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when I was a kid, I used to accidentally catch(Israeli?) carp when fishing for buffalo, I gave them to older fellar who said he fried them. And I know a few people who used to pressure cook and can them.
how do y'all cook them?

thanks
 

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sounds like me trying to recreate the family potato soup
yep, failure.
:cry:
 
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I have eaten carp many ways, canned them in a pressure cooker and you can not tell them from canned salmon. Put em on a cracker with a cold beer or make salmon patties cept they are carp. I still brine them and put them in my Traeger smoker and its top quality smoked fish and then of course deep fat frying them, you filet em and then score them real good , when breading spread the scores so it gets into the cuts and then it goes into very hot peanut oil and I mean smokin hot and when they float up they are done and 98% of them bones are gone. Carp were brought over here from Europe cuz that's their favorite fish!!! WE eat turkey on a celebration day they eat baked carp BACK IN THE DAY!!
 

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Assuming the carp was caught in clean water.......fillet the fish. Cut out the red meat. Grind the white meat through a meat grinder. Makes good fish patties or loose ground fish for fish tacos. Use the red meat as bait to catch channel catfish. Or, cut the fillet into chunks the size of dominoes, and pressure can. Tastes like tuna to me, and the little bones just seem to disappear. I never throw back a carp that's less than 24 inches long.
 

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In Omaha there was a place called Joe Tess Restraunt. Carp was delacasi. Some of the best I ever had. They had some big ones in the holding tank. But then that was over 50 years ago.
 

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I remember that place Bill!! I've had lunch there twice during my time in Nebraska, that fish tank and all the carp swimmin around, there was a lunch place in Brownville Nebr., in the park along the Missouri River and get a carp sammich, fries and a drink for 2.50. I have eaten a ton of carp, not bad fish but a little harder to dress than a blue or a crappie and that's its downfall.
 

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Carp have been given a bad name. Comes down to how they've been handled and prepared. You can put them in a tub of fresh water for a couple of days to get rid of the "wild" taste but they are good eating. They are a boney fish (small "y" bones in the meat) but if pressure cooked and made into patties they disintegrate. Even if you just catch, clean and cook them they are good. We have just become accustomed to buying what we eat.
 

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Carp have been given a bad name. Comes down to how they've been handled and prepared. You can put them in a tub of fresh water for a couple of days to get rid of the "wild" taste but they are good eating. They are a boney fish (small "y" bones in the meat) but if pressure cooked and made into patties they disintegrate. Even if you just catch, clean and cook them they are good. We have just become accustomed to buying what we eat.
I think part of it is also the idea that most people in the US process the fish by fillet them to produce boneless piece of meat. Comparing with other culture, and including other fish, they cook their fish with the bones included and pick them as you eat them. It is really not that big deal to eat this way, but one do need to get used to it. It is like eating with fork vs chopstick vs eating with your bare hands - maybe not an apple vs apple comparison, but I think you get the idea.

And yes, I have eaten plenty of carp. Carp is major food source around the world (not just in Asia).
 

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Scored and fried, never heard anyone complain about the taste of cool water Carp but they are a boney fish and without proper scoring it seems one does more picking than eating.
 

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I think part of it is also the idea that most people in the US process the fish by fillet them to produce boneless piece of meat. Comparing with other culture, and including other fish, they cook their fish with the bones included and pick them as you eat them. It is really not that big deal to eat this way, but one do need to get used to it. It is like eating with fork vs chopstick vs eating with your bare hands - maybe not an apple vs apple comparison, but I think you get the idea.

And yes, I have eaten plenty of carp. Carp is major food source around the world (not just in Asia).
Very True. The last time I remember picking through the bones was when I was a kid. We scaled, gutted, cleaned and cooked them. When I learned how to fillet it was very foreign. Now that's all we do. I lived in Italy for 5 years and visited most of Europe. Yep, they enjoy carp in a lot of countries. Watching the different ways it's prepared is a real treat. My dad would just pressure cook them, add spices and herbs then fry them up as fish patties. Yum!
 

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Scored and fried, never heard anyone complain about the taste of cool water Carp but they are a boney fish and without proper scoring it seems one does more picking than eating.
You know, my grandmother in New Mexico would cook them that way. Carp was always available to us. I think they put up one of the best fights. It's always fun catching them. My Uncle would grill them. Makes me miss those good old days. My grandmother was a true fishing fanatic. Always at the river, creek or lake. Grandpa? He would rather watch wrestling lol.
 

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When campin as a kid , we caught 2 to 3 lb carp gutted them put a large amount of butter inside the gut cavity coated them with garlic salt then covered them with a couple of inches of clay mud and stuffed them under the campfire coals. Bout 45 min. later dug them out . When you break off the clay it pulls most of the scales and skin off the fish , also the meltin butter helps soften most of the bones. Along with some whole potatoes makes a great meal.
Yes , you get some grit from the clay but we were kids , campin , and havin the time of our lives .
50 years ago and I can still remember every other kids face as we sat around those campfires .
 

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Asian carp is a completely different animal. They would be the most popular fish in the US if it weren't for the bones IMHO. Super clean and flaky white meat. Just amazing table fare...

Common carp, on the other hand is a bit gamey. I love it, but I love it like I love rabbits. They don't have a processed and pasteurized plain poultry type o' flavor. They taste like fish. They can be gamey. But, they make a great curry and my wife is Asian and curry is a dish she has mastered! Few things I like more than some fresh fish curry made from common carp from cold water...

Peace,
Chad
 

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I fully expect one day in the not so distant future, we will all be eating whatever we can catch.

I like panfish. They are plentiful, sustainable and yummy in my tummy. Nothing like a batch of deep fried panfish....skin, fins and all go in the hot oil (no scales)...pull them out and strip them down...even littleones can be done this way. The meat just falls off the bone so you get a little fried head and skeleton with fins remaining

If I was hungry, I'd eat a carp though.

I wish the asian invaders would bite more readily on hookbait. Luke from Cats and carp had a video and apparently they will bite on some weird things. They are not here yet so I don't know for sure
 
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