Duel fuel ?

Discussion in 'Camping Talk' started by bootshowl, Apr 2, 2009.

  1. bootshowl

    bootshowl New Member

    Messages:
    2,288
    State:
    Indiana, J
    Caught myself wondering if now that gas doesn't have lead in it...is there really that much difference? Word up in days past was that the coleman fuel was just white gas, in that it didn't have lead, and the lead would screw up yer generator. Then they took off with "duel fuel" units, lanterns, stoves etc....just wondered if it wasn't kind of a moot point that we hadn't figured out; and the only difference was the label on the appliance. Caught myself wondering if using some premium gas in the older lantern and sportsman stove, might be just fine.
    Anyone tried or know?
     
  2. jolie

    jolie New Member

    Messages:
    828
    State:
    PA
    from a chemist who works at a gasoline refinery. be careful.

    so far as the lead goes- its nearly irrelevant. Lead never had much effect on Vapor pressure (light end hydrocarbons). What you need to figure out is exactly how light is no-lead coleman fuel. Are you sure that in fact, It is Gasoline? did you know that gasoline is lighter in the winter and denser in the summer? my guess is that Colemen fuel is NOT. Even if coleman fuel is Gasoline if you get some with too much butane in the mix- thats dangerous.

    What if coleman fuel might be a 'white gas' but with alot less vapor than automobile gasoline. This could get dangerous. worse case scenario, your stove is designed for something like a Light KEROSENE (not the kind you buy, but some narrow cut around 200-300°); you fill it with gasoline. it isn't designed for all those fumes- flame track back into the tank. Explosion??

    don't know but its not out of the question.

    maybe I'm just embarassing myself since I have no idea what colemen fuel is , but working here I do know to be very cautious around gasoline. :wink:
     

  3. GaryF

    GaryF New Member

    Messages:
    3,649
    State:
    O.P., KS
    My understanding is that the main problem you will have is with the additives in the unleaded gasoline leaving deposits and eventually gunking up and clogging the burner jets. Even with dual fuel stoves I'd stick to using Coleman Fuel, White Gas, or Naptha... which are all basically the same things, and save unleaded gasoline for emergency use.
     
  4. stumpjumper

    stumpjumper New Member

    Messages:
    1,492
    State:
    Dallas, GA
    I agree with Gary. Only use the Coleman Fuel! The option of being able to use other fuels is only intended for short term usage and only in emergencies or other countries.
     
  5. bootshowl

    bootshowl New Member

    Messages:
    2,288
    State:
    Indiana, J
    Tis the "other fuels", I'm interested in. Looking at the future or rather the uncertain future....the other country part may be here sooner than we think.
    Be nice to know what's do-able before ya end up to that, "Hey ya'll watch this." part.
    :smile2:
     
  6. jolie

    jolie New Member

    Messages:
    828
    State:
    PA
    Well in the meanwhile I had a chance to look up coleman fuel. Gary's post is spot on. Coleman fuel is Naptha, and I do know what that is. Coleman says itself in the own FAQ section that coleman fuel has 'similar burning properties' to gasoline.

    I must maintain that although I know longer think you could blow something up. Since I don't know the design(s) of all possible Pre-duel fuel appliance;

    It is risky to say, that You could put gasoline in something Not desinged for gasoline... SO I'm NOT saying you can.

    but I don't think it will 'blow up' rather I think The additives ARE a big deal. Its possible you could foul up your whatever (generator, latern, stove) and you might not be able remove built up 'gums'

    In fact, we have a test called a gums test where we heat gasoline over steam in a glass beaker; by the time the gas has evaporated the beaker usually has a conspicuos stain (it almost looks like a clear coat varnish). Well then take the beaker and rinse it off with hexane, and voila- almost all the gums dissolves and the glass is left clean again.

    if you must put gasoline in PRE-duel fuel coleman fuel appliances; you might expect a gums to build up on nozzles and the like. but you might also be able to take it apart rinse / wash / soak it with a light hydrocarbon and 'clean it off'. I only said MIGHT. you might not be able to get to the right part or your appliance might Oxidize the gum after creating it(that would be bad:crazy:). its not a decision to make lightly.


    Also BTW; I see no reason to use premium gasoline. Actually sometimes, premium gasoline contains More of the additives that you'd be having problems with.

    Old gasoline would create more stubborn gums and of course adding Anything to the gasoline is a bad idea.
     
  7. ateamfisherman

    ateamfisherman New Member

    Messages:
    297
    State:
    Texas
    I beleve that you need to stay with the fuel tshat is intended tor the lantern. Those fuels have different vaper pressures and it would be verry dangerous to bemessing withsomething you dont know what can happen. you dont want tobe burned and be in a hospital burnded all over it is not worth the chance it would work. I DONT THINK YOU NEED TO MESS WITH ANYTHING YOU HAVE NO IDEA WHAT COULD HAPPEN YOU COULD LEAVE A WIFE AND SOME ORPHANE CHILDREN. tHANKS sAM dAVIS
     
  8. oh no

    oh no New Member

    Messages:
    11,108
    State:
    Indiana
    Boots, I have duel fuel lanterns,,, when using unleaded in them I will go threw 10 times the number of mantles,,, and as soon as a mantle gets a hole in it,,, the glass will crack.

    Now unleaded is cheaper than Coleman fuel,,, but there are lots of hidden costs,,,, lol,,, I just use lantern fuel now--- Coleman or that oddball brand Walmart sells.
     
  9. jolie

    jolie New Member

    Messages:
    828
    State:
    PA
    I never advised it:wink:.. and for the record

    Gasoline DOES have more vapor pressure than coleman fuel. Coleman fuel is lower than even summer gas (5.5 colemen vs 9.0 summer gas)

    With winter gas its a lot worse ; winter gas (up here at least) is spiked with butane (you know the stuff for cigarette lighters) and goes up to 14.5.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    But note, he said "emergency use".. Just lacking enough coleman fuel to cook the hotdogs (neccesitatin' an 'emergency run to walmart') Isn't an emergency.

    but stuck somewhere without drinkable water; with a stove, gasoline, a pot and some not drinkable water?
    how safe would it be to use that SUMMER gas, to boil the water to ensure its safe for drinking?
    incredibly unlikely scenario,:tounge_out: I know, but its MY GUESS that the difference between 5.5 and 8.0 isn't going to catch anyone on fire.

    now the kicker! wouldn't it just be safer to just start a little wood campfire??:smile2: Definitely.
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    All I'm giving is just background information. and what is said is Hopefully more likely to Discourage somebody from experimenting

    (espacially if they thought the 'duel fuel' thing was just a change in stickers:wink::wink:)
     
  10. thunderchicken

    thunderchicken New Member

    Messages:
    769
    State:
    Yuma Az
    I agree with Gary. i have several duel fuel Coleman lanterns and stoves and the ones I have used unleaded in seem to gum up and have more problems. i have one lantern now that is scary. I put a new generator in it and can't seem to stop leaks. Damn thing almost blew up once. Never had a problem using Coleman fuel however. I wouldn't look at prices to determine what fuel I use regardless because you don't use them that often to make a big difference. The safety factor outweighs a little more coin in your pocket. Least it does to me.
    :cool2:
     
  11. daystarchis

    daystarchis New Member

    Messages:
    11,521
    State:
    Clovis Cali
    I have a new duel fuel and used gas in it. Gummed it up bad. I guess I need to change the generator:confused2: