the dirt around the roots.

    Periodically you fertilize and put your secret mater stuff on the bail and water.
    You do have to fertilize more often because it leaches out faster then it will in the ground. The advantages are no weeding, less problems with disease, cut worms, nematodes and other things that come along with soil.
    And the hay holds moisture. It also saves garden space. You can put your bails off to the side somewhere.
    First year I tried it I got my hay in the spring right before planting.
    Big mistake. That hay went through a heat.
    Every afternoon my plants would be laying belly down from the heat.
    It took alot of babying by cooling the bails down every evening with water and I did lose some plants. So get those bails now.

    Another method I've heard of is growing tomatoes upside down over a clothesline with no dirt. I've not researched into this yet but NCSU was playing around with it some years ago in their greenhouses.
    I think its called hydroponics or something like that.
     
  18. spoonfish

    spoonfish New Member

    Messages:
    3,780
    State:
    Warsaw, Mo.
    Great tip Mark, Im going to try that. My ground is allmost all rock here and short of bringing in truck loads of soil its hard to grow much. I usally do my tomatoes in big containers but the hay sounds a lot better. Thanks!
     
  19. john catfish young

    john catfish young New Member

    Messages:
    3,070
    State:
    Kentucky
    I usually spread lime every year at the recommended rate and till the soil very good. I have started using the pelleted lime and have had good results. I then use a 10-10-10 spread over the garden and tilled in good. I use rabbit manure on certain things and this works well. I also have a bag of ammonium nitrate which is 64-0-0 and I use this sparingly to side dress corn and such nitrogen loving plants. Last year was the best results I have ever acheived. I had 4 gardens in different locations in the yard. Each one gets different amounts of sunshine and some retain moisture better than others. After 25 yrs of gardening I am starting to find out what works best on my ground.:confused2:
     
  20. ldw45

    ldw45 Member

    Messages:
    487
    State:
    Illinois
    Anyone ever try a table spoon of Epson Salts around their tomatoes. An older lady in my sister's neighborhood gave her that advice.......by golly it worked....