Drifting Setup

Discussion in 'MISSOURI LAKES / RESERVOIRS TALK' started by Propshredder, Nov 12, 2007.

  1. Propshredder

    Propshredder New Member

    Messages:
    112
    State:
    Missouri
    Thought I would ask my Missouri brothers to help me with a question that I had. My boat is set up to fish mainly on the Missouri River with the main rod holder at the back of the boat (4 holders) with 2 at the very front. I do this to anchor and then throw the bait downstream and can fish by myself if needed. However, from what I have read about drift fishing it seems that more people drift with the boat in a sideways drift and sometimes even employ a drift sock on the side of the boat. My question is how would you guys advise me to set up my boat to drift with my current setup so I could drift with my rods out of the back of the boat? Mainly what kind of trolling motor to add to my boat and if a drift sock would be necessary. I'm going to start drifting LOZ, Truman, and Mark Twain and try my luck. I had a great time earlier this summer even though we probably didn't drift exactly right. Also, can you use a drift sock while drifting with the rods out of the back of the boat? Hope this question makes sense, thanks in advance for any help.
     
  2. Fishking

    Fishking Member

    Messages:
    306
    State:
    KC, MO
    Name:
    Andrew
    I just hook the driftsock on the trailer tie down hook on the back of the boat. Worked with no problems.
     

  3. Mr.T

    Mr.T New Member

    Messages:
    2,553
    State:
    MO
    I don't know if "most" guys drift sideways, but I sure don't -- and I don't know anyone who does.

    Drift with the stern of the boat into the wind. Far less rocking, much more stable bait presentation on the bottom.
     
  4. loanwizard

    loanwizard Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,297
    State:
    Coshocton,
    Marty, most of us Ohio guys drift sideways.... in a lake. In a river it's dependent upon conditions, in a big river it is suicidal.

    When drifting sideways it allows us more lines, less chance of tangle.

    If you want to drift nose to the current, a drift bucket or sock off the back cleat does well, if using an electric, just use it to point the nose in the right direction.
     
  5. mudkip

    mudkip New Member

    Messages:
    645
    State:
    SC
    I agree that lake drifting in open water is best by drifting sideways with the wind , you get much better coverage and the speed is just right. When you do have to duck into a creek or if there is no wind we usually use a Minn Kota auto pilot to sneak up and down the creek channels with the bow leading the way. I usually anchor up in river situations esp if there is current present but some real good ones will drift and present baits vertically with a lot of good results. Hope this helps.
     
  6. loanwizard

    loanwizard Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,297
    State:
    Coshocton,
    Just for clarification, I drift sideways when using the wind, backards when there is current to put the nose in.
     
  7. Propshredder

    Propshredder New Member

    Messages:
    112
    State:
    Missouri
    Most of the drifting that I have personally seen and partaken in was done sideways, I'm glad to see that there are some variations. When dropping baits off the back of the boat do you stagger them to avoid tangling lines or just use direction?
     
  8. spoonfish

    spoonfish New Member

    Messages:
    3,780
    State:
    Warsaw, Mo.
    Drifting sideways is ok as long as the winds not very strong. Other wise it raises your rods up and down too much.
    Use a drift sock or a couple of drift buckets. You can make your own buckets and they wont cost you any thing but some rope and a couple of swivels.
     
  9. Mr.T

    Mr.T New Member

    Messages:
    2,553
    State:
    MO
    I routinely fish 5 or 6 rods out of the back of my boat while drifting. With 5 rods, I almost never have any tangles; 6 rods is pushing it but can be done. When I'm by myself, I'll usually cut back to 4 rods, mostly because it gets a little too exciting when you get 3 or 4 fish on at a time. With 2 people in the boat, 5 rods is usually plenty and 6 is certainly the most you can manage reasonably.

    The rods in the center should be the farthest behind the boat, the outside rods closest. Steve Brown uses reels with line counters for precise spacing; I just use the TLAR* method.

    After you reel a line in, you should always cast it to one side or the other and move the other rods toward the center and adjust the amount of line out as necessary. Trying to cast between two lines is just asking for trouble.

    I use a 10 ft diameter drift sock, attached to one of the rear tiedown eyes on the stern of the boat. You want to keep your boat speed around .4 to .7 mph as shown on the GPS, and a big sock does a great job in strong winds.

    I used to drift with the boat sideways, but changed my methods quite a while ago, for several reasons:

    * When you drift sideways, the boat tends to rock excessively with the waves and wake of passing boats. Not only does it wear you out physically from all the motion, it gives your bait a very jerky presentation along the bottom. Does it impact the bite? Probably, but who knows for sure. By drifting with the stern of the boat into the wind, you use the length of the boat to dampen any rocking and have a much more stable bait presentation.

    * I anchor fish in rivers frequently and can use the same rod holders on the same rack in the same position no matter whether I'm drifting or anchored.

    * On days when there's no wind, I drop the Auto-Pilot trolling motor in the water and I'm back in business. You can't do that while drifting sideways, so you're entirely at the mercy of the weather gods. And I can't tell you how many times I've had the wind go calm just as soon as I throw the first line out.

    BTW - any time you mention "drift fishing" on the BOC, always be sure to clarify whether you're drifting in a lake or on a river -- they're totally different things, yet folks use the terms interchangably and always assume that "their" kind of drift fishing is the kind you're talking about.

    *TLAR = That Looks About Right
     
  10. spoonfish

    spoonfish New Member

    Messages:
    3,780
    State:
    Warsaw, Mo.
  11. Kyle

    Kyle New Member

    Messages:
    347
    State:
    Kansas City - Olathe

    thats how I do it as well, works pretty good for the most part.
     
  12. CountryHart

    CountryHart New Member

    Messages:
    10,914
    State:
    missouri
    I like the bucket idea. I'll be makin myself one of the jobbies.
     
  13. Gordhawk

    Gordhawk New Member

    Messages:
    1,378
    State:
    Iowa
    Troy,
    Where do you get those big swivels that you use on those drift buckets?

    Glenn
     
  14. brad kilpatrick

    brad kilpatrick New Member

    Messages:
    2,666
    State:
    Kansas City
    I used some big swivels I got off of trashed throw nets
     
  15. fishingbuddy4

    fishingbuddy4 New Member

    Messages:
    1,564
    State:
    Warner Rob ga
    I drift out of the back of the boat in lakes i use six rods with two people four with just me,I use 8 foot medium action for drifting (i like the lighter tips),I use 1to 3 oz pencil sinkers i pour myself The rig is the sinker on the main line ,then a bead on the main line ,a 3ft leader with a circle hook on the end ,i put a small cigar bobber 4 inches from the hook to keep the bait off the bottom,I have caught hundereds of fish this way ,You will love it if you try it.
     
  16. spoonfish

    spoonfish New Member

    Messages:
    3,780
    State:
    Warsaw, Mo.
    Glenn, I used a double dog chain swivel. The two way type seem to work the best (kind of like a big double barrel swivel). Like Brad said though you can use the bigger ones off old cast nets if you have them but the dog chain ones are much heavier.

    You will probably need 2 of the buckets to hold the boat depending on how big your boat is. I would start out by only putting a few hole saw holes in the buckets to see how much drag you desire from them. You can allways drill another hole or two once you try them.