Don't pout...go scout!!!

Discussion in 'LOCAL OHIO TALK' started by catfishrollo, Sep 9, 2007.

  1. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

    Messages:
    6,894
    State:
    Ohio
    here is how it is boys and girls. lol. this is the probably the best advice i can give to anyone that wants to increase their chance of catching and catching regular. this sport isn't hard to figure out. it takes time, patience, and the ability to adapt to conditions mother nature throws at you. that being said, lots wonder why the same few always seem to be sucessful? i will say some has to do with instinct, placing yourself in position to be in the best area when needed. However, more has to do with the time spent learning your water. you have to see your river, lake etc. often. you need to see it in the different seasons. even winter! you have to learn the water depths. nudges holes and crannys there. small details!! then you start to think like the fish. you try to get an idea on the movements of them and why they are doing what they are. make them half-way predictable! i'm still figuring out this sport myself, and i can tell you nothing is predictable! lol. But, i have found that scouting your water till you know it like your backyard is a must! When you mow, you know if there might be a rut your mower might hit..right? so you avoid it.. you need to know your area your targeting the same....take this small information and go catch yourself a bigun!!! goodluck...rollo
     
  2. x smokin joe

    x smokin joe Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,132
    State:
    Monclova,
    Name:
    Joe
    You got that so right. I have been fishing my stretch of river for over 20 years and you would be amazed how many times I get walleye fisherman (who fish here a few days a year) trying to tell me about the river. More than once I have told people exactly where to go for cats only to be told later they got run out by rangers or it was blocked at sunset so they couldn't get in. The absolute best advice I can give is listen to what the person is telling you and if you are told a state park don't go to a metro park on the wrong side of the river instead.
    Knowing your river or lake means more than geography. Every body of water is different and the fish in them act different. Fot the past 3 weeks while you all in southern Ohio had hot water to contend with we had good water temps and high water. Lots of new trees washed around for me to find and fish.
    Bait is another biggy. I like to catch big flats but i go for channels 8 out of 10 trips. Knowing where to fish does no good if you are using the wrong bait or have it rigged wrong. If you know you are where the fish are and not getting hits try different bait or different presentation. Today they might want liver on the bottom but tomorrow the might want cut bait or live bait on a bobber.
     

  3. Mickey

    Mickey New Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    14,592
    State:
    Illinois
    Jason I totally agree with you. It is a necessity to scout if you want to become consistent. Good advice.:smile2:
     
  4. pelark

    pelark New Member

    Messages:
    55
    State:
    Ohio
    rollo,
    That is one of my favorite things about this site...and this sport...it is so, so simple. We all try to make it so difficult sometimes. We get all caught up in the technology and the equipment that we forget the most important part sometimes. Thanks for reminding us all that if you have a $1000 set up and throw it where the fish aren't...chances of catching them are nil...but a $25 r/r combo thrown on top of a big cat, where he lives, might just get you a big 'un.
    Phil
     
  5. s_man

    s_man New Member

    Messages:
    3,012
    State:
    south east ohio
    Rollo is right on the money. You wouldn't go squirrel hunting in a meadow, or groundhog hunting in the woods, or deer hunting on main street. Cause none of those critters normally inhabit those areas. You go out looking for places where they feed, bed, or travel through to get to one of the other two. Same for catfish, the only way to eliminate unproductive areas is to fish them, durring each season many times. After awhile you will find the places they prefer. If you just put in the time it will come faster than you think.
     
  6. lebeaux

    lebeaux New Member

    Messages:
    152
    State:
    ohio
    Good call, Skip & Jason, I've tried to explain it in those terms to people also. I liken it to bow hunting for deer. You wouldn't go buy a bow and sit in a spot you're unfamiliar with because a deer MIGHT be there. That'd be a waste of time and you'd be relying totally on luck. Successful white tail hunters KNOW there are deer in the area because they've done thier homework. They've scouted the area @ different times of day/ season/ year and the more they've scouted, the less they're relying on luck. It's the same for flatheads. You're just after a different animal by a different means.
     
  7. getthenet

    getthenet New Member

    Messages:
    264
    State:
    ohio
    yea you are right skip and rollo. ive did alot of scouting salt fork ive caught some really nice fish last 5 years. i know that when i go to the lake im gonna get a nice fish if i dont then they are not biting or weather has changed there pattern.im gonna give it try tonight
     
  8. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

    Messages:
    6,894
    State:
    Ohio
    thanks for the props guys.. fishing is a sport i truely love.. more than anything else including hunting. i like to do well, and like to hear of others doing well. i try to post what i think i know..not necessarily what is right. just an opinion from my experiences. like i said, this is a learning process for me as well, and i'm sure in a lifetime we could never possibly know everything needed.. thats what makes it a competitive sport, fun one...and one that keeps us pursuing and wondering..they are elusive creatures!!! so, please post your opinions and views as well... trust me i have been doing this long enough, and have seen them caught sooo many different ways, and different places, nothing suprises me much anymore..lol.. goodluck, thanks for your posts...rollo
     
  9. lebeaux

    lebeaux New Member

    Messages:
    152
    State:
    ohio
    That's why there should be a collaboration between biologists and anglers when it comes to conservation and fish behavior. Too often are we @ the mercy of biologists telling us what we already know, or worse yet, what we know to be untrue. You cannot replace years of observation with a college degree. I know people with biology degrees. They're very adament and steadfast when telling you what they've learned or been told in a classroom. They believe it to be true because they paid someone to tell them it is. In my opinion, you cannot replace the invaluable info gathered through years and years of experience on the water. Make my classroom a Lowe any day:wink:
     
  10. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

    Messages:
    6,894
    State:
    Ohio
    you are right... lots of biologists or even state people can shock fish, do their surveys etc. but, that doesn't tell me anything more but than the area and conditions. kinda like being told about a hole or spot..but the person unaware of the water, structure, and usual movements of the fish can go to a spot i fish and have limited sucess, but i could pull in an hour later and catch fish behind them, or around them. sometimes them only missing a certain area or spot by yrds. i have seen this in tournaments.. and it doesn't really have as much to do with technique. more with knowing the bottom layout..structure, etc. after a while it becomes second nature to you. not really needing a graph to get you there. thats when you know your stretch!! rollo