DONT MISS THE GRAVY TRAIN $$$$

Discussion in 'General Conversation' started by Catfish_Commando, Apr 14, 2007.

  1. Catfish_Commando

    Catfish_Commando TF Staff Member

    Messages:
    7,005
    State:
    Georgia
    I have had the pleasure of speaking with many of the civilians that are working in this part of Iraq, they come from all over, and do a wide range of jobs.

    One thing is common among all, they are making fat bank.

    From the ones I can get to fess up, and guestimation, most are earning over $80,000 annually, and the 1st $80,000 earned is Tax Free.

    Security guys can reach $275,000 annually.

    The most common schedule is (7) 12 hour days.

    If you have the flexibility, this is something to look into for those members who may want to try something different.

    Life for most of them isnt to far off the beaten path from what they enjoyed in the States, with an occasonal mortar or rocket.

    Most of their goals, based on age is:

    Younger> Money in the Bank

    Older> Pay of the mortgage / retire

    It may be something looking into for you?

    The Train comes around about every 10-15 years, and after this expendature of Tax Payer money, this train may never run again at this speed.

    Paul
     
  2. BIG GEORGE

    BIG GEORGE New Member

    Messages:
    10,362
    State:
    JOISY
    Yikes! Any vacancies for an old cook? LOL!
     

  3. Catfish_Commando

    Catfish_Commando TF Staff Member

    Messages:
    7,005
    State:
    Georgia
    Demographics:

    Youngest Civilian Talked with: 20

    Job: Admin Assistant

    Pay: $70 G

    Oldest Civilian Talked with: 67

    Job: A/C

    Pay: $140 G
     
  4. Cheryl

    Cheryl Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,010
    State:
    TN
    WOW<

    Checking into boats and planes over there, now.

    Great post, Boss.

    Thanks!
    Cheryl

    P.S. Wonder if we could get a BOC/SOC convoy up for a company????
     
  5. ryang

    ryang Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,338
    State:
    Blacklick, Ohio
    Name:
    Gary
    How about some contact informatin Paul??? I could do with some of that scratch
     
  6. Catfish_Commando

    Catfish_Commando TF Staff Member

    Messages:
    7,005
    State:
    Georgia
    There are all types of contractors here:

    Security
    Maintenance
    Custodial
    Etc...

    The biggest one is KBR.

    Do a Google search for KBR and on their website they have job listings that are available. Last time I looked they had a wide variety that was open.

    One of the guys also said he found his job by just searching, "Jobs In Iraq".

    They do a lot of hiring from other nations, since they can pay cheaper wages, but from what I see, there is always an American riding shotgun.
     
  7. Cheryl

    Cheryl Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,010
    State:
    TN
    Heck I'd be happy with my tax free 80G and could live comfortably for a couple more years, and by then I'd get bored and have to bark orders again.....:roll_eyes:

    Becky told me she could tell I was ready to go back to work, when I started the 'brick' project, then when she heard me 'gently' telling my helpers how to manage their time and do it the easiest way, she laughed and said, yep, time for you to go back to work.........LMAO.
     
  8. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Wouldn't you just know it? I can't find a single opening for someone to launch nuclear missiles.
     
  9. rebelzgrl76

    rebelzgrl76 New Member

    Messages:
    1,359
    State:
    CO
    My friend back home, her husband worked for 2 years with KBR. If any of you that I emailed realized it, I forward emails/received emails from him while he was stationed in Iraq working. For the most part, the worst was just being gone for several months at a time. He went to church, rode a bicycle cause walking was more troublesome, I presumed. He was in his 50's in age. They have bought a new vehicle, and added on to there home(all done by his wife while he was in Iraq). He is now home since Feb. He enjoyed working over there and talked alot about the ppl that he worked with. He made very good money while over there. But I have always told my husband, Life aint about a buck!

    Thanks Paul for the info.
     
  10. cook

    cook New Member

    Messages:
    1,494
    State:
    Plattsburg,Mo.(near K.C.)
    BigGeorge,leave me out of this:lol:
     
  11. Flatheadhunter33

    Flatheadhunter33 New Member

    Messages:
    3,764
    State:
    Yuma, Arizona
    Got two buddies doing that very thing. Both got out of the Corps and went over to work on the civilian side. One works for KBR at a laundry facility (I think). The other is doing security (I dont know where). Both are making really good money from what they say...
     
  12. chuck99

    chuck99 New Member

    Messages:
    95
    State:
    Georgia
    It is a double edged sword:

    As of Feb 23 this year, nearly 800 civilians working under contract to the Pentagon have been killed and more than 3,300 hurt doing jobs normally handled by the U.S. military, according to figures gathered by The Associated Press.

    Employees of defense contractors such as Halliburton, Blackwater and Wackenhut cook meals, do laundry, repair infrastruture, translate documents, analyze intelligence, guard prisoners, protect military convoys, deliver water in the heavily fortified Green Zone and stand sentry at buildings — often highly dangerous duties almost identical to those performed by many U.S. troops.

    The U.S. has outsourced so many war and reconstruction duties that there are almost as many contractors (120,000) as U.S. troops (135,000) in the war zone.

    The insurgents in Iraq make little if any distinction between the contractors and U.S. troops.

    In January, four contractors for Blackwater were killed when their helicopter was downed by gunfire in Baghdad. In 2004, two Americans and a British engineer were kidnapped and decapitated. That same year, a mob of insurgents ambushed a supply convoy escorted by contractors, burning and mutilating the guards' bodies and stringing up two of them from a bridge.

    But when contractors are killed or wounded, the casualties are off the books, in a sense.

    While the Defense Department issues a press release whenever a soldier or Marine dies, the AP had to file a Freedom of Information Act request to obtain figures on pre-2006 civilian deaths and injuries from the Labor Department, which tracks workers' compensation claims.
    By the end of 2006, the Labor Department had quietly recorded 769 deaths and 3,367 injuries serious enough to require four or more days off the job.
     
  13. BIG GEORGE

    BIG GEORGE New Member

    Messages:
    10,362
    State:
    JOISY
    Did we really think the $$$$$ were for what they were doin vs. where they were doin it.
     
  14. DANZIG

    DANZIG New Member

    Messages:
    6,672
    State:
    West Virginia
    Been there done that for CSA in Kuwait in '03. Some folks might like it but I could not recommend it.

    If you are comfortable with military style employment, as in shut-up and do not worry about how bad we are screwing you, it may be for you.

    It may have just been the company I worked for, but I was promised the moon here in the States and told "in country", "CSA is not responsible for the agreements made by the US representatives."
    Lies and back-stabbing abound and,in truth, I have never met a group of Americans I could trust less.

    The hours were long, the pay was fair, but Management felt they had you trapped and could deal with you as they pleased.(They found out different) And don't even get me started on the dessert environment, why anyone would choose to live there is beyond me.

    On the bright side, I really enjoyed working with our Soldiers (Captains and on down anyway) and most all of our TCNs, even the Arabs, and would have happily brought many of the guys from Nepal back to the USA to work and live in my neighborhood.
    Felt terrible about the way the TCNs were treated. Make no mistake, though their pay was good for their countries, our tax dollars buy slaves. Treat your dog that way here and they throw you in jail.

    That was my experience. I think I would rather remove my own spleen with a spoon and needle-nose pliers than do that again.