Fall turkey hunting

Discussion in 'Turkey Hunting' started by warrior, Aug 24, 2005.

  1. I was recently asked for advice on another board on how to persue fall turkeys. First I am amazed anybody would think that I know enough to actually give advice. Second I am surprised anyone would be fool enough to want to drive themselves insane fooling with these crazy birds. For what it is worth this is the advice I gave take it for it is worth LOL.

    Sorry for the delay in responding. I haven't visited this site in awhile. First congratulations on leaving Atlanta and welcome to the Heart of Dixie. Next you are asking a very tough question. Fall turkey hunting can be the easiest form of hunting turkeys or it is graduate level work depending on whether you are after young of the year jakes or mature gobblers. Only male birds are legal in Alabama so learn to distinguish a young of the year jake from hens or jennies. Also decoys are not allowed during fall season, should be illegal during spring but that is my problem.
    Best advice is to develop your woodsmenship skills to their highest levels. Next get out there and observe the birds at close range. I used to try to get in behind a flock of birds and follow them and keep them within hearing. The basic technique is similar to spring in only one respect, that is trying to call them to the gun. The calls you will use are not the excited mating calls of spring but the lost calls (kee kee and kee kee runs) of the jakes and jennies and to a lesser extent the assembly call of the hen. With mature gobblers clucks and yelps of the old birds are what you will use and then very sparingly.
    Once you feel that your skills are at a level to attempt this take on a flock of young birds. Get as close as you can then run in like a madman whooping and hollering to scatter the flock. Make sure you get a good scatter with the birds going in all directions. Follow up on groups that fly off together. Also pay close attention that mama hen is run off as far as possible. Immediately set up at the scatter spot, many times the birds will try to regroup immediately. Usually within an half an hour. The young birds will call to each other and mama with kee kees and kee kee runs. This is the high pitched whistle of the poults the run adds a yelp or two at the end of the kee kee. Pay attention to the age of the young birds, small poults give a clear whistling kee kee and as the birds age the kee kee gets more in tune with an older birds voice. As the voice changes into an adults they start doing runs by adding yelps. By seasons end you will hear fewer kee kees and more yelping, throw in a lost call here, it is very similar to the assembly call. Like a teenager their voice is changing and will sound accordingly.
    As the birds start calling respond in kind, they should accept you as one of them and assemble at your location. Be aware that mama will also be trying to rally her flock and will be giving the assembly call, a series of rapidly ascending yelps (6-12)tailing off into two or three falling off yelps. You don't stand a chance against mama as the birds know her voice. You are left with the options of trying to out call her (poor odds), hope she comes your way pulling birds with her (real fun trying to take a jake with mama standing nearby) or my preference get up and run her off again. Also be aware of the prodigies out there, some of these jakes seem to be hatched with a skill in slipping in silently while their siblings stand out there talking. Sometimes in spite of your best efforts they will assemble nearby but not in front of the gun, you can tell this when two or more call in the same location then go silent. You might consider a rescatter.
    As to the calls to use the diaphraghm is the most versitle but can be difficult to get a good kee kee, look at single reeds or ones with thin reeds. Pin the call tight to the roof of the mouth and blow a thin stream of air until you can get a high pitched whistle then learn to modulate that into a kee kee, now add a coarse yelp or two at the end and you have the run. I often find it easier to use a slate (real slate or aluminum) and run the striker on the very outside of the surface creating a high pitch.
    Now to the graduate level, mature gobblers. These birds are quite self sufficient and are in no hurry to regroup so a scatter even though recommended is not as effective. The best scatters on gobblers is at flyup time as it gives them all night to calm down and be ready to regroup at dawn the next morning. Sometimes these old birds are quite content to wait until tommorow or even next week to find their buddies even when they do regroup they are not very vocal doing so. Often they will only give a low key cluck or yelp just to let the others know they are still in the area. DO expect them to wander in on their own time silently. Often times the most success is just to wait quietly at the scatter point for hours if needed. I've rarely had much luck fooling with older gobblers by scattering. I've had more luck just listening for the flock and moving to a point in front of their direction of travel. I then give a couple coarse clucks and hush.
    Now I see that you say you are a deer hunter, so there are a couple things you need to unlearn. One, with deer it is often possible to move with the deer in sight (I have done this many times even walking closer) DO NOT think this is possible with a turkey. Old indian saying; Deer sees man thinks stump, turkey sees stump thinks man. Once set up have your gun up and pointed in the direction the turkey is expected minor adjustments can be made as the turkey approaches, no adjustments can be made once the bird is in sight unless it steps behind a tree or otherwise moves to where it cannot see. Be aware here often times a bird will stand just below a rise or behind a tree or shrub and periscope it's head and give the area a good once over. If it does not like what it sees say goodbye. Second thing to unlearn is that turkey are not to be ambushed like deer. Anybody can sit over a foodplot and bushwhack anything that wanders by. It takes skill to convince a bird to come to you.
    Finally one peice of advice that I give all aspiring turkey men, Turkey hunting has never ever been about killing turkeys it is about meeting him on his terms and winning. You don't have to kill him to win. Good luck, David.
     
  2. ASASIN

    ASASIN New Member

    Messages:
    345
    State:
    Lawson Missouri
    Guess I can brag then. LOL!!!!!!!!!! Have limited out on fall toms for as long as I can remember. Course I am a turkey fanatic and wouldn't have it any other way, I love to study the ins and outs of turkey habits. I'll share a few of my secrets one day soon. God bless.
     

  3. ASASIN

    ASASIN New Member

    Messages:
    345
    State:
    Lawson Missouri
    Yeah, you can't share "all" of your secrets. LOL!!!!!!!!! I forgot that back in 2000 I only got one gobbler with a gun and 2 with a bow. I ended up shooting a hen that fall because she had spurs!!!!!!!!!! I couldn't believe it when I saw them and shot her. They were about 5/8-3/4" long. I do ALOT of turkey hunting around the country every spring traveling and videoing. I work for a turkey call company and we are working on our first video. I got ALOT of kills on video, but they want everyone on the pro staff to be on the video, and no one else filmed any of the other guys killing birds, so we won't have one this spring. Ended up calling in/watching 77 birds get killed this last spring and 51 of them were in Missouri in 20 days of hunting. My best Missouri spring to date!!!!!!!!! I hunted Alabama(toughest turkey hunting I've ever experienced, it was the south west part of the state), Mississippi, Arkansas, Kansas, Texas, Missouri, and Nebraska. This year I will travel EVERYWHERE!!!!!! LOL!!!!!!!!!!! I can't get enough of turkey hunting, it's in my blood. My favorite thing to do, with catfishing coming a close second, then duck/goose hunting. God bless.
     
  4. cliffey07

    cliffey07 New Member

    Messages:
    112
    State:
    Redding, California
    have any of you guys tried the jake gobble call, i dont know exactly what it is called but its a long tube that you shake and it makes a jake gobble, during this past fall season i went home and my old man took me hunting and was calling for me he made a series of clucks and then some plucks,after that got the toms attention, he did that jake gobble and that tom came running just as pissed as can be. I wound up getting a tom with a double 9 inch beard. Just wanted to share that product and see if anyone else has heard of it, cause it was my first time ever seeing one out of my 10 years hunting the long beards.
     
  5. ASASIN

    ASASIN New Member

    Messages:
    345
    State:
    Lawson Missouri
    Yes, I've seen the call you're talking about. It has it's time and place. It is a dangerous call to use in the woods, especially if it sounds realistic or is done around beginning turkey hunters that might think it's a gobbler. Glad to see someone is as pumped up about turkey hunting as I am Wolfman!!!!!!!!! I have entered Cabela's turkey calling contest the past two years and have won it both years as well. I believe turkey hunting for me is 50% calling and 50% woodsmanship. You can take a good woodsman who can't call a lick and a champion caller who doesn't know anything about the woods, though, and the woodsman will come out on top more often than the caller. But for me it's 50/50. As for the poults, my gosh they are EVERYWHERE!!!!!!!!!!!! Each year I keep saying there is no way we'll have a better hatch. Yeah, right. LOL!!!!!!!!!!!! This past spring there were so many jakes!!!!!!!!!!!! Gets more and more excited every year!!!!!!!!!!! LOL!!!!!!!!!!! I hunt north of Kansas City approximately 60 miles, and I'm sure this area has more turkeys per acre than about anywhere in the country. I've seen fall flocks numbering 500+ and I'll go a mile down the road and see another one numbering 300. It's amazing how many we have around here. Where exactly are you at and not seeing any poults? Central Missouri? God bless.
     
  6. brian sax

    brian sax New Member

    Messages:
    187
    State:
    shawnee kansas
    a couple years ago we used that gobble call when they were hung up, then when they heard that they came runnin. IT WAS AWESOME. i was wondering if they have turkey calling contest for people like me, im 15. i think i am good enough to do that. i love turkey hunting!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  7. ASASIN

    ASASIN New Member

    Messages:
    345
    State:
    Lawson Missouri
    Brian, yes, they have contests for kids your age. Matter of fact, Cabela's has a youth division along with the men's division. They usually have it the first week or two of March. You can usually find out about contest information on the NWTF website. God bless.
     
  8. cook

    cook New Member

    Messages:
    1,494
    State:
    Plattsburg,Mo.(near K.C.)
    Poults everywhere up here-until the season,then the only ones I'll see are from the road :(
     
  9. brian sax

    brian sax New Member

    Messages:
    187
    State:
    shawnee kansas
    im aboout to buy a remington 870. any of you guys use them for turkey. what brand of choke do you prefure to use (on any gun)
    fall season opens today.
     
  10. ASASIN

    ASASIN New Member

    Messages:
    345
    State:
    Lawson Missouri
    Have alot of friends that use the 870. They like to use the Kick's Gobbling Thunder choke tubes in theirs. God bless.
     
  11. crazy

    crazy New Member

    Messages:
    2,090
    State:
    Kansas CIty, MO
    Do you just live in some magic section of the state? Last years hatch was bad, they say this year is worse. Although it does seem that northern missouri's hatch this year is better. Still not seeing the babies like in years past. Missouri has not had a bumper hatch in awhile though over all.
     
  12. ASASIN

    ASASIN New Member

    Messages:
    345
    State:
    Lawson Missouri
    Naw, I'm just in the woods more than 99.99% of the population this time of the year and actually see the turkeys first hand, instead of driving around checking out turkey populations like the majority of the people that do the surveys for the conservation. The places I've checked are 50 miles North and slightly east of Kansas City and everywhere I've went thus far I've seen poults thick!!!!!!!! It is amazing!!!!! If there is a turkey heaven, it's Missouri for sure. God bless.
     
  13. SSG Johnson

    SSG Johnson New Member

    Messages:
    638
    State:
    Saint Robert Missouri
    I would agree that last year the hatch wasnt as good as the year before here at my house but with that said the ones that where hatched I didnt see any jakes in that bunch just a lot of hens. This year I have noticed a lot of jakes at least ten that I have seen and less hens. I cant wait for the Spring but I cant wait for the rut to start getting geared up either......
     
  14. brian sax

    brian sax New Member

    Messages:
    187
    State:
    shawnee kansas
    i was wondering if a hen tasted just as good ar better than a jake, since this year will be my first fall hunt i was thinking about taking a hen.
     
  15. VerotiK

    VerotiK New Member

    Messages:
    230
    State:
    Harrison, Arkansas
    This spring was my first year turkey hunting. Im already hooked. It was alot of fun. THe only thing that bummed me out was, the toms only gobbled the first day of season, i didnt hear another gobble for the rest of the time. I did end up killing a jake with a 3" beard. I heard some turkeys when i was bowhunting last weekend, hope to see some this fall. Our turkey archery season here in arkansas is from Oct 1st through Feb 15th, so im sure i'll get one as much time as i spend in the woods.
     
  16. ASASIN

    ASASIN New Member

    Messages:
    345
    State:
    Lawson Missouri
    Hens are delicious!!!!!!!!!! You can't go wrong harvesting a hen for table fare. Here's how well the poults fared in our area: Yesterday while scouting I saw over 200 poults while out hunting. They were everywhere!!!!!!!! God bless.
     
  17. brian sax

    brian sax New Member

    Messages:
    187
    State:
    shawnee kansas
    i was out at my uncles the other night and we were seting up a tree stand for deer. he has a tree farm in his backyard thats ok sized. well we were standing there and all of a sudden we heard gobbles everywhere. it was weird because i didnt even know there were turkeys out there. i cant hunt them though because its within city limits and we are not supposed to be deer hunting there but the deer ruin his trees from there scrapes so we need to hunt back there. some big bucks too. just thought i would share that.
     
  18. phillip puryear

    phillip puryear New Member

    Messages:
    71
    State:
    NC
    hey guys i have never been turkey hunting dont really care to much for it when i was younger we had to kill and clean them for our neighbor he raised them for 5 years i guess that is why i dont like it its to much work but this year where i am deer hunting i cant even keep corn on the ground i can easily walk 8-10 yards beside them and they dont even run they walk just fast enough so i cant grab them there are only 14 of them how in the hell do you get rid of them without killing them 2 toms and 12 hens
     
  19. ASASIN

    ASASIN New Member

    Messages:
    345
    State:
    Lawson Missouri
    The very best way would be to have me come and help you with the problem. ;) If you fire off a shot it may spook them away, but they'll come right back. It would take persistant spooking every day, along with shooting, to discourage them from eating the corn, and you can't be there at all times either. God bless.