Drift fishing question

Discussion in 'All Catfishing' started by fraid_knot, Feb 10, 2006.

  1. fraid_knot

    fraid_knot Guest

    I keep readin bout some of you all drift fishing. Let me get this straight. Is it kinda like trolling, without a motor? I'm guessing this is sumthin done where there is current. Wouldnt be much drift in a lake (with out a sail).

    I've seen some pics of some folks drifting setups an they would make most spoonbill snaggers jealous.

    Thanks for painting a clearer picture in advance.

    bob
     
  2. Itch2Scratch

    Itch2Scratch New Member

    Messages:
    1,662
    State:
    Ivy Bend on LOZ, Missouri
    Bob when I still had a boat, I use to turn it sideways to the wind and let it carry me. If the winds were to strong I would toss out a couple 5 gal buckets with a zillion holes drilled in them to slow me. Buckets front and rear of course.
     

  3. Sinker

    Sinker New Member

    Messages:
    216
    State:
    Missouri
    Snaggermuns call that 'trollin'.
     
  4. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,175
    State:
    NC
    You are pretty much on. You can do it on a lake easily, and the higher profile the boat the more drift you get. My pontoon drifts easily. Like ITCH said, you can use a drift sock to slow you down. You can also drift with a trolling motor and use it to keep the boat oriented the right way.

    I typically run four lines off the back when drifting, but if I have someone with me I can manage six.

    95% of my fish are caught drifting/trolling.
     
  5. fraid_knot

    fraid_knot Guest

    Thanks you all.
    When I first came to this site an began seein the term "drift fishin", I thought it was akinda riggin. Kinda like juggin where yer line drifts into or over cover. Then I seen some pics of someones boat rigged up for ten poles to be mounted for drift fishin. And thought if they's just driftin around, that would sure make for a long night of untanglin lines. :blink:
     
  6. Sinker

    Sinker New Member

    Messages:
    216
    State:
    Missouri
    So far nobody's said anything about how deep is practical. I know enuff to raise my rigs if I'm hanging up, but here in Truman Lake the bottom can be perty well littered up with snags. Is there a depth at where the presence of the boat seems ta scare off the fish? And does live bait or cut bait work better for you?
     
  7. WylieCat

    WylieCat Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,175
    State:
    NC
    You would be amazed at how easy it is NOT to get tangled. The only time I have a problem with tangling into other lines is when I try making to many turns, and that only happens when I have my lines out at the same distance.

    As far as depth goes Sinker, I am bottom fishing with the drift/trolling rig. It is sinkered to the bottom, but the bait is floated about 12"-18" off the bottom with a cork. Some guys run another rig that will put the bait even higher, like around 24"-36". I may try that this summer.

    I cast out as far as I can, then I let 20-30 yards spool off. This puts the bait a good ways behind the boat.
     
  8. Desperado

    Desperado Active Member

    Messages:
    1,245
    State:
    Pataskala, Ohio
    Name:
    Clarence
    I drift with one 5-gal bucket with 6 - 2" holes drilled in the bottom and tied to the middle of the boat.
     
  9. Desperado

    Desperado Active Member

    Messages:
    1,245
    State:
    Pataskala, Ohio
    Name:
    Clarence
    I drift a bit different. I use the same as far as the boat, but with my rigs I put a walking sinker on the bottom of the line, try to use the lightest weight you can to at least keep it on the bottom, I start out with 1/2/ oz.. The faster your drift the more weight you will need to keep it on the bottom. Also have two dropper loops in the line. One at about 12" off the bottom and one at about 24" off the bottom. I start my drift and let the lines out to the bottom and as I start moving I have the lines at about a 45 degree angle to the water. I have done very well doing this. It seems like at times you only have a short piece of line out, but when you hook up it's great to have them green right at the boat.;)
     
  10. vlparrish

    vlparrish New Member

    Messages:
    1,276
    State:
    Bedford, Kentucky
    Guys, I don't know about using a light weight. I drift fish the Ohio regularly and I use a five ounce bank sinker always. Yea ther are some places the current is too swift or the bottom is too snaggy for me to be productive, but in the ideal hole the heavy weight will kind of let the bait "jig" up and down. I have had as many as eight poles out at one time when by myself without much tangling and I have had four blues on at one time without much tangling and I fish from a 14' semi-v. I see alot of these guys just drifting off of the back of the boat or one side, I have side mounted rodholders all the way from the front to back on both sides and I can run poles on both gunnels.
    Vern
     
  11. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    IMO, "light weight" is a relative thing, depending on things such as depth, speed in relation to the water, and amount of line out. You need to have enough weight to get your bait down to the bottom, but so much that it is always dragging. At one place where I drift, I need 4 or 5 ounces of weight; on the other hand, I've been thinking about experimenting with a few feet of leadcore line for a weight for drifting some other places.
     
  12. Sinker

    Sinker New Member

    Messages:
    216
    State:
    Missouri
    Great stuff. Do ya do as well at nite? And are there different techniques that work better at nite?
     
  13. fraid_knot

    fraid_knot Guest

    Thanks for all the input. So now when I see a boat with rods stickin everywhere (after snaggin season) I wont think its just someone that forgot what day it is. lol
    I mite be inclined to havta try this. Tho it still seems like a good way to get all tangled.
    I too am I nite fisherman. So anything that mite help would be good.

    Thanks again for all yer input.
     
  14. okiecop

    okiecop New Member

    Messages:
    265
    State:
    Grove, OK
    Fraid knot. Drift fishing is a big thing over here on grand lake in oklahoma. Provided you have a boat. I know a lot of the older guys around here that this is the only way they fish for cats. I have seen more than my fiar share of fish brought in this way. now i just need to get a boat.
     
  15. Sinker

    Sinker New Member

    Messages:
    216
    State:
    Missouri
    LOL Never thought about the way I fish showing my age! That mite be a whole new thread!
     
  16. catfishrus

    catfishrus New Member

    Messages:
    1,569
    State:
    north carolina
    i have a question on drift fishing which i do alot of at satee from time to time. great way to catch fish. i drift off the side of a deep v alumi. boat. i use drift socks one at the front and one at the back it keeps the boat pretty striaght and sometimes i trim my main motor up or down to help keep the boat striaght to the winds. now the question is we catch all the fish in the back of the boat why? the only difference i can is the front of the boat may be getting picked up higher than the back from the 2-3ft waves. i use 6-8 poles at a time.
     
  17. bandit06

    bandit06 New Member

    Messages:
    25
    State:
    TEXAS, Lake Fork
    My wife has been after me to take her to Grand Lake to fish, she used to live around there. I would be happy to supply the boat if you want to guide us to some places to fish. I have never been on that lake.
     
  18. Mountain Cur

    Mountain Cur New Member

    Messages:
    171
    State:
    Missouri, Warsaw
    The thing that stood out for me in the majority of the replies was bouncing a weight off the bottom. I fish Truman Lake regularly, "Pomme" Arm and we seldom try to get rigs any deeper than 12 to 16 feet until the weather really warms up and then stagger depths from the surface to the bottom. Oxygen levels "go south" and several other things happen so in effect we are hunting the right depth (depth finder finds fish it doesn't make them bite). Other than the "old River" channel this lake supposedly averages 21 feet in depth, NOT sure but that is what the stats say. Osage at KK Island, south end will show 70 plus feet. Most fish in that area are caught on the humps and flats around the East side of the island. The majority of the fish we have caught in that area are from a foot down to 18 or 20 feet deep. This can take place in the heat of the day or the middle of the night. The "drift by our deck boat can be controlled with the buckets like some said, somtimes we put one bucket out to hold the bow into the wind and put the "bimini" top up like a sail, then we fish off the front deck, sometimes we can get a good side drift with two buckets. Cut or whole shad, sometimes turkey liver is the preferred bait, and some of that "other" stuff will never be put on my boat.:)
     
  19. Lngbo

    Lngbo New Member

    Messages:
    622
    State:
    Marion Ark
    I think it is In Fisherman that has a good article on river fishing doing drifting.
     
  20. spoonfish

    spoonfish New Member

    Messages:
    3,780
    State:
    Warsaw, Mo.
    John, How are you suspending your baits to keep them up off the bottom?