Ethics as the most important part of the hunt

Discussion in 'Deer Hunting' started by wolfman, Dec 2, 2005.

  1. wolfman

    wolfman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,081
    State:
    Triadelphia, WV
    Name:
    Walter Flack
    Ive been seeing a lot of posts on bad hunting ethics and wanted to share my thoughts. Ethics are the most important part of hunting, and the same message is crucial for hunters everywhere in the country today. If people want to protect the privilege of hunting, they must do everything possible to eliminate discourteous and irresponsible behavior, and they must follow a strict code of ethics including:

    Placing the safety of other people far above every other consideration

    Showing flawless courtesy toward landowners and nonhunters;

    Taking all possible measures to prevent animals from suffering or being wounded or lost;

    Wasting no usable part of any animal;

    Only hunting for animals that will be thoroughly, respectfully utilized.


    We as hunters must remain united and we can do that only when our hunting is ethical. Your hunt is still your hunt. Just remember that however you pursue deer - whether it's by archery, primitive weapons, or gun-still , poor ethics on some people's part affects all deer hunters. The bottom line is that our actions as deer hunters must continue to keep non-hunters positive toward our sport. If we alienate these people and turn them into anti-hunters because of poor ethics on our part, we have failed.
    My views on hunting, my sense of ethics, my sense of hunter behavior , and my expectations of myself and of those I hunt with are all products of my experiences in the field. With a measure of reading, discussion, and fireside debate thrown in for seasoning. I was taught to hunt for the joy of hunting and for the deep satisfaction of having hunted well, not for the bag; to take pride in my outdoor skills more than in my kill; to respect wild game; to know the land where I hunt; to study the game, learn to read the woods, and work with my hands to improve habitat; and to expect other hunters to do pretty much the same.I think those were good lessons, good lessons for living as well as for hunting. This is my understanding and love of nature, my own joy in hunting, a place to hunt, and a society that permits it.
     
  2. okiecop

    okiecop New Member

    Messages:
    265
    State:
    Grove, OK
    Wolfman, i can't agree with you any more. Great post. I just wish everyone that hunts, fishes or traps would take this to heart.
     

  3. T-Bone

    T-Bone New Member

    Messages:
    1,125
    State:
    South of Dallas
    Five stars to ya there Wolfman & Baitfish ! Good post guys !
     
  4. hookeye

    hookeye New Member

    Messages:
    162
    State:
    Kentucky
    *****.......Excellent post Walter.......*****
    You have certainly been taught as I was, Hunting is a privledge and a right that should not be destroyed by ignorance. It is our responsibility as knowledgable, respectable hunters with as much love for the hunt, land, preparation and proper education, as we have for our intended game. To share our love, knowledge and experiences with others that they too will develop the same love and respect for all of the outdoors.

    I once took a young man out on a squirrel hunting trip. As we were walking to the woods across a grown up field, I tripped over a hidden log in all the under brush. I suffered several good bruises and cuts due to the fact that I did not in anyway try to break my fall. The fellow asked me why I did not try to stop or protect myself to avoid injury. I replied," I am carrying a loaded gun and was more concerned about your safety than that of my own, so when I started down I wanted to make sure that I had a good grip on my gun and threw my arms straight out in front of me so if the gun went off it would be well away from your direction." The young fella shook his head in disbelief at what he had just witnessed and said he would never have had given a thought to that, but that he certainly learned something very valuable and that he would be more on his toes about safety in the field from that time on.

    Didn't mean to ramble on so.... but it sure is a great feeling when you have the opportunity to teach someone something valuable that will stick with them a lifetime and who knows, may save a life.
     
  5. Leakyboat

    Leakyboat New Member

    Wolfman,
    Your exactly right,common sense and ethic's,whether it's hunting,fishing,playing golf,or what ever.That's why it burns me up,when i go to the lake,an find someone left their trash everywhere,or your duck hunting public land,an find somebody's hulls and empty shell boxes on the ground.I didn't come here to pick up your trash.
    In my opinion,which might be worth about .02cents,if you don't have morals and ethics when outdoors,you probably don't use them anytime,whether at work or raising a family!
    Leakyboat

    Bill,that's a nice fish in your profile picture!
     
  6. wolfman

    wolfman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    9,081
    State:
    Triadelphia, WV
    Name:
    Walter Flack
    Bill, I have to admire your safety instincts, that guy you took hunting will probably never forget that ever.
    Ive never forgot when I played basketball in high school, coach would bench me if I took a shot longer than 10 feet from the basket. Sure it offended me and made me mad at the time when he told me I really was a terrible shooter outside of 10 feet but I already new that in the back of my mind just not mature enough to admit it. I didnt score very often but when I did it was always under 10 feet away and 9 out of 10 shots would go in. At the end of that season,coach showed me and the team all the stats for the year and I was far from the most points scored but was 1st in highest percentage scoring and rebounds. That taught me what kind of person I wanted to be along with other lessons that I have learned in life.
     
  7. Chanellocked

    Chanellocked New Member

    Messages:
    108
    State:
    Lake St. Louis, MO
    I was raised as a nonhunter, but my folks loved the the outdoors. They always enstilled in my brother and me outdoor ethics like leaving your campsite cleaner then you then you found it. Now both my brother and I are hunters, we practice those same ethics when comes to hunting, I was lucky enough to have ethical hunting friends to learn from. For me the best part of the hunt is the time spent in the woods with good friends. I've been hunting for 4 years now and I took my 1st deer last year with one of my closest friends, and my 1st buck this year with my brother, but still have plenty to learn. I'm new to this site and so far, I like what I'm readin'...Good Luck and safe hunting...
     
  8. nosnag

    nosnag New Member

    Messages:
    284
    State:
    Florida
    I used to bowhunt a lot.I plan to return to it again this coming year. My major complaint is that there are both gun and bowhunters that take their weapons out the first day of the season without practice, from the year before and go hunting. To be a real hunter it takes practice-practice-practice. You are as good of a shot as you are,not as good as you think you are.
    At this point of time I would'nt even think of grabbing my bow and hunting any animal. We all need more respect for them than that.Until I can hit where I am aiming in all positions,my bow will only be used on targets.We all have to instill this on people we know that fail to do this.
    To all the good hunters out there I wish the best of luck and enjoyment of the sport.
    Bill