Drift sock for anchoring?

Discussion in 'Boating' started by smhmc6, Feb 2, 2008.

  1. smhmc6

    smhmc6 Member

    Messages:
    744
    State:
    Kansas
    Alright, someone tell me everything you know about drift socks :smile2:. I'm thinking about changing the way my boat is rigged, when I get around to flooring it among other things, but I also want to put a drift master type rack on the back instead of rod holders along the side. I was thinking about this and how I currently anchor my boat. Usually I put down an anchor in the front and let out a bunch of line then do the same thing in the back then pull the boat to center and tie off. When I got to thinking about it, I wondered if casting out the back with several lines would get tangled on the anchor rope and that brought me to the idea of a drift sock. It wouldn't be out as far and probably wouldn't have a tangling problem.

    So my question is, would it only work if there was current? Can you do this if there is little or no current (like on a lake)? The main idea is to keep the boat from swinging a bunch and picking the sinkers off the bottom and all that. Do you guys use a drift sock for this purpose or is it only for drift fishing?
     
  2. BIG GEORGE

    BIG GEORGE New Member

    Messages:
    10,362
    State:
    JOISY
    I do use a drift sock in the river. It will cut down on the sway of the boat quite a bit.
     

  3. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

    Messages:
    5,444
    State:
    Henderson,Ky
    We use drift buckets here on the Ohio River for that purpose.
    Take 2 5gal buckets take off the handles and drill 5 - 1 1/4 holes in the bottom (1-center, 4 evenly spaced on the outer edge). Then drill 4 - 3/8 holes around the top (evenly spaced).
    Take 2 pieces of 5/16 rope for each bucket about 2 1/2' long and run the ends of each rope into opposing holes (across from each other) and tie a double through half hitch on the ends so they are even when you bring the two ropes together(the knots hold against the bucket) in the center. Now Tie a 10' section of rope to the two ropes in the center of the bucket.
    Now you have a home made drift sock that cost you very little and they work great. I hope this helps.
     
  4. CaptainBrad

    CaptainBrad Active Member

    Messages:
    622
    State:
    North Dakota
    I use drift sockes for holding still in the river all the time. Most of the time I can tie my anchor rope off the center of the boat and let the current do the work but some times when the wind is from the side or opposite of the current the drift sock is the way to go in my opinion.

    I can't comment on a lake but if you use the winds correctly it should work for you. One think I like to do if the drift sock isn't working because of high winds or lack of current is throw the front anchor then back off using the boat motor then throw a second anchor vertically off the back corner of the boat.
     
  5. catfishsafari

    catfishsafari New Member

    Messages:
    171
    State:
    missouri
    5 gallon buckets??. I know you must be kidding. Unless deerhunter is right about you.
     
  6. SkipEye

    SkipEye Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,525
    State:
    Winfield, MO
    Name:
    Darryl

    Well Steve, a bunch of us use 5 gallon buckets....err..... drift buckets. Cheap to make and they work great. Can hold other things also when not in use.:wink:
     
  7. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

    Messages:
    5,444
    State:
    Henderson,Ky
    No....I ain't Kid'n, LOL!!! You don't have to worry about a fish getting into it near as bad as you do with a drift sock either!!! There is something about Fabric mesh and hooks that just don't mix well!!!!!

    PS. DH ain't right in the........well you get the picture, LMAO!!!!
     
  8. biga

    biga Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,112
    State:
    evansville
    steve you need to get down here and fish with some of these rednecks ...... you will leave with all kinds on new habits... some bad some good...
     
  9. lissaannjon

    lissaannjon New Member

    Messages:
    149
    State:
    Dubuque, IA
    steve for the second question that you had about using a drift SOCK (not drift bucket jw) i can say that they dont work worth a crap in slack water. you really need some current to keep that sock doing its job and pulling the back of the boat straight. at least thats what i have found in my areas. the upside to them is that if a fish does get wrapped in one you can normally pull it right in and get them netted.
     
  10. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

    Messages:
    5,444
    State:
    Henderson,Ky
    Sure you can use a drift sock in pristene conditions (were debris is minimal) but here, you would spend more time cleaning it out than fishing. The buckets very seldom ever pick up debris or need cleaning out. this adds up to more fishing time.
    The use of either would not be feasable in the conditions that you are asking about in your post, smhmc6!
     
  11. catfishsafari

    catfishsafari New Member

    Messages:
    171
    State:
    missouri
    I think you guys are right. Plus they make a great porta-potty:sad2:.
     
  12. fishhook

    fishhook New Member

    Messages:
    658
    State:
    Willow Woo
    I think he means the ones without holes, JW.
     
  13. FREESPOOL

    FREESPOOL New Member

    Messages:
    1,234
    State:
    Edwardsville, Illinois
    No, he was refering to the buckets WITH holes. He fishes out of a boat with a self draining front deck. :smile2:
     
  14. catfishsafari

    catfishsafari New Member

    Messages:
    171
    State:
    missouri
    Hey a little chum never hurts :confused2:.
     
  15. loanwizard

    loanwizard Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,297
    State:
    Coshocton,
    In answer to your question, a drift bucket/sock (I use a bucket in the river) doesn't do much good in a lake situation.

    When lake fishing I drop an anchor off the front, back the boat off and set the 1st anchor, then I move foreward and off to the side where I drop another anchor off the front and back off again. Then I complete the triangle with a vertical angle off the rear creating an anchor triangle.

    In the river I will use one anchor off the front and a drift BUCKET, or in heavy current, 2 anchors off the front and a drift bucket for stability.
     
  16. petersoutcats

    petersoutcats New Member

    Messages:
    238
    State:
    Tennessee
    JW do you have to drill holes in the buckets? I made a drift bucket without holes. It was easy enough to bring back into the boat, but the current was not that strong. It did not seam to work good stopping rear swing, but i think it was because of lack of current.
     
  17. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

    Messages:
    5,444
    State:
    Henderson,Ky
    Yes, the holes are neccesary to allow some water to flow through the bucket and keep it in line with the current. Without the holes I would think it would swing wild and not keep you straight.
     
  18. petersoutcats

    petersoutcats New Member

    Messages:
    238
    State:
    Tennessee
    Thanks JW
    I will drill some holes now in my perfectly good bucket:smile2:
     
  19. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

    Messages:
    5,444
    State:
    Henderson,Ky
    Perfectly good buckets are very easy to find but, a good drift bucket is a little harder to come by, LOL!!! We use two of them at a time to keep the boat straight (one on each side). Keep the ropes even and you will stay straight with the current.
     
  20. petersoutcats

    petersoutcats New Member

    Messages:
    238
    State:
    Tennessee
    10-4 I will make up another one