Drift fishing for blue catfish?

Discussion in 'Blue Catfishing' started by playinghooky, Mar 23, 2006.

  1. playinghooky

    playinghooky New Member

    Messages:
    110
    State:
    north carolina
    how well does drift fishing do during the day time in the spring
     
  2. nuthinlikeacat

    nuthinlikeacat New Member

    Messages:
    517
    State:
    Eden Prairie, Minnesota
    I know a lot of people who do very well drift fishing that time of the year during the day.
     

  3. TeamCatHazzard

    TeamCatHazzard New Member

    Messages:
    517
    State:
    Illinois
    It can be just as good during the day as it can at night. Personally I prefer night time fishing, but have seen some of the same results from day and night fishing. When the water temps get right about 50 degrees I think it good around here and the weather is right, gets a little warmer, then it should pick up. I like drifting in mid spring to early-mid summer, but that is just when I have the best luck! Good luck!
     
  4. 1stpalindrone

    1stpalindrone New Member

    Messages:
    84
    State:
    Denton, Texas
    What are some of yall's methods for drifting?

    I recently bought a drift sock and tried drifting for channels/blues for the 1st time. The way the boat sat in the wind with the sock out was kinda off keyster and made it awkward for rod placement. I guess I need to try a new tie off point for the sock or add some rod holders at diff. spots.

    I also tried different riging ways for the baits. What do yall have the best luck with? What kinda hooks for the drift? Set the bait on the bottom and drag it or suspended?.. I used cut shad :confused: with no luck...
     
  5. ShilohRed

    ShilohRed New Member

    Messages:
    4,339
    State:
    West Tn
    Spring time and drifting can't be beat. Or that is the way it is here on the Tn river. When theres current. If no current then its time to anchor fish. Or set the trolling motor to where the boat just moves slow.

    Pete
     
  6. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Where you attach your anchor rope or tie off your drift sock will make a huge difference in the position in which the boat drifts. Same goes for where your trolling motor is attached if you're using it for drift fishing. I've even heard of people attaching their TM to the side of the boat right in the middle, so they could get a sideways drift that allowed several rods to be fished side by side. Also, a sideways drift gives you a wider spread to your baits than a straight "in-line" drift. When anchoring in a current, using an attachment point a little ways back from the bow will cause the boat to sit sort of sideways in the current, allowing more rods to be fished. (The slower the current, the further back from the bow you can attach the rope.)
     
  7. SeedTick

    SeedTick New Member

    Messages:
    1,414
    State:
    Conway Arkansas
  8. TIM HAGAN

    TIM HAGAN New Member

    Messages:
    1,236
    State:
    Walkersvil
    I drift fish all year long and do very well mostly day time and i drift all waters of 3 feet to 50 feet. As for hooks I use kahle or J hooks 3/0 to 10/0 for live or cut bait and treble hooks for DK #2 up to 5/0.
     
  9. loki1982

    loki1982 New Member

    Messages:
    420
    State:
    Texas
    We catch more drifting during the day than at night.

    The way we do it is first go through your proposed fishing spot and see how far the fish are off the bottom. Usually in our local lakes we find then 3-6 foot off the bottoms.

    We use a bit of a wierd rig, ill try and explain it and draw it out.

    --------()--------<>--J

    ok the () is a weight
    the <> is the bobber
    the J is the hook

    You want a distance from the weight to the bobber to the the distance the fish are off the bottom. What happens is your weight drags on the bottom but your bobber floats behind it suspending your bait off the bottom. Learned this rig form a local catfish guide and has worked wonders for us.
     
  10. Jamey

    Jamey New Member

    Messages:
    138
    State:
    Pegram, Tennessee
    I've used this rig a few times during the summer to keep my bait out of the weeds and mud while bankfishing, but I never thought to use it while drifting. Definitely gonna give that a try, thanks!
     
  11. outoftheboat

    outoftheboat Active Member

    Messages:
    426
    State:
    South Carolina
    I fish Santee Cooper every week and that is the rig that i use all the time. For the weight. I have 1/8 oz egg sinkers strung on trotline string so that it looks like a pencil. This rig will not get hung up. But if it does, it will come off a stump, just go on the side it's hung on and almost all of the time it will let go. 99.9% of the time I drift and use this rig.
     
  12. kyblue49

    kyblue49 New Member

    Messages:
    77
    State:
    kentucky
    I fish below a dam where the current makes it hard to anchor. Drifting is a pretty good way to cover alot of water.
     
  13. Cattoo

    Cattoo New Member

    Messages:
    603
    State:
    caneyville,ky.
    i use a variation of that rig almost always when fishing in snag infested water like rocks. instead of running my line through the sinker i put a swivel and a dropper line and then the sinker is attached to the dropper. i use a smaller diameter line for the dropper so if i hang, i can break the sinker off and not lose the whole rig.
     
  14. FishMan

    FishMan New Member

    Messages:
    2,293
    State:
    Tennessee
    when you guys talk about drift fishing do you mean turn your motor off and just fish under your boat as your boat goes downstream with the current. the river I fish is 30 to 50 feet deep. It sounds like something I might try.
     
  15. SeedTick

    SeedTick New Member

    Messages:
    1,414
    State:
    Conway Arkansas
    Fishman, You'll love it. Just free spool to the bottom, reel up some and bounce it off the bottom while you drift. It's a lot of fun and seems to be productive.

    ST
     
  16. loki1982

    loki1982 New Member

    Messages:
    420
    State:
    Texas
    Most people from my experience turn off motor and just drift. There is a certain wind speed that is exactly right and if you get out on the lake in a good spot with this wind speed youll tear em up. I would guess depending on your boat size and how much wind it catches, 5-7 mile an hour consistant wind is about the best. Or in a river current about the same speed. You want to be able to go a couple hundread feet in about 10 minutes.

    The reasoning behind driftfishing and its sucess is a few simple keys reason. 1 your covering more water, you have to chance to find spots where the fish are instead of sitting waiting for a fish to come to you. And 2, catfish are believed to be able to follow a scent trail. So you may attract a cat 50 yards behind you simply becuase you passed by his hole earlier.

    Before we heard of drift fishing my dad and I considered 2-3 pound cats big. And if we cuaght more than 1-2 cats that big in a day we thought we were doing great. One day we went guiding for my birthday and the guy showed us drift fishing. we caught 60 blues/channel mostly blues from 2-7 pounds. This was easter about 2-3 years back. He told us to come back in winter to catch bigger fish. We came bakc in December and he got us on 24 blues/channels that were 5-15 pounds(15 pounds was my biggest cat ever). We got a boat used tactics he told us about, and now we catch cats around 6# almost every trip. The next winter I hooked up on about a 20# blue that broke my line at the boat. Drift fishing has changed my catfishing more than any other style has ever done.
     
  17. striper

    striper New Member

    Messages:
    49
    State:
    north carolina
    another good rig to try is using pencil lead and surgical tubing. It is a rig that I used when i was guiding on the salmon river in new york. I use 1/4" pencil lead and 1/4" tubing. they make pencil lead and tubing in different sizes. the 1/4" lead is thinner in diameter and doesn't hang up. cut surgical tubing in about 1 to 1 1/2 inch pieces and then attach to a snap swivel. Slide whatever size lead that is needed in the tubing. Slide swivel with tubing on your main line, slide a bead on after that and then attach a barrel swivel. then you can use whatever leader configuration that you are comfortable with. If the weight hangs up it will pull free of the tubing and that is all you lose. if the tubing tears the you can put on a new piece. it keeps cost down.
     
  18. Rockin' Blues

    Rockin' Blues New Member

    Messages:
    310
    State:
    st.louis mo.
    I have done real well during the day,last year in May in the middle of the afternoon at Truman lk. my buddy[catmankev]caught a 44lb Blue.And we caught about 20 that day.
     
  19. playinghooky

    playinghooky New Member

    Messages:
    110
    State:
    north carolina

    what is a drift sock
     
  20. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    When I'm drifting the rough water right below a dam or powerhouse, I never cut my outboard off. You never know when you'll need to put it in gear and power out of a dangerous situation. There are even places that will suck you towards the dam, rather than letting you drift downstream.