Eagle Claw Catfish Rig

Discussion in 'Terminal Tackle Review' started by festus, Jan 12, 2010.

  1. festus

    festus New Member

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    7,660
    Does anyone ever use the Eagle Claw catfish rig? It's a nylon coated (steel?) leader with swivels and snaps. I see lots of these empty packages littering various bank fishing spots so they must be popular. I've never used them. I figured the swivels I use on either a Carolina rig or a 3-way swivel rig with a strong shock leader is sufficient. What do you think?
     
  2. JEFFRODAMIS

    JEFFRODAMIS New Member

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    looks like a crappie rig...crappie have sharp teeth
     

  3. festus

    festus New Member

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    Yeah, them crappie sure do have a tough mouth, too. :cowboy:
     
  4. steveturner024

    steveturner024 Active Member

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    825
    State:
    Illinois
    Name:
    Steve Turner
    I Have used some like that and they are okay for smaller fish. Last spring I was using them and hooked a fish and the snap bent open and the fish swam off with my hook. I don't recommend them. I haven't used one ever since. I now snell my own leaders with 50# Big Game.
     
  5. festus

    festus New Member

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    Those rigs are about $1.50 each. It could get expensive at most of the spots I fish because they'res so many boulders and trees. However, they would be handy for night fishermen. It would be much easier to tie on one of these rigs then snap your hook on instead of tying it. I usually tie up quite a few leaders, 3 way rigs with swivels ahead of time and store them in baggies.
     
  6. festus

    festus New Member

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    7,660
    Yeah, I know what you mean. I like swivels, but not snaps. Every now and then if I'm using Roostertails or spoons for white bass, smallmouth, crappie, or trout I'll use a snap swivel. They're OK for smaller fish, as you said.

     
  7. JEFFRODAMIS

    JEFFRODAMIS New Member

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    guy at academy said the snaps cant be broken by a fish..psssh...i lost a whole packs worth of fish big enough to bend them or snap them
     
  8. Swampfox.

    Swampfox. New Member

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    1,182
    State:
    Louisiana
    anytime i buy store bought leaders, and iv'e bought these, you should re-crimp them. the snaps open, and the crimp slips loose. prolly why you see the empty packs on the ground, some yohoo aint figured that out yet. i make my own leaders now.
     
  9. festus

    festus New Member

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    I don't even like the idea of using a snap with live bait no matter the condition. Maybe it's just me, but it seems it would appear unnatural to a fish. It wouldn't even matter to me if the snap was 800 lb. test, it just don't seem natural. BUT, every now and then if I'm fishing for smaller fish, I'll slip on a bullet sinker, then tie on a snap swivel. Then I'll clip a snelled hook onto the snap. It may not be the strongest rig in the world, but it's sufficient for sauger and panfish. That way if I want to change hook sizes, I just snap on another size snelled hook to avoid retying.
     
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2010
  10. Swampfox.

    Swampfox. New Member

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    1,182
    State:
    Louisiana
    i know what you mean. i dont even use snaps in my leaders, only barrel swivles.
     
  11. USCA-RECLAIMED-ACCOUNT

    USCA-RECLAIMED-ACCOUNT New Member

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    I never got the purpose of em either.Seems cheaper and easier to tie up your own rigs and then you know what you got.You always see them in the tackle shops though,they must be popular somewhere.LOL
     
  12. Papa64

    Papa64 New Member

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    114
    State:
    Illinois
    I like to snell my own hooks, then on the other end I make a loop where all I have to do is feed the loop through the swivel then pull the hook through the loop, poof it's tied on and easy to change. Make sure you put a good knot to hold the loop because just one tie of the loop will slip out under enough pressure.