EZ Clips

Discussion in 'Alternative Methods of Catching Catfish' started by MissUL8R, Jul 24, 2009.

  1. MissUL8R

    MissUL8R New Member

    Messages:
    13
    State:
    Center Ridge, Arkansas
    Anybody use them? Good or Bad.
     
  2. Deepwater1

    Deepwater1 New Member

    Messages:
    151
    State:
    Toccoa, GA
    I just started using them. They appear to be cotter pins, professionally bent into trotline clips. Clever idea, wish I'd thought of it. So far, I've had no problem with energetic or larger cats pulling them loose.

    They work good with the 1/0 swivels I use, however they are difficult to remove from the swivel when you have a 10 lb cat on. My solution was to make a "T" handled hook (a 7/0 saltwater hook with the barb removed and point blunted. This is fastened to a 3/4" CPVC handle).

    The handle allows me to have the mainline (#72 braided nylon) in my left hand and use the hook in my right hand to catch the eye of the EZ Clip with the modified 7/0 hook and jerk upward. Result: fish is still on the drop and I have the drop connected to the "T" handle in my right hand, not the trotline. No problem to net the fish or just bring it into the boat with the "T" handle. Main thing is less danger of getting yourself hooked on the trotline. My 12" drops are 6' to 7' apart. I HATE getting hooked or finned.

    The clips are the easiest way I've found to add/remove drops from mainline. As I said they seem to be strong enough and of good design, but again I've just started using them. Mine are less than one month old, so we'll see what time tells. Perhaps someone has had more experience using them.

    Sorry such a long reply. Takes a lot longer to tell than to use. :eek:oooh::big_smile: I'll post pictures, IF anyone is interested in the setup.

    Curt
     

  3. MissUL8R

    MissUL8R New Member

    Messages:
    13
    State:
    Center Ridge, Arkansas
    Deepwater, i would like to see some pics if you don't mind. Thanks Mike
     
  4. outdoors1988

    outdoors1988 New Member

    Messages:
    213
    State:
    Oklahoma
    i have used them for a while and they work good for me
     
  5. Catmanblues

    Catmanblues New Member

    Messages:
    2,224
    State:
    S.E Ohio
    Interesting to say the least. Never tried this method but it has caught my attention.
     
  6. hct236

    hct236 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,833
    State:
    virginia
    I have used them and they do work pretty good. I made my own out of some 1/8 x 3 inch cotter pins. all you do is grab the cotter pin in the middle with some needle nose pliers and then bend over itself. But they are pretty cheap so I usually just buy them.
     
  7. Deepwater1

    Deepwater1 New Member

    Messages:
    151
    State:
    Toccoa, GA
    Mike, I'm really rushed today. I'll take some pics this evening and post them at that time. Curt :big_smile:
     
  8. Deepwater1

    Deepwater1 New Member

    Messages:
    151
    State:
    Toccoa, GA
    It didn't take as long as I thought to catch bait (bullheads) for tomorrow, so here are a couple pics.

    1st Pic: #60 Braided Nylon Main with a knot tied on either side of pony beads (WallyWorld), on either side of 1/0 swivel (nylonnet.com, Roscoe Nickel Crane Swivel-$8.40/100). Drops on this line is spaced at 7’ apart, 50 hook trotline length is about 400’ to 410’, a little over a pound of nylon. The drops are 12” long, 100 lb Dacron and the hooks are 4/0 Matzuo Sickle Octopus, Up Eye, Black Chrome, (captainhookswarehouse.com, $22.80/100 - $25.00/100 at Wild Wolf.) (I like them, they stick and hold good) Those are just the items I use, not pushing the companies or the products. They work for me and are usually cheaper than other sites.

    2nd Pic: I’m a Florida boy. I still like the Lake Okeechobee way of trotlining. The green beads are where I attach a float (8 oz to 12 oz buoyancy on a 12” drop) and the red beads are where a sinker (16 oz to 24 oz lead bank sinker on a 12” drop) gets attached. Either a float or sinker every 7 hooks (about 50'), it gives the hooks more depth variance. I use long line clips for the sinkers and floats, faster and easier on and off. Sometimes I forget which I put on last, so the green and red beads help me remember. When you’re setting 600 to a thousand hooks a night on Okeechobee, something has to help you remember. The floats and sinkers keep the line really tight. I use a cinder block at both ends, attached to a separate 3/8” braided poly rope, with a 8-1/2” crab trap buoy up top, with my name and address. Poly rope is easier to pull the block up and lower it down. Instead of just dropping the block. I make the ropes slightly longer than the water depth.

    Pic #3: I store the lines in one gal ice cream tubs (Wally World). This tub has two lines in it, 100 swivels. The lead end of each one is tied to the handle. A bucket can hold 3 trotlines of 50 swivels each. They feed out without a problem. I used to use jump boxes, but using the clips, I didn't want to chance a hang-up, so I use the bucket.

    This line was made for a friend and is a little lighter mainline than I normally use, #60 vs #72 or #84, but everything else is the same as my trotlines. I also soak them in a dye overnight and dry in the sun before I use them.
    My neighbor borrowed my “Clip Removal” Handle to use tonight, so I’ll take some pics when he brings it back tomorrow and post them later. I’ll also post pics of the PVC rollers I’m making for a friend’s boat.

    I went a little overboard on explanation, but I hope it helps someone.

    Curt
     
  9. Rtpcat

    Rtpcat New Member

    Messages:
    72
    State:
    Alabama
    Hey Deepwater1,
    Thanks for the extra detail and explanation, some of us like details and such.
     
  10. oahegw

    oahegw Member

    Messages:
    132
    State:
    So. Dakota
    ****

    Thanks for the great post. Will be anxious to see the photo of the "Hook removal Handle".

    ****