Evinrude 9.9 hidden sparkplugs

Discussion in 'Bubba's Outboards' started by Star1pup, Aug 22, 2005.

  1. Star1pup

    Star1pup New Member

    Messages:
    14
    State:
    Ohio
    I posted this on the other BOC, but thought it a good idea to post it here.

    My 2001 Evinrude 9.9, 4-stroke has a bottom plug that seems impossible to reach without some sort of special wrench. Is this right? It is below the casing after the shroud is removed and there are other motor parts in the way.
     
  2. Bobpaul

    Bobpaul New Member

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    3,039
    State:
    Supply NC
    Bill, I worked for an evinrude dealer until about 8 months ago and I never saw a 9.9 4 stroke Evinrude. I'm not saying they aren't out there, I'm just saying he never sold one, so I'm not sure how you'd get to the spark plug.

    I do know that there were small tool kits given with some of the evinrude 4 stroke motors, They had plug wrenches in them.

    BTW, they're Suzuki engines. I don't doubt one bit that they've complicated the changing of a simple spark plug.
     

  3. Star1pup

    Star1pup New Member

    Messages:
    14
    State:
    Ohio
    Bobpaul, Thanks for the input. Yes. It is a 2001 9.9, 4-stroke. Says so right on the shroud and in the manual. It really runs well, except for a loss of power when I troll too long. The darn throttle is a Yamaha as the boat originally included a 25 hp Yamaha, but I got a better deal if I took a 1-year old Evinrude. The throttle has a couple of notches that it falls into so I don't have a smooth progression of speeds. The 9.9 is a better choice on Atwood Lake anyhow, and it hardly uses any gas. Thant's a good thing with this summer's prices. :D
     
  4. IndianaGal

    IndianaGal New Member

    Messages:
    2
    State:
    Indiana
    Bill Harding, Star1Pup and Bob Gilvary, Bobpaul....did you ever find a resolution to this problem?

    I have the same issue: My 2001 Evinrude 9.9, 4-stroke has a bottom plug that seems impossible to reach without some sort of special wrench. Is this right? It is below the casing after the shroud is removed and there are other motor parts in the way.

    Is there a special tool to use to get to this plug....I have tried every which way to get to it. Please help if you can.

    Thanks,

    IndianaGal
     
  5. tbull

    tbull New Member

    Messages:
    3,318
    State:
    SW Ohio
    My 94 evinrude 112 is kind of the same way, usually I have to get a ratchet in there just to loosen it one crank, then fight the ratchet back out and do the rest by hand. Seems like if I loosen it more than 1 crank I cant even get the ratchet out.:smile2::confused2:
     
  6. psychomekanik

    psychomekanik New Member

    Messages:
    2,534
    State:
    Illinois
    The special socket that the engine came with is about the easiest tool to use. It was a stamped steel socket that was hexagon in shape. It had a couple holes through one end of it so you can insert a rod through it and break it loose. some of them were a hex shape from top to bottom so you could slip a slimline wrench over it and use the wrench anywhere on the socket. Good luck finding one. They never seem to stay with the engines.
     
  7. IndianaGal

    IndianaGal New Member

    Messages:
    2
    State:
    Indiana
    So what is the solution? There must be a special tool. I watched a mechanic from the local marina change the plugs on my Evinrude 9.9 with no problem, but did not/could not see what type of a tool he was using it was so quick. If there is a special tool, what is it, and where does one get it?

    Thanks for any input.

    IndianaGal
     
  8. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

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    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    Sometimes you just gotta make the tool you need. This might be one of those times.
     
  9. BKS72

    BKS72 New Member

    Messages:
    3,361
    State:
    East of KC
    You got me curious so I looked all over the internet and couldn't find any mention of a special tool for a 9.9 sparkplug. Have you asked your local dealer?

    Or as Dave said, get the saw and welder out. I've got several custom tools laying around that were made for various applications. Some of them I spent more time making than it took me to do the job I made 'em for:smile2: