Eating Hogs?

Discussion in 'Hog Hunting' started by TX Fisherman, Dec 7, 2006.

  1. TX Fisherman

    TX Fisherman New Member

    Messages:
    607
    State:
    Texas
    okay i wanna know, do yall eat the large pigs yall shoot, because i know some people who wont eat the large hogs what do yall do?
     
  2. bigcatmaniac

    bigcatmaniac New Member

    Messages:
    459
    State:
    California Miss
    i believe that a wild hog is just the same as a farm raised hog. I was raised to the saying "you eat what you kill", i will eat almost everything that i kill except coyote.
     

  3. DryHole

    DryHole New Member

    Messages:
    56
    State:
    Katy Texas
    Most large size pigs will just be tough and will have a game'ness about them.
    We set a trap last Winter and ended up wity 13 pigs..LOL Big Ol Mama and 12 pigglets.
    The lil ones were just under 10 pounds each and Mom was stuck in a hole..[​IMG]

    The Pigglets were soaked in a brine of Brown Sugar and Honey and smoked with some Pear wood ..
     
  4. Katmandeux

    Katmandeux New Member

    Messages:
    1,618
    State:
    Checotah, Oklahoma
    I don't eat feral hogs; they are loaded with parasites and diseases, some of which can kill you. There's a way around this...you gotta cook 'em well, but that raises another issue.

    Feral hogs have almost no fat. Fat is what makes meat moist and tasty. Take a piece of very lean meat, cook it to death...I just don't care for it.:sad2: Most game, to be palatable, needs to be on the rare side.

    Btw, the info on parasites came from my vet. His words: "I don't eat the things, myself, but if you insist on it, cook it well done".

    I have no qualms about shooting feral hogs and not eating them...no more than I would if I was shooting rats at a dump.
     
  5. TX Fisherman

    TX Fisherman New Member

    Messages:
    607
    State:
    Texas
    thanks i agree Katmandeux for the eat what you kill. i was just wondering cause i know people wont eat them because there loaded with parasites. thanks
     
  6. savage308

    savage308 New Member

    Messages:
    399
    State:
    Victoria, Texas
    The family and I eat hog meat all year round. Their thick as molasses here in south texas. As far as parasites I recommend wearing rubber gloves or surgical gloves while cleaning a hog. But to answer your post I enjoy the big ones as much as the lil ones. Biggest one i've personnally shot and ate was over 300lbs and his front shoulders and head were still on the ground. (the scale pegged out at 300lbs)

    As far as the strong taste of the meat. Take a 150qt ice chest and put all the meat in. Fill the ice chest with ice to the top and fill it with water. Then pour 1 gallon of vinegar in and close the lid for 24hrs. After that drain the water and the blood that the vinegar pulled out of the meat. Top off with ice and refill the cooler with just water for another 24 hrs. Then drain the water off and top off with ice for 2-4 days and keep the cooler drained of water. The vinegar will pull the blood out of the meat. (no you won't taste any vinegar when eating the meat) I do this with all my big game animals including Deer, Elk, Hog, Nilgai, Axis, Audad etc...

    As far as boars being tougher meat or big hogs being tougher to eat. Place what ever meat your going to cook into the oven in a roaster pan, uncovered at 350 degrees for 1-1/2 hrs. Then season the meat and put on the pit or however you were going to fix it. I can guarantee you that if someone didn't know it was a big hog they'd think it was as tender as a lil one.

    Hope this helps.
     
  7. jsharris

    jsharris New Member

    Messages:
    132
    State:
    Texas
    We have killed and eaten ferrell hogs all my lifeand look how great I turned out! :dribble: We do a similar thing like savage only we dont put vinigar in it. I will have to try that though. One year we ended up shooting a 350 lb sow not realizing she had little ones. After we shot her the little ones ran out and we caught then with our coats. they were only about 5 pounds each. we ended bringing them home and raising them. only 5 out of the 9 survived but the rest grew to be about 200 lb's. i can still remember the smell of lime and moth balls thrown out around the pin to cut the smell. we also had a great watermelon, tomato, and squash ptch were we sprayed the poop off. just grew on its own. i am sure you could eat it but i refused to!!!
     
  8. Bobpaul

    Bobpaul New Member

    Messages:
    3,039
    State:
    Supply NC
    I've caught and killed hogs in Fl and ate every one of them.

    Some would look pure wild, all grey or black,we called them 'Piney wiood rooters", and some of the same litter would look just like domestic hogs, red coat , or black with white shoulders and one of the pack had an almost orange color with big black dots on it. These were all from the same litter, mamma hog was black.

    The ones I got were trapped then shot. I cleaned and butchered them all. One thing I noticed about them was the pink colored meat and pure white fat. Just like from the grocers, only they ate natural, roots, nuts and elements from the soil.
     
  9. Paraguayguy

    Paraguayguy New Member

    Messages:
    1,650
    State:
    Virginia
    One of the ranches that I duck hunt on in Paraguay has been ranched since 1585 by the same family. There is a large group of feral hogs that have been around forever according to the owner. He thinks they are remnants of escaped domestic pigs from way back in colonial days. They are black and skinny in the rear end and only get up to 200 pounds of so. They are also darn good to eat. I always have a buckshot or two on me while hunting down there. One never knows what kind of larger eatable varmit might show up and want to be invited for dinner. The pigs we eat down there always go on the grill and about a 50 pounder is what everyone wants. Please pass me some more "Morcilla". Blood sausage made from pig blood. Man is it good. I eat two everyday in Paraguay. I never see it in the supermarkets in Virginia.