Drum?

Discussion in 'ALL OTHER FISH' started by Larry Collier, Oct 1, 2006.

  1. Larry Collier

    Larry Collier New Member

    Messages:
    149
    State:
    Wagoner, Oklahoma
    When I was a kid the only reason we liked to catch drum was to get the rocks outta their head. If you never done that they are two milk white stones located in the skull between the eyes which the drum grands together to make that drumming or croaking sound.

    Anyway - I never ate a drum until an old timer saw me hang a big drum and throw it back. Later that evening at camp he commented that I had thrown away some really sweet eating! The next day I cought another and gave it a try.

    First of all the drum is very boney and many are very small pin bones. Under the old timers direction I took a backstrap fillet from either side fo the dorsal and threw the rest away. The backstrap was cut into bitesize pieces and prepared as you would any other fish. The key here is that the sweet tasting bites of fish should be eaten before they cool completely. Once cool they are a little rubbery in my opinion.

    If it stretches my strang I'm gonna try eatin it - at least once!

    Best to Ya

    Larry
     
  2. SeedTick

    SeedTick New Member

    Messages:
    1,414
    State:
    Conway Arkansas
    Hey Larry, welcome to the Brotherhood. We are glad to have you in the family.

    When I was a kid Daddy would always give me the 'rocks' out of their head too. We have eaten drum as long as I can remember but only the smaller ones, up to 2-3 pounds or so. The bigger ones are like you say have a rubbery texture but the little ones have white meat with big flakes like a good size large mouth bass. The pieces with all the bones are good to but you got to be careful.

    st
     

  3. kyredneck

    kyredneck New Member

    Messages:
    1,021
    State:
    Kentucky
    It's been several years since I've caught/eaten a drum. I remember the smaller ones <5# were really good eating. The meat on the bigger ones is coarse and fishy tasting. BUT, I don't remember them as being boney at all, unless you all are referring to the rib cage. It sounds like you're describing some sort of sucker with the fine bones.

    Around here a lot of people call them white perch. Up on lake Erie they call them sheep head.
     
  4. Larry Collier

    Larry Collier New Member

    Messages:
    149
    State:
    Wagoner, Oklahoma
    Hiya Larry -- were talking about two different fish here. I've never seen a sheephead but drum are well known for their very small bones so it must be a different fish.

    I don't have a pattern for them cause I've cought them along rocky banks casting small plugs, root covered banks on jigs and still fishing flats with a ball of worms. Everytime I hooked one it was by accident.

    Best to Ya

    Larry Collier
     
  5. C_wernett

    C_wernett New Member

    Messages:
    693
    State:
    North Carolina
    Freshwater drum, sheephead and white perch(not the real one) are all names in different localities for the same fish. I used to have a real collection of stones that I pulled from thier heads that I showed off to my friends.

    Now as far as eating them, I tried that twice and don't quite know if I've ever tasted fish as bitter tasting as those guys, and we never tried eating any over about 2lbs.
     
  6. kyredneck

    kyredneck New Member

    Messages:
    1,021
    State:
    Kentucky
    --------------------------------------------------------------------

    Hehe, I got a photo somewhere of my wife hacking the stones from a large one's head after I told her they were there.

    I've been told that they don't hold up to freezing and they should be eaten as fresh as possible. Before I knew better, I froze fillets from a big one probably around 15-17# and couldn't eat it, way too fishy. But from these waters the small ones are good.
     
  7. Larry Collier

    Larry Collier New Member

    Messages:
    149
    State:
    Wagoner, Oklahoma
    I stand corrected - it seems we are talking about the same fish! It appears that we simply have had different experiences. I found this when doing some research ---

    http://animaldiversity.ummz.umich.edu/site/accounts/information/Aplodinotus_grunniens.html

    According to the scientists the "grunt" isn't made by those rocks. It is made by the air bladder. They say the rocks are a part of the inner ear.

    I think the different experiences may be a result of that areas particular habitat. For instance the meat I tasted was actually slightly sweet which could be related to that fishes primary food source or even water quality. The next one I try may be totally different. I dunno - just to understand how the same species of fish can produce different experiences!

    Best to Ya

    Larry Collier
     
  8. SHARON FLEMING

    SHARON FLEMING New Member

    Messages:
    478
    State:
    IOWA
    Hi Larry, in this part of the woods we call them sheephead and drum perch. they are very good eating if you filet them out.
    The largest one I ever caught was 10.o3 lbs. It was on a small lake in western Iowa and I didn't know it at the time but it would have been the lakes record but I wasn't smart enough to turn it in . It took a good 10 min to land, I was only fishing with a 8lb test line and a cheap reel. It was sure fun to catch.

    When I was a kid I was really proud of my stone collection, the other kids would not believe that they came out fish heads
     
  9. kyredneck

    kyredneck New Member

    Messages:
    1,021
    State:
    Kentucky
    I think the different experiences may be a result of that areas particular habitat. For instance the meat I tasted was actually slightly sweet which could be related to that fishes primary food source or even water quality. The next one I try may be totally different. I dunno - just to understand how the same species of fish can produce different experiences!

    Best to Ya

    Larry Collier[/quote]
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Hehe, old Indian proverb:" One man's jerky is another man's turkey".
     
  10. da-cajun-angla

    da-cajun-angla New Member

    Messages:
    221
    State:
    louisiana
    What Are Yall Callin A Drum??? The Only Drum I Know Of Is Saltwater, And They Have Teeth That Look Just Like Human Teeth. Does Any1 Have A Pic Or Know Where To Find One?
    Thanks,
    Shaun
     
  11. Larry Collier

    Larry Collier New Member

    Messages:
    149
    State:
    Wagoner, Oklahoma
    Hiya Shaun -- I think the saltwater version is a cousin to the freshwater drum -- from what I have read there are a half dozen or so fish in the same family including the saltwater redfish or spot. One thing they all seem to have in common is they like eating mussels. I may be wrong on that also - LOL

    Hit the link I posted above for better iinfo and a pic!

    Best to Ya

    Larry
     
  12. C_wernett

    C_wernett New Member

    Messages:
    693
    State:
    North Carolina
    There are various species in the "Drum" family that are fairly closely related. You've got freshwater and saltwater drum species. Speckled and gray trout, spots, croakers, redfish, black drum...it's all the same family.
     
  13. Larry Collier

    Larry Collier New Member

    Messages:
    149
    State:
    Wagoner, Oklahoma
    I talked to an oldtimer on the water yesterday while fishing brushpiles for crappie and told him about this drum discussion. According to him the drums diet is the main contributor to the fishes flavor. The more crayfish, crawdads, mudpuppies or whatever they are called where you live, the sweeter the meat. The muddier the bottom the less desirable the meat. He tells me that the popularity of redfish among the locals along the gulfcoast is because they are excellent table fair.

    I gotta go catch a redfish someday. Until then I think I may try targeting drum on occassion just for fun. A biggun will stretch yer strang!

    Larry
     
  14. Pastor E

    Pastor E New Member

    Messages:
    3,194
    State:
    Beebe AR
    I have caught them in the winter when they are running that had a big spot on there tail down in ms they call them gaspagoo or goo
     
  15. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    In Texas, sheepshead refers to a saltwater fish that has teeth like ridges for breaking up shell fish. Its black and white striped, so in some areas, its called a convict fish. They're good table fare, but not easy to clean. There are red and black drum saltwater fish, the red drum is also know as red fish and in other places, channel bass...good fighter and eater...the bull read run in the fall and after a tropical storm is a good time to be fishing the surf. The black drum is also a good fighter, though not as prized as the redfish. Freshwater drum are related, fight well, and, prepared by a friend, taste great. He says the river drum near his home...a rocky river...taste better than lake drum.
     
  16. jdstraka

    jdstraka Well-Known Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    4,722
    State:
    Council Bluffs, Iowa
    Name:
    John
    Yep Them drum are Good eating in this part of country(Iowa) Had some for lunch today along with a fue Crappie. The trick is to filet them and take the Blood line out and any red on the filet if it has any, then prepair them as normal. never tried to freeze any though always just had them fresh. J.D.