Exotics in the wild

Discussion in 'Big Game Hunting' started by ladyfish50, Oct 6, 2009.

  1. ladyfish50

    ladyfish50 New Member

    Messages:
    4,182
    State:
    Louisiana
    With all the exotic ranches in Texas, & further out west, I've been thinking. You KNOW some of those animals get out from behind the high fences. And apparently most of them, such as Blackbuck Antelope, various wild rams/goats, Fallow, Axis & Sika deer, Red Stags, etc, seem to adapt really well to the climate & weather conditions. I think it's feasible that in the next 15-20 years we could have wild free-roaming herds of some of these. I, for one, think it would be wonderful...if the populations are kept in check. Imagine getting to hunt for exotics without the high price of the ranches!
    What do any of the rest of you think about this?
     
  2. Buddrice

    Buddrice New Member

    Messages:
    4,032
    State:
    Louisiana
    I can see where there will be Exotics in the wild one day but I think it is going to several years down the road.:wink:
     

  3. phase5supply

    phase5supply New Member

    Messages:
    126
    State:
    Hope Mills, NC
    Aoudads were released in Texas in the late 50"s, they have done real well. There are free range heards. I have never hunted them but have a few friends that do and they enjoy it a lot. Maybe one day I will go with them:big_smile:
     
  4. wareagle

    wareagle New Member

    Messages:
    3,447
    State:
    Louisiana
    If they let them out I will hunt them. My wifes grandpaw had some white deer he got from Texas and if I remember right a few of them got out about 70 miles from here. I also heard about an ostrich(spelling) one time down close to Stonewall a few years ago. What would you do if you saw that long necked thing coming down through the woods?:smile2::smile2:
     
  5. THE PAN MAN

    THE PAN MAN New Member

    Messages:
    1,213
    State:
    hartsburg mo.
    td be a trip wouldent it. :eek:oooh:
     
  6. ladyfish50

    ladyfish50 New Member

    Messages:
    4,182
    State:
    Louisiana
    Dibs on the drumstick!!!!:tounge_out:
     
  7. THE PAN MAN

    THE PAN MAN New Member

    Messages:
    1,213
    State:
    hartsburg mo.
    thats funny roxie. ill try it with ya.:smile2:
     
  8. Jeremy Sheffey

    Jeremy Sheffey New Member

    Messages:
    2,388
    State:
    Columbus, Ohio
    i wouldn't mind hunting a wild free ranging version of the exotics in the US but the high fence version i wouldn't care to. we have a game ranch not to far from me here in KY and they had a bunch of goats they needed killed off. my friend (we'll call him B-Rob) B-Rob was asked by the owner if he would like to shoot one for him, at a discounted price. B-Rob did and he killed a nice Goat too, the problem he said was it was so easy it wasn't that much fun. He reported that when he located the goat he basically walked up to it and shot it at 15 yds with a long bow. He said that it was worth it for an almost free experience but that was all he thought of it. Were they are kept in the cages, fed and around people all the time they loose the fear.
     
  9. Igottheblues!

    Igottheblues! New Member

    Messages:
    2,119
    State:
    Minden, Louisia
    Reminds me of a story my uncle told me last year. His son-in-law invited him to go to Wyoming with him and he would get to shoot an elk " free of charge ". The son-in-laws parents ran this ranch for this rich dude, and said they had some culling that needed to be done, so surely my uncle said he'd oblidge. They got to the ranch and my uncle said there were these magnificent bulls with racks six feet tall, and wide as truck hoods, all enclosed in this five or ten acre pasture. This guy comes in and says, ' I want to kill a BIG ELK ! They tell him to look out back and pick one out. He says, " No, I want to really hunt it like it's in the WILD. So, They turn it loose into a wooded enclosure this time. Well, About three days later he comes back and says: Can you hem him in for me a little bit....$10.000.00 to shoot an elk....lol....I guess if you got, you might as well blow it.....:big_smile:
     
  10. BubbaCat

    BubbaCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,869
    State:
    Arizona
    with all the hiker's camper's and farmers in the woods even wild animals become oblivious to hunters.
     
  11. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    There are several exotics here in my home state that are now considered game animals,IMO they should have liscence free shooting of them ALL. oryx,auodad,ibex ,Game dept cry's about lack of hunter participation,but charges upwards of 300.00 for a "once in a lifetime hunt" ,Meanwhile our MULE DEER herd suffers tragically.:angry:
     
  12. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    That comes with it's own set of problems.
    Farmers have a tough enough time with deer grazing.
    Most of your southern states are sporting massive herds of whitetail already and that herd is costing farmers and those with auto insurances billions in damage.
    I'm all for it if we enact state regulations that will force herd thinning of what we have already in the form of mandatory doe tag fills before an antlered animal can be taken. All this horn hunting going on just aint getting the job done.

    Folks easily get hung up on more is better instead of quality in what you got.
     
    Last edited: Oct 6, 2009
  13. mintaka

    mintaka Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,471
    State:
    Charlotte , N.C
    It may upset the local ecosystem.
    But I would imagine it would be nice. Just as long as no dangerous animals are in the mix. There was a guy a few years back proposing releasing lions and tigers in the Plains , following 'depopulation' of human settlements. He also proposed cloning sabretooth tigers and other ancient predators for what he referred to as the 'rewilding of North America'!! He , in my opinion , must have had some gooooooooood hooch!!
     
    Last edited: Oct 7, 2009
  14. SGTREDNECK

    SGTREDNECK New Member

    Messages:
    1,522
    State:
    Tennessee
    I have seen Orix(spelling?) in the wild in Texas. I was told that they are from Africa and they escaped from a ranch and now there is a huge population and they now have hunts for them. I thought they were pretty cool. Almost got in trouble for tring to run one down with a Humvee. I was over 30 days into MREs so i wanted real meat.
     
  15. BowieKnife357

    BowieKnife357 New Member

    Messages:
    514
    State:
    Kansas
    I'm pretty dead set against any type of introduction of non-native wildlife into an area. I could go into a long analysis about it, but I'll spare you guys unless you really want me too. Always seems like a good idea at first, then a few years down the road you realize how severe of a problem it is for native wildlife, that are already either in competition with domestic stock, or their numbers are already too high from a modern day lack of apex predators (human hunters don't count, sorry guys) that they have eaten down available foliage faster than it can regenerate. The balanced eco-system is a fragile thing. It can't handle the stress of alien wildlife on top of the stresses it's already enduring. Rusty crayfish, feral hogs, snakeheads, zebra mussels, africanized/killer bees..all came from somewhere else, and have had a drastic impact on native species. I personally don't beleive in hunting a high fence anyway, but I'm not going to hold it against anyone that does, different strokes for different folks. But like I have been getting to, a high fence is one thing, free ranging invasive/feral/alien/non-indigenous is another. No bueno.
     
  16. ladyfish50

    ladyfish50 New Member

    Messages:
    4,182
    State:
    Louisiana
    Thanks for all the feed back so far. Stuart, those are all very good points that I hadn't even considered. Yes, our predator population is down, so any new species could very easily push our native animals further to the brink.
     
  17. massa_jorge

    massa_jorge New Member

    Messages:
    2,137
    State:
    TEXAS
    we have free range sitka deer, aoudad, mouflon, fallow deer, hogs, and feral goats here. they have been here a long time. we also have a really healthy whitetail, mule deer, and pronghorn antelope population. the exotics are fair game anytime, and they are a blast to hunt. they are really timid and hard to stalk, which makes it more fun. if yall ever get the chance, aoudad are the hardest and most rewarding to hunt, and they make good sausage. i have never seen an exotic lose its fear of humans, probably because they know they have a big red 'x' on their back!
     
  18. Buddrice

    Buddrice New Member

    Messages:
    4,032
    State:
    Louisiana
    Our predator count is not that low,The state of Louisiana started allowing the deer hunters to shoot one Bobcat a year during deer season.Our coyotes are really thriving and there is no limit on them.Both of these animals play havoc on deer,turkeys,quail,etc.The state now gives us three doe tags and three buck tags trying to get the hunters to shoot more does instead of shooting deer with antlers.The biggest problem I see is all the wildlife lands being turned into subdivisions and shopping malls which are pushing the animals where they have to survive in the fields of the farmers because that is just about all they have left.I use to live in the country and now there is a Brookshires next to my house which was all woods when I was growing up.I do feel sorry for the farmers but I also feel sorry for the animals.My wife and I feed four Red Foxes every evening and they are so cool to watch.We need to do less building and more tree planting..
     
  19. BowieKnife357

    BowieKnife357 New Member

    Messages:
    514
    State:
    Kansas
    Your bobcat/coyote numbers may not be that low, but I was referring to what are called apex (as in top of the food chain) predators. Cougars, wolves, grizzly bears, the ones that are no longer common in the lower 48, and are formerly the top of the food chain. Coyotes and bobcats may prey on yearlings, but they aren't going to bring down a full size, healthy deer/elk/any other hooved wildlife, I promise you that. I agree with you on the fact that wildlife habitat is being lost due to urban expansion and development, and therefore taking a toll on numbers of some species, and that is not something to be overlooked, but I was on a different subject. Deer numbers, regardless of what anyone will tell you, are nearly beyond biotic carrying capacity in many areas. That doesn't mean you are more likely to shoot a trophy. It means there are flat out too many deer of all sizes. Most human hunters target mature males. Take a male out of the population, another one moves in. Once sexually mature a doe will produce 1-2 offspring per year, and it doesn't matter which buck fertilizes. Have you ever seen virgin forest or grazing land? No, you havn't. I'm sorry, but you havn't unless you are a part of a virgin forest restoration project, which involves planting of indigenious foliage in areas inaccessible to herbivores. Think about the next time you are in the woods. How much thorn brush is there? How many other inedibles are there? I have seen first hand from Kansas to Texas, the answer is there is more inedible foliage than edible. You may ask why. The answer is because deer have eaten down the edible succulents faster than they can regenerate, and therefore over years the regenerative growth has been replaced by inedible plants. That is a huge reason that deer rely on agricultural plots to eat. You are more likely to kill a deer in a corn field than in a wooded area nowadays, and that's why. With that kind of pressure, the last thing we need are non-native species eating up the same food that sustains native population. In effect, one could almost make the argument that our deer conservation programs have almost worked too good, but that is neither here nor there. Didn't mean to get off on a tangent like that, but I got a little riled. Yall have a good evening! :wink:
     
  20. BubbaCat

    BubbaCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,869
    State:
    Arizona
    We have pleanty of mt lions and wolves here in Arizona, not many exotics, they are considered none game and you can shoot even without a license.