Eating rabbit in warm weather

Discussion in 'Small Game Hunting' started by Texas_Redneck, Jan 11, 2008.

  1. Texas_Redneck

    Texas_Redneck New Member

    Messages:
    1
    State:
    Texas
    I have a question for you guys. I have heard that you should not eat a rabbit that was shot during warm weather. Is that true? How warm? I haven't hunted rabbit in many years, and we had cooler climate when I did it last. I live in East Texas, and it is pretty warm here 9-10 months out of the year. I have heard not shoot a rabbit to eat until the first snow of the year, but where I live, we are lucky to see snow once every 3-4 years.

    Should I just give up on local rabbit hunting? What are your opinions?

    Thanks,
    Mike
     
  2. JERMSQUIRM

    JERMSQUIRM New Member

    Messages:
    13,145
    State:
    il-waynesv
    i think you should contact mythbusters,lol. ive ate them in warm weather. im not sure but i dont buy it. i butcher domestics in warm weather and eat them too. maybe someone on here knows but i am not sure. but ive heard it, myth??? i dont know.
     

  3. psychomekanik

    psychomekanik New Member

    Messages:
    2,534
    State:
    Illinois
    I think thats more of a deterrent for people not to eat them during breeding season...
     
  4. chadf

    chadf New Member

    Messages:
    99
    State:
    Bossier, La
    During the warmer months many rabbits/squirrells have a parasite that burrows under the skin and causes a big sore. It looks pretty disguisting so most folks went by a rule of thumb to not hunt rabbit/squirrel until after the first frost. By this time the parasite has completed its lifecycle and has left its host.

    Go ahead and hunt em up. If you come across one with the parasite you'll see what I'm talking about. Just cut out the bad part and fry the rest.
     
  5. 223reload

    223reload New Member

    Messages:
    10,798
    State:
    Oklahoma
    The first frost theroy also seems to eliminate the numbers of fleas on them ,which by the way carry Beubonic plague.
     
  6. Ol Man

    Ol Man New Member

    Messages:
    3,170
    State:
    Illinois
    Can you say "Warbles"
    __________
    You can outdistance that which is running after you but not what is running inside you. (Rwandan Proverb)
     
  7. olefin

    olefin New Member

    Messages:
    3,908
    State:
    Texas
    Give up eating them if you move to west TX, them Jacks are too tough. :smile2:
    We use to feed em whole to the hogs. Chickens would also eat Jacks but they had to be skinned.

    And Texas Redneck.... WELCOME to BOC!
     
  8. darkthirty

    darkthirty New Member

    Messages:
    14
    State:
    New Mexico
    My mother's side of the family thought you supposed to eat cottentails in the month that have R in them september through march.My dad's side said after the first snow. I say don't over cook them in the micro-wave .Those parasite get on cattle also.
     
  9. south_va_fisherman

    south_va_fisherman New Member

    Messages:
    534
    State:
    Muddy Cross, Virginia
    cold weather kills all the bugs on em. thats my understanding
     
  10. plainsman

    plainsman New Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    7,187
    State:
    minnesota
    What I've been told is any that may be sick with tularemia will die when it gets cold. Fleas will be on them even when its below zero.
     
  11. postbeetle

    postbeetle New Member

    Messages:
    6,598
    State:
    Iowa
    You can kill 'em and eat 'em anytime, esp. if you are hungry and McDonald's is closed.

    The diseases they have in the summer they can have in the winter. There are a lot of them. Many of the diseases they have, and there are many, are transmitted by other vectors also. Not just a rabbit. You can get rabbit fever from a deer fly flying around your face when you pick a rabbit up that is perfectly healthy that you just kilt.

    The killing them in the winter comes long before we had refrigerators and computers. When people actually were people. Just makes sense to kill, dress and process something when it is cold and there are not flies around. Why share your food with maggots.

    Anytime you kill something, your are responsible for what you eat from it. If it ain't healthy looking you will know from observation whether it is worth eating or not. If it looks sick, it is. Then you might be to.

    Virgil: Months with R's in them was when we dug horseradish. Never heard about the rabbit thing before. Any month with an R in it is also not a good time to vote.
     
  12. trnsmsn

    trnsmsn New Member

    Messages:
    1,214
    State:
    Missouri Originally Now I
    It's a myth !!!, we kill'em & eat'em all year round here in FL. As others have said there are diseases & parasites that are year around.

    If it doesn't look sickly, EAT IT :cool2:
     
  13. catfish slick

    catfish slick New Member

    Messages:
    478
    State:
    California
    Hear in California they get Worvles " hope that is how you spell it " in their neck in the summer, that is a kind of a worm, I know that people say that is why they don't eat them in Calif. But I know some Greeks that have their own Restaurant in Las angles, that would beg to differ with that. They even eat the jack rabbits. That is a little to tough for me.
     
  14. olefin

    olefin New Member

    Messages:
    3,908
    State:
    Texas
    Here's a west Texas Jack if you haven't seen one.

    It's 10 ft tall. :cool2:
     

    Attached Files:

  15. Cheryl

    Cheryl Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,010
    State:
    TN

    Jeb,
    Thanks for that link. That's something I never researched on the net. Over the years, some of Mom's cats would get those disgusting warbles, and one of us would hold the cat, and the other would pour turpentine into the hole of the warble. Cat hated it, but it killed the dang warble and the cat lived.

    What I found interesting was in the last sentence of the article you posted.........UGH, I'd hate to think of biting into a warble.

    Mike,
    Welcome to the BOC/SOC.
    Enjoy the site.
    Cheryl
     
  16. JERMSQUIRM

    JERMSQUIRM New Member

    Messages:
    13,145
    State:
    il-waynesv
    Significance


    There is little doubt that the warble can have a debilitating and possibly fatal effect on some animals, particularly young ones. It has been suggested that warbles may actually depress cottontail populations during years when the incidence of parasitism is high and infections are heavy. This parasite is of no public health significance and properly cooked meat from infected animals is safe to eat.


    last papagraph of warbles. seems like we busted a myth.
     
  17. massa_jorge

    massa_jorge New Member

    Messages:
    2,137
    State:
    TEXAS
    quote: "This parasite is of no public health significance and properly cooked meat from infected animals is safe to eat."

    i have eaten rabbits at all times of the year, and never started hunting cottontails 'only in the winter' until i heard the deal about only eating them in the months with an 'r'. i have seen quite a few of those warbles, and eaten rabbits that had them. we just trimmed the meat away from where the thing was. the effected area is quite shallow. most the ones i ever saw were actually along the spine, right above and in front of the pelvis. i don't shoot them after late spring because of the reproduction issues, saving some for seed. if i see too many cottontails during the summer while shooting prairie dogs, i will always thin em out. and any jack i see any time of the year is a dead jack.
     
  18. JERMSQUIRM

    JERMSQUIRM New Member

    Messages:
    13,145
    State:
    il-waynesv
    ive never seen the warbles. ive seen some growths like tumers on thier ribs or a knot or something but never those.
     
  19. brinley45cal

    brinley45cal Active Member

    Messages:
    2,606
    State:
    kentucky
    Ill eatem in any kind of weather.So good it will make ya want to smack yo momma:wink:
     
  20. wayne1967

    wayne1967 New Member

    Messages:
    528
    State:
    Missouri
    Yeah they get them here also in the summer. Really sick when you are cleaning one and you see those maggot looking things. If you cook it long enough it will kill just about anything in it but I won't eat them during warm weather.