Drifting School.

Discussion in 'LOCAL OHIO TALK' started by One Legged Josh, Feb 17, 2009.

  1. One Legged Josh

    One Legged Josh New Member

    Messages:
    458
    State:
    Ohio
    S_MAN has told me some of the drifting basics to get me started. I was looking for some more ideas/insight on how to drift lakes. I have a small jon-boat with a gas motor and a 30 pound electric troller. I have stout frame mounted rod holders welded out of 1/2" material, and a bucket drift sock. I'm targeting channels for now but want to hit Salt Fork this year for flats.
    The lakes/resevoirs I will be drifting are pretty shallow all under 20 feet. I know tactics will be a little different for lakes than drifting rivers (prolly wont need the drift sock much).
    I want to cover some water and learn more about the structure with my fish finder. I have circle hooks ready to go, and cut/live bait available. I have drifted Erie for walleye but this is a little different.

    I'm new to drifting whats your tried and true advise?
    Rigs, bait presentation,bait preference,speed, anything you think will help.

    Thanks Again. CPR will be practiced!
     
  2. BassMassey

    BassMassey Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,883
    State:
    Oconee
    ......i've recently started lake drifting also, and it does take some figuring out. I was shown first hand though fishing several different times with a reputable guide down at santee. I use what's called a santee drift rig, and usually fish 4 rods with the baits a good way behind the boat....these rigs hardly hang-up........i've lost one rig so far, and i've been drifting through some pretty good hang-ups. For more info on the santee drift rig look up wyliecat......he has some really good videos that explain them better then i can tell ya. I've actually been drifting w/ just the wind and no trolling motor....a couple drift buckets behind the boat to keep me lined up and slowed down good........but I'm soon getting a trolling motor.......being at the mercy of the wind can be a hassle on some days. The speed of your drift is very important..........most say keep it at 0.5 mph or slower........especially when the water temp. is down........you want to barely be moving. Look on the SC pages, that's how alot of those guys down there do their fishing, and they're good at it................and as far as drifting for flatheads......I don't think it's the way to go........yeah, flatheads are caught drift fishing.....but it's mostly blues & channels.......
     

  3. catfishDK

    catfishDK New Member

    Messages:
    53
    State:
    cincinnati OH
    I mostly drift the OH river but how i go about it is i find a certain stretch wether it be a deep river bend or a stretch with some structure rocks,timber etc. i rig with the same as if i was anchored 4-6 oz no rolls and i position each pole at diff. depths one bouncin bottom one a foot off bottom and on up i use my trolling motor to stay on course and i try to keep my speed just so that my lines go straight down insted of them pulling behind. I use the gps to mark my couse and mark certain points along the course were i got the most action, i will do the same stetch a few times depending on the bite, it can get very annoying getting snagged so much but it definitely produces some fish so keep at it, hope this helps....FISH ON!!
     
  4. ryang

    ryang Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,380
    State:
    Blacklick, Ohio
    Name:
    Gary
    When I went to the Henderson KY gathering a couple of years ago they would go broadside of the current and let the bait go to the bottom then real up about 1ft or so. They were going mainly for blues but I suppose it would work in a lake.
     
  5. One Legged Josh

    One Legged Josh New Member

    Messages:
    458
    State:
    Ohio
    It must have been confusing the way I said it. I wnat to use the info I gather at salt fork lake while drifting for channels to learn the bottom structure for targeting flatties!
     
  6. BassMassey

    BassMassey Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,883
    State:
    Oconee
    ........my fault, but i hear ya..........i've actually been doin the same....moving at such a slow speed you can pick things up on your sonar you might not normally............here's the video i was tellin ya about, I would say this is the best rig hands down for drifting a lake.....check it out

    http://www.catfish1.com/forums/showthread.php?t=99407&highlight=drift
     
  7. cathog

    cathog New Member

    Messages:
    855
    State:
    Lone Oak Texas
    I drift fish in lakes 90% of the time. I use the santee rig and drag it somewhere from 50 to 90 yards behind the boat. I will fish with up to 6 rods, and use my trolling motor to keep everything lined up right. The slinky weights will get hung up some but usually will come out fairly easily. Speed is very important, i like to drift between .4 and .7 miles per hour. I can usually do that in my boat with no drift socks. It is a small bass boat that has almost no wind signature. I have caught a few flats while drifting but mainlly target blues while doing it. The best thing you can do, is get out there and see which way your boat drifts naturally the best. Once you figure that out you are well on your way to successful drifting. If you drift the way your boat drifts the best naturally, it will eliminate many problems that could arise and a whole lot of work. It is much easier to slow down that way and you willl have less line tangles that way. Just use your trolling motor sparingly to keep everything lined up.
     
  8. One Legged Josh

    One Legged Josh New Member

    Messages:
    458
    State:
    Ohio
    I just spent an hour watching you-tube videos of drift fishing stuff. I now have a shopping list and a few "projects" to do. Thanks for the link and all of your tips guys!
     
  9. ohio hilljack

    ohio hilljack New Member

    Messages:
    943
    State:
    ohio
    I've been drifting in lakes here in Ohio for about a year Josh and I probably don't do it like everyone else but I do catch alot of channels. I almost never use the wind as it seldom follows the contours of the lake bottom,I prefer my trolling motor. I usually start by traveling different depths at a slightly faster troll till I start hitting fish consistantly. I mark the depths at which I catch these fish to give me a target area. I slow the boat down and even stop sometimes if I happen to travel over a area where I mark fish, it seems this will sometimes allow fish to catch up to the bait. I know that the fish are quick enough that they can hit the bait while it is moving but try and think of channels as bloodhounds . Sometimes I think they get on the trail and stopping gives them time to catch up to the bait .
    The rigs in the video are excellent and seldom hang up, if I don't have any slinkys made up I fish a small 1 ounce sinker tied on with a lighter line that will break the sinker off if it gets snagged. I use a drift rack on the back of the boat and stagger the lines out the back to keep them from tangling when making turns to follow contours. The rigs are kept fairly far back as the lake water I fish really isn't that deep and I believe the boat passing often scares fish under the boat. Fishing further back will give them time to move back in and check out the disturbed water. Circles are the only way to go when drifting, they have excellent hookup rates and fish hitting poles while you are busy with other fish will hook themselves.
    The one thing I always make sure I carry is a extra trolling motor battery as the constant use will wear them down. Hope this helps.