EHD & Bluetongue ?

Discussion in 'Deer Hunting' started by bootshowl, Sep 24, 2007.

  1. bootshowl

    bootshowl New Member

    Messages:
    2,288
    State:
    Indiana, J
    DNR for Indiana put up a short article on their site, that EHD had been confirmed in one county, and test results awaiting for 5 or 6 others. May be the biggest outbreak of record. Another article I read said the disease is in 15 states now.....
    How is that going to affect our hunting? Is it going to be safe to hunt? Am I correct in thinking this is "hoof & mouth desease" for deer? Please chime in. The articles I was able to pull up were very technical of nature, not for the hunter. Word on the street is hunting in some counties of Indiana will not be allowed, period. Been a heck of a year. Heat records, drought, & now plague.
     
  2. postbeetle

    postbeetle New Member

    Messages:
    6,598
    State:
    Iowa
    Boots: Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease (EHD) Is caused by a biting fly. It is a virus, a tiny little bugger. Causes them to bleed to death. Can wipe a deer population in any given area it shows up in. Showed up in about 1955. Been outbreaks in a lot of places, many not well documented. Not the same as bluetongue. Occurs in late summer and fall. No cure, not known to transrelate to domestic stock. Supposedly not harmful to humans (ya like guns and booze aren't). If it is in your area you got trouble. Might have to come to Iowa to kills the bast***ds, we got a plague of them here. Leave the biting fly in your neck of the woods though. John.
     

  3. Big B

    Big B New Member

    Messages:
    226
    State:
    North Texas
    Thats some bad stuff. Sorry to hear that it's effecting the deer herd in your area.
     
  4. bootshowl

    bootshowl New Member

    Messages:
    2,288
    State:
    Indiana, J
    So John???? Does it pose any threat to the hunter? I'm used to looking at the lungs & liver for any abnormal spots etc. One article I looked at said there are several strains of the virus now & it takes lab work.
    Would just observing the deer for normal behavior & internals be enough, or should I just put some beef in the freezer and pass on hunting this year?
    The DNR article they posted on their website was very vague, & then I got to thinking about how much revenue they connect with; at $24 a tag. We already have to worry about TB, and chronic waste desease. I'm old enough to remember when ya didn't even think about "gloves" for field dressing, LOL.
     
  5. postbeetle

    postbeetle New Member

    Messages:
    6,598
    State:
    Iowa
    Mr Boots, Sir: Ya will probably never know. The stuff is transmitted by a biting fly during the warmer months of fall. After a frost the fly is dead and so is transmission. It takes the deer 4-5 days to show the effects of the bug. They bleed to death. Not like sticking their jugular, but like a hemophiliac, under their skin and in their organs. They are like anything that is loosing blood. Slow, lethargic and don't care whether you are around. If you see one, could be this or could be CRD or a half dozen other things. If it doesn't doesn't walk like a duck, sound like a duck or look like a duck it ain't worth wasting your tag on it. Unfortunately when you hit the woods they would have died or survived. You don't know what you are getting. Why don't you and I go into raising goats, We'll make a fortune when this country goes back to Mexico. We won't have to eat those Da$n deer anymore. John.
     
  6. buckmasterben3

    buckmasterben3 New Member

    Messages:
    20
    State:
    wv
  7. kkyyoottee

    kkyyoottee New Member

    Messages:
    754
    State:
    Iowa
    I believe it will spread like wild fire. To many deer everywhere like we can keep them from crossing state lines. This is bad news for deer herds. Mother Nature is going to make a cleansing since most dnr's arent capable of thinking straight cause they might loose some money for those new trucks they all drive. You want deer herd cut down? Give free license, Pay hunters to shoot them then give meat to prisons, and food banks. Get them back in control!!!
     
  8. billNpam

    billNpam Active Member

    Messages:
    622
    State:
    Alabama
    Below is a story that was posted in the Clarksville Tn paper on this subject. Makes for some intersting reading.
    The archery season will open for Tennessee deer hunters Saturday morning, but a cloud of uncertainty hangs over the opening day.
    First, the worst outbreak of epizootic hemorrhagic disease (EHD) to hit Middle Tennessee and Western Kentucky in recent years has killed many deer, and state wildlife biologists report that the die-off could be as high as 40 percent in some areas. OAS_AD('ArticleFlex_1'); The disease occurs periodically in Tennessee and other states, but is no threat to human health, although hunters are advised to avoid the consumption of obviously sick animals.

    EHD is a viral disease that is spread by gnats that causes internal hemorrhaging in the deer.
    As the deer begin to die, they usually head toward water because their fever makes them thirsty.
    The virus is indiscriminate and infects bucks, does and fawns alike, and that big buck you saw several weeks ago may be dead today.
    The good news is that the gnats will die after the first frost and the disease will disappear with them, at least for this year.
    The bad news is that it may be at least another month before we have a frost in the region and the disease will continue to affect deer throughout much of the first archery-only season that ends Oct. 26.
    The second cloud of uncertainty concerns the availability of food for the deer and wild turkeys this fall and winter.
    The number one food of wild turkeys throughout the year is acorns and the small fruit of the oak trees provide more than half of the annual food consumed by deer.
    The late freeze in April destroyed most of the white oak acorn production in Middle Tennessee and that could make it a hard winter for the turkey and deer.
    The freeze also hit the red oaks, but these oaks produce over a two-year cycle and we will be short on their production next year.
    "The good news is that red oaks have had a decent production of acorns (which began last year), but the bad news is that squirrels are already devouring them,"î said Russ Skoglund, a biologist with the Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency.
    "Deer will have a tough time, but they are going to find something to fill their stomachs and they will forage on foods they wouldnít normally eat when acorns are plentiful."î
    Hunters who have a stand of red oaks in their hunting area will probably do well by setting up their deer stands in these areas and waiting for the deer to come to dinner.
    I've noticed that many persimmon trees are heavy with fruit this year and they will also be a good spot to hunt deer as the fruit ripens and falls to the ground.
    The bottom line is deer surviving the EHD epidemic are going to be looking for food this winter and they will be moving more than they usually do.
    Successful hunters will have to alter their normal hunting strategies to take a deer.
    Even if we should have a 40 percent die-off from EHD, we will still have a lot of deer in Middle Tennessee. We will just have to hunt harder to tag one.
     
  9. derbycitycatman

    derbycitycatman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,296
    State:
    Kentucky
    Weve had bluetongue show up in the paper lately. From what I remember they said the deer will likely die a few days after being affected and you can tell a difference in the deers behavior. Dead carcasses will likely be found next to water. I had found a dead poached deer on my property a few weeks ago and called F@W. They were convinced it was blue tongue until I told them it had a hole in its chest. Game warden confirmed the cause of death,but Im a little peeved I got someone poaching on or near my property. At least now I got some back up that checks up on my land and should be more likely to respond quickly if I need him.
     
  10. Believer

    Believer New Member

    Messages:
    1,362
    State:
    Greenwood, AR.
    Sorry to hear that, I hope they catch him!

    Bluetongue has hit around here too. A buddy of mine has found 4 on his property and knows of a total of 25 around his area.

    Eric
     
  11. derbycitycatman

    derbycitycatman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,296
    State:
    Kentucky
    Thanks. The warden even said he had a few blue tongue deaths on his property. Im wondering if this disease is more likely to hit a high population density of deer. Ive had numerous friends say they have seen diseased deer. They seem to have alot of agriculture around them so I wonder about the population density effects. Where I hunt your lucky is you see 4-5 deer a month
     
  12. Hoolygalulith

    Hoolygalulith New Member

    Messages:
    13
    State:
    kentucky
    I just read an article in the owensboro Ky. paper saying that EHD has been found in some local cattle heards it has put a big hurtin on our deer population in this area also.
     
  13. hookeye

    hookeye New Member

    Messages:
    162
    State:
    Kentucky
    Frankfort, Ky. – The recent outbreak of epizootic hemorrhagic disease in the state’s deer herd has raised concerns among hunters. To discuss the facts about this disease and its impact, Tina Brunjes, big game coordinator with the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources, joins “Kentucky Afield” TV Host Tim Farmer this weekend, September 29 and 30.

    More than 2,000 deer have died in Kentucky this year from hemorrhagic disease, a number that seems large but is only a fraction of the state’s total deer population. Brunjes notes the disease is not transmissible to humans or pets, and suggests that landowners continue with their usual deer management plans.
     
  14. hookeye

    hookeye New Member

    Messages:
    162
    State:
    Kentucky
    here's a little more:

    Frankfort, Ky. - The Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources is investigating recent reports of white-tailed deer deaths in 11 counties, primarily in western Kentucky. Officials suspect the animals died of hemorrhagic disease.

    The most significant outbreak is in McLean County, where more than 20 deer have been reported dead. Officials have also received reports of deer deaths in Breckinridge, Christian, Daviess, Hopkins, Logan, Muhlenberg, Ohio, Simpson and Webster counties. People usually find the dead or weak and emaciated deer near water.

    “Hemorrhagic disease is caused by a virus. We see large outbreaks about every two years in Kentucky,” said Danny Watson, a wildlife biologist with the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources.

    With deer hunting seasons opening next month, hunters are concerned about the safety of eating deer that may be infected with hemorrhagic disease. Hemorrhagic disease is not infectious to humans.

    Biting gnats transmit hemorrhagic disease between deer. Hemorrhagic disease usually occurs in late summer and early fall because of the increased presence of these biting gnats. Although deer affected with the acute form of hemorrhagic disease are most often seen in late summer, deer with chronic cases can be found in winter.

    Hemorrhagic disease occurs annually in the southeastern United States, but its distribution and severity of occurrence widely varies. Less than 25 percent of the deer in a population usually die from the disease, but death rates can be higher in certain cases.

    Signs of the disease depend on the strength of the virus and length of infection in the animal. Hemorrhagic disease causes fever, labored breathing and swelling of the head, neck, tongue and eyelids. Infected deer may die within 72 hours, or they may slowly deteriorate for months from lameness and starvation. Early in the cycle of the disease, animals may show little or no sign of infection. Infected deer that survive for a period of time experience lameness, loss of appetite and greatly reduced activity.

    In some instances, outbreaks occurred simultaneously in deer, sheep and cattle. This is not due to the disease spreading from deer to livestock or vice versa, but is an indication the biting gnats are present in significant numbers to transmit disease.




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  15. hookeye

    hookeye New Member

    Messages:
    162
    State:
    Kentucky
    Signs of the disease depend on the strength of the virus and length of infection in the animal. Hemorrhagic disease causes fever, labored breathing and swelling of the head, neck, tongue and eyelids. Infected deer may die within 72 hours, or they may slowly deteriorate for months from lameness and starvation. Early in the cycle of the disease, animals may show little or no sign of infection. Infected deer that survive for a period of time experience lameness, loss of appetite and greatly reduced activity.

    Please keep in mind:
    Although they claim it poses no threat to humans through the consumption of the meat, you should never take a chance on an animal that is sick in appearance. The infected deer also salivate or drool heavily and show no sign of fear toward man. Another symptom is sunken eye balls. Should the animal be of the few that linger with the virus their belly may either swell or may look as though they are starving with the rib cage being very visible. Since the virus is spread through the bite of a gnat the first hard frost should take care of eliminating the threat for the year. However, there could still be some infected animals present. So please, pay very close attention to the animal you have chosen to harvest and if any of these symptoms are present you should use your own good judgement.

    They also say that the rotting carcass poses no threat to other wildlife and that the scavengers such as buzzards have imunity to the virus. I still think as a matter of ( It's better to be safe than sorry) I would have any and all found removed, especially if you raise live stock.

    I hope all this information helps everyone and gives a little more understanding of this virus. GOOD LUCK TO EVERYONE!

    HOOKEYE,
    Your B.O.C. Brother
     
  16. catman from owensboro

    catman from owensboro New Member

    Messages:
    569
    State:
    ky
    ownesboro area got hit hard i'm good friends with both sporting good places and they said it bad tracy had high scoring bucks die on his place. and i found just one but i've had a camera out and this year all i got is spoted fawns with no mother. last year i got 100's of deer pics. by now.
     
  17. fishnfwl

    fishnfwl New Member

    Messages:
    3,334
    State:
    South Cent
    What we all need is an early and hard freeze to rid the bugs........ Here is what the Illinois DNR has put out so far.



    Illinois Department of Natural Resources
    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
    September 9, 2007

    Virus Detected in Illinois' White Tailed Deer Population

    Animal Health Officials Say Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease is Deadly to Deer, but Poses no Risk to Humans

    SPRINGFIELD, Ill. – An outbreak of an acute, infectious virus that kills white-tailed deer has been detected in Illinois, the state Departments of Agriculture and Natural Resources reported today.
    Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease (EHD), an often-fatal virus that causes high fever and severe internal bleeding, has been confirmed in captive deer herds in Franklin and Randolph counties. It also is the suspected cause of death in wild deer in at least 28 counties throughout central and southern Illinois.

    “One farm, in particular, has been devastated,” Dr. Colleen O’Keefe, IDOA division manager of Food Safety and Animal Protection, said. “The farm, located in Franklin County, has lost 16 of its 20 deer.”

    EHD poses no risk to humans, according to Dr. O’Keefe. Other wild ruminants also are susceptible, including elk, mule deer, pronghorn antelope and bighorn sheep. Domestic animals such as livestock may become infected, but rarely exhibit signs of the disease or develop serious illness.


    EHD is spread by biting midges, or gnats. The midges transmit the virus from infected to uninfected animals as they feed. There currently is neither a vaccine nor an effective treatment for the disease. “The only viable way to control the virus is to control the insect population,” Dr. O’Keefe said. “Short of spraying for insects, there’s nothing much a landowner can do to prevent the disease other than wait for cold weather.”

    EHD outbreaks typically begin in late summer or early fall and end with an insect-killing frost. The deaths this year were first reported in late August. Officials believe the dry summer in central and southern Illinois, where the cases are concentrated, has contributed to the current outbreak. “When shallow ponds and creek beds dry up, conditions are good for hatches of disease-carrying insects,” Dr. Paul Shelton, Illinois Department of Natural Resources Forest Wildlife Program manager, said. “Then, as summer progresses, deer tend to become more concentrated around watering holes, facilitating the spread of the disease.”

    EHD was first identified in 1955 when several hundred white-tailed deer died in both Michigan and New Jersey. Since then, cases have been documented throughout much of the United States and southern Canada. The last significant outbreak in Illinois occurred in 2004, although a few cases normally are observed in any given year.

    Symptoms develop about seven days after exposure to the virus and include loss of appetite, excessive salivation, muscle weakness, lameness, depression and a rapid pulse and respiration rate. In very acute cases of the disease, animals enter a “shock-like” state, become prostrate and die within eight to 36 hours after the onset of symptoms.

    Farmers with ill deer should not assume the animals are infected with EHD, even if they are exhibiting classic symptoms. A veterinarian should be called to give the deer a check-up. If the animal dies, the Illinois Department of Agriculture’s animal disease laboratories in Centralia and Galesburg will perform a post-mortem exam to determine the cause of death. The fee for this exam ranges from $40 to $100, depending upon the level of testing that is required.

    Landowners or hunters who witness a deer exhibiting signs of EHD, especially near a creek or pond, can assist agency efforts to monitor the extent of the disease by reporting it to IDNR Deer Project Manager Tom Micetich at (309) 543-3316, extension 231.