Dog pen

Discussion in 'General Conversation' started by Rat, May 30, 2006.

  1. Rat

    Rat New Member

    Messages:
    236
    State:
    Forrest Illinoi
    I have a black lab and when we let him out in the back yard to do his business, he seems to always urinate in a 10x10 foot area, which killed all the grass. Now when it rains and we let him out, he's got a big mud hole to walk through. My yard is fenced in, but I'm in the process of taking most of it down. Except I'm gonna leave a 16X21 foot area fenced just for doggy business that the back door opens into. To get away from the mud, I'm taking all the wood fence panels I'm taking down and covering the ground inside the 16X21 foot area, then I'm gonna get about 9 tons of pea gravel and cover up the fence panels on the ground to a depth of about 4 inches. My question is, will this work to keep the gravel from sinking into the ground over time? I didn't want to put plastic down due to it holding rain and doggy pee that soaks through the gravel. Anyone have a problem like this and a good fix? I know one thing. Pulling fence posts in 90 degree heat ain't my idea of a good time.
    Rat
     
  2. Cyclops01

    Cyclops01 New Member

    Messages:
    578
    State:
    Eden, NC.
    Rat,

    Your right not to use plastic. The [er, ah] "stuff" won't have any way to drain off, between the plastic and gravel. But likewise, the "stuff" will leach into the wood and create a bacterial breading ground of biblical proportions. To compound the problem, the gravel will make cleanup a real pain in the dorsal portion. You're taking a big chance with the health of the dog as well as a stench that won't go away.

    The absolute best solution is rather cost prohibitive and that is a concrete slab. It's easy to hose down and spray with bacteria killing chemicals. I've never tried it but, those horse stall mat panels (Tractor Supply) might also provide a viable option.
     

  3. Rat

    Rat New Member

    Messages:
    236
    State:
    Forrest Illinoi
    Mike, I was hoping the 1/2 inch gap between the fence slats would allow for drainage. Darn and double darn. Looks like it's back to the drawing board. Thanks for the insight, I appreciate it.
    Rat
     
  4. catsmith1

    catsmith1 New Member

    Messages:
    1,073
    State:
    Haughton, Louisiana
    If you like the idea of pea gravel, get some of that black stuff that goes over your flower beds to keep the weeds from growing. It will let the moisture thru and will let it dry out after a rain. You can just lay it on the ground and cover it with gravel.
     
  5. Dano

    Dano New Member

    Messages:
    13,712
    State:
    Texas
    mike's right about concrete slab. I know people who have done that. They just hose it down now and then. Seems to work good for them.
     
  6. solomon

    solomon New Member

    Messages:
    735
    State:
    MS
    If you really want to get fancy with it, you build the slab and build a concrete catch basin behind it to wash everything over into and tie in a drain from the basin into your septic line.
     
  7. Dano

    Dano New Member

    Messages:
    13,712
    State:
    Texas

    Now that is a smart ideal.
     
  8. solomon

    solomon New Member

    Messages:
    735
    State:
    MS
    Everybody here with deer dogs does this, except they live in the country so they just run a field drain from the basin. Makes for a clean pen, and it dosen't stink.
     
  9. Fatkat

    Fatkat New Member

    Messages:
    979
    State:
    Blanchester, Ohio
    Wouldn't that fill up your septic tank during heavy rains? Just a thought.
     
  10. solomon

    solomon New Member

    Messages:
    735
    State:
    MS
    That's a good point. Most of the ones that I've seen are under roof, and like I said they have a seperate field drain. I don't imagine though that under roof they'd catch any more rain water than what you're washing into it with the hose. You have to think though that these are $5k dog pens. These people love their dogs. :big_smile: Might not be practical in rat's situation.