Dog Drives in South Carolina

Discussion in 'Deer Hunting' started by RedEye_Allen, Aug 20, 2005.

  1. RedEye_Allen

    RedEye_Allen New Member

    Messages:
    14
    State:
    Red Bank , South Carolina
    Hey Guys,

    Like the New Site Still going to miss the old.

    Anyway Was Wondering if anyone Knew of Some Dog Drive Hunt Clubs In South Carolina. I used to Hunt with White Circle Hunt Club Down in Bamberg with my Father when i was about 13 or so Been 8 Years Since I been down there was told it was No longer a Active Club. .

    Just looking around see if anyone knows of any.

    Thanks
     
  2. flaboy

    flaboy New Member

    Messages:
    616
    State:
    Wedgefield, SC
    Hey Dude, just about all the dog hunters around myrtle beach have given up and moved inland or started doing field trials on coyotes/ foxes in large (100 acre) pens. I also enjoyed dog huntin in my youth (3-4 years ago) LOL but I really enjoy still hunting in the mountians (WV) quiet, peaceful and no one around to see ya if the deer jumps the bullet (Hey, archers use this excuse) LOL
    Best of all, cell phones do't work back where I go.
     

  3. Southernraised84

    Southernraised84 New Member

    Messages:
    207
    State:
    Fayettnam, North Carolina
    I dont know of any in SC.I used to go when i was younger here in NC havent been for awhile though.I think i might get back into it.I really miss the excitment of chaseing them deer.Not tryin to hijack a post but does anyone know of any good clubs in NC and SC area.(so it doesnt focus on NC alone sorry)
     
  4. flaboy

    flaboy New Member

    Messages:
    616
    State:
    Wedgefield, SC
    I have heard that there was a club near marion sc that doghunts but I have no other info. the co I work for has bought out one of the last ones around here and closed it :eek:
     
  5. blackwaterkatz

    blackwaterkatz Active Member

    Messages:
    3,659
    State:
    Andrews, SC
    Sadly, dog hunting is gradually going away in South Carolina. The reasons are varied, but population growth and anti-hunting pressure are certainly part of the reason. There are a lot of people in SC now, particularly along the immediate coast, that were not raised up around hunting, and they don’t understand when they see someone riding around with a dead animal on their tailgate, nor do they appreciate hunters turning their dogs loose, knowing the dogs will cross private property, or standing along public roads with shotguns. (In other words, a few slob hunters can make it bad for all the good ones.) Safety is an issue, with the influx of housing developments. The larger land owning companies along the coast are beginning to ban dog hunting at lease renewal, so availability of property is an issue. There are still lots of private clubs, but the numbers are dwindling. I was raised up dog hunting, and still enjoy listening to them run, but I don’t participate anymore, because of the lack of respect shown by a few of the hunters I used to hunt with, some of whom are still my friends. I only do still or stand hunting these days, and enjoy it much more.
     
  6. rango

    rango New Member

    Messages:
    21
    State:
    south carolina
    dont they still have the hunts at aiken and mcbee? they are dog hunts. check em out.
     
  7. blackwaterkatz

    blackwaterkatz Active Member

    Messages:
    3,659
    State:
    Andrews, SC
    As far as I know, they do still have hunts at Aiken, and other places. I didn't mean to sound like dog hunting is gone, just that it may be on the way out over time. There are still a lot of clubs around that do dog hunts, but I'm not familiar with most of them.
     
  8. RedEye_Allen

    RedEye_Allen New Member

    Messages:
    14
    State:
    Red Bank , South Carolina
    I am Just dieing to get back out there. Havn't done anything but Stand hunts the past 4 - 5 Years.

    Theres No Fealing like the Rush you get when you here 10 Dogs Barking and Baying with a Big Dear In Front of em.

    If anyone knows some General Locations / Directions to one of these Places that allow Visitors i'd Appriciated it .
     
  9. blackwaterkatz

    blackwaterkatz Active Member

    Messages:
    3,659
    State:
    Andrews, SC
    Baitfish, no offense taken, my friend. Let me explain a little about the sport in our state, and maybe it will help you understand the local's side of the story.
    We may be the only state that still allows dog hunting, most never have. The terrain here is unique due to the thick swamps and bays. Many years ago, compared to modern days, the land was undeveloped, roads were few, and deer were also much less numerous. People spent most of their daylight hours trying to make a living from small farms, and the most efficient method of hunting was to use dogs to drive the deer from the thick cover. This has been a tradition in South Carolina ever since, and the hunters enjoy it just as much as fox hunting, raccoons, or anything else where dogs are used. It is as much a social event as it is a need for meat.
    We are blessed these days, thanks to game management and outdoor license revenue to have an awful lot of deer, however, the population growth has infringed on their territory, but the influx of out-of-state people and the numbers of people who don't hunt, causes problems, too. They don't want Bambi eating their expensive shrubbery in their overcrowded housing developments, but at the same time they don't want the deer thinned out through hunting practices. They don't understand why when they call DNR about the problem, very little gets done. Trapping and relocating doesn't help either. The farmers are having lots of problems with over-populated deer destroying crops. The actual harvest has fallen in the state, but the deer population continued growing, although it appears to be stabilizing some according to some information I've read.
    Large land owners are hesitant to allow dog hunting on their properties due to liability issues caused the some of the things stated in an earlier post, so the dog hunters are slowly running out of large tracts of land to hunt on. Dog hunting isn't a good thing on most small tracts, because the dogs don't know where boundary lines are, which creates more problems with adjoining land owners.
    I don't dog hunt any more either, because of the problems mentioned above, but I do realize it is a tradition here, and many people want it to stay.
    As an individual, I can harvest more deer annually through still hunting than I ever did when I dog hunted, but I choose to harvest only what I can use or give away to friends, therefore the property that I hunt has too many deer, especially does. I need to thin them out to improve the quality of the herd, but I won't do it unless I can put the meat to use, and I'm working on that.
     
  10. sam9266

    sam9266 New Member

    Messages:
    35
    State:
    Albany, GA
    I once sat there and listened to this fancy smancy lawyer guy dressed in all of his high dollar hunting clothes,boots,special vest, etc. carrying a shotgun worth as much as my truck down talk people who hunted deer with dogs. He said it was just "uncivilized" and not proper to hunt that way. He then went over the bushes where the pointer was and kicked the bush and unloaded his gun on a covey of quail (probably pen raised) that rose. Something just didnt seem right with his argument about deer hunters... can you tell me what the difference is between a dog chaseing a deer for you verses a dog holding a covey of quail until someone comes up and has to kick them in the butt to force them into shooting distance?
    I dont dog hunt for deer but I have. I dont hunt for quail much with dogs but I have. Im not against either one. I think there is something to be said for tradition and have no problem with people who hunt using dogs.. the problem is with not having the land needed to hunt dogs this way. Many of the larger tracts of land have been broken up and sold over the years and since I havnt seen a dog that could read and obey a "NO TRESPASSING" sign yet they cross on to others land that do not want the dogs or dog hunting on their property. I think the days of the "average" man hunting with dogs is about over and the only ones left will be very large land owners or special large gruops that have joined forces and money to lease LARGE tracts of land suitable for running dogs.

    Just my opinion...... Sam
     
  11. blackwaterkatz

    blackwaterkatz Active Member

    Messages:
    3,659
    State:
    Andrews, SC
    Again, no offense is taken. There may be a misconception that the dogs run deer until they drop, but that is not so. A deer can easily stay ahead of dogs, and is rarely caught unless wounded or diseased. Believe me, many times more deer escape unscathed than are shot. Usually, the dogs are caught by their handlers after they have run or nearly run out of the hunt area, then the hunters gather up, swap tales about the one that got away, and another hunt takes place. These deer can take a pack of dogs on a long, circling chase, and the older bucks can really pull of some amazing escapes. At the end of a long day, sometimes there is nothing to show for the hunt except memories, same as any other hunt.
    I know I probably sound like a dedicated dog hunter...I'm not. I just support traditions, which often are falling by the wayside these days.
     
  12. flaboy

    flaboy New Member

    Messages:
    616
    State:
    Wedgefield, SC
    Baitfish, if you could see the shenagans I have seen dog hunting! also there is something about the sound of dogs early in the mornin, tryin to keep up with a deer that will circle, cross other tracks and generally just stay ahead of them till they lose it or a hunter harvests it!
    I enjoy still huntin and thats mostly all I do but I have fond memories.
    Like blackwaterkats, there are not so many places big enough to dog hunt anymore. Thats a shame.
    did I tell you of the hunter, tryin to head the dogs (pushin 3 bucks runnin together) that jumped outta his truck, fired a round in the air, pulled down on the bucks as they came by and pulled, and pulled. he had grabbed his friends pump (his was a semi) he never did jack another round in the chamber till they were gone! (did I mention he pulled the trigger!!!) anyway all three waved their flags to everyone that day!
    of course several of us reminded him you have to pump a pump!, a coupla times? :D
     
  13. blackwaterkatz

    blackwaterkatz Active Member

    Messages:
    3,659
    State:
    Andrews, SC
    I've enjoyed the thread, Baitfish. Like Flaboy I have seen those bucks make blubbering idiots out of plenty of hunters (me included). I must be getting older than I feel, because I find myself reminiscing a lot these days, and missing so many of the things I grew up around, that aren't here anymore. (Good riddance to some of them, though, like 'suckering' tobacco, but that's another story)
     
  14. flaboy

    flaboy New Member

    Messages:
    616
    State:
    Wedgefield, SC
    Oh, in the same catagory, did I mention the time three of us were in a pickup goin thru a orande grove on emeralda island (susposed to be a indian grove) when we saw a rabbit jump up to hop off. (mentioned on old site) we saw three jumps then over a small bush, then it split and ran off to both sides of the dirt track we were on. I Still speculate It hit a blade of sawgrass!
     
  15. SSG Johnson

    SSG Johnson New Member

    Messages:
    638
    State:
    Saint Robert Missouri
    I remember when i was young that the neighbor hunted with dogs in Miss. I have never done it and dont think I would but im with Baitfish on this one if it is legal than gitter done. I know around here that hogs are hunted with dogs and I have always wanted to go on a hog hunt with dogs I think that would be fun. My only thing about hunting deer with dogs is I dont like to shoot at a running deer so it would be hard for me to pull the trigger. I dont think its much different than a deer drive where hunter line up on one side of a thicket and use humans to push the deer out the other side. I think I would have to experiance the dog hunt before I could really make an informed judgement. Hunting to me is just like you guys said its about making memories with friends and family.
     
  16. blackwaterkatz

    blackwaterkatz Active Member

    Messages:
    3,659
    State:
    Andrews, SC
    Dog driving can be fun, and those deer can really move. We use shotguns with buckshot, since rifles or slugs can travel too far. You will also see here another reason why a lot of hunters prefer to let the dogs do the driving in South Carolina. My grandson killed this rattler today (5-1/2 ft. long, w/19 rattles, 1-1/4" fangs) while scouting. Our deer season starts as early as Aug. 15, when there are still a lot of snakes around.
     
  17. VerotiK

    VerotiK New Member

    Messages:
    230
    State:
    Harrison, Arkansas
    There has been quite a debate this year in Arkansas about running dogs. I think the Game & Fish commission finally decided to let them do it in one part of the state on government land. Remember, this is only my opinion and its not meant to offend anyone. I think the idea is rediculous. I know there is tradition behind it and all, but i dont really think its a safe way to hunt. Maybe im wrong, because admittedly, i know very little about hunting deer with dogs, but it seems like it would be very easy for someone to take a shot at a running deer and miss. Im not the best shot in the world, but i can hold a 1" pattern at 100 yards with my 50 year old .270. Where i hunt, im not gonna get a shot over 40 yards, so i feel very confident in that, but myself, i'd never take a shot at a running deer. I feel it is unethical, even if you are a crack shot. Between the animal running and dodging cover in its path and outside elements like wind, it just doesn't seem like a good idea. And another reason is, i dont want people running dogs onto my land and chasing the deer of my land and back to them so they can kill them without doing any of the work that i think you need to do to be a ethical & successful hunter. If it is legal where you live, then i agree, its good to go. I just hope if it gets made legal here, that there are some strict regulations about invading other landowners property with dogs.
     
  18. jim

    jim New Member

    Messages:
    2,579
    State:
    Jacksonville NC
    One of the original reasons dog hunting evolved in the south was that it wasn't possible for humans to get into some of the swamps ,bogs etc.The deer would just stay in there and defy you to come and get them.From that aspect I suppose it is ok.There is much dog hunting here in this area of NC.I live on the New River here in Jacksonville and several times I have watched deer both bucks and does swim the river onto my property to avoid dogs.One doe was so exhausted that she collapsed under a tree and couldn't move even when I went down to see if she was ok.She eventually recovered but stayed in my yard eating the abundant acorns etc until after the hunting season.During the season the deer are very smart and congregate in my housing area which has forested plots along the river until after the season.I really see dog hunting as a thing of the past simply because of the trespass situation.The dogs can't be controlled and many are shot by irate hunters in stands on adjacent land.Secondly the owners frequently trespass when trying to retreive their dogs.Third and saddest of all many of the dogs are abandoned.I can't count how many dogs my range inspectors pick up each season as do the local sheriffs,police,and animal welfare techs.The dogs end up killed all over the higways and roads in this area,the Peta folks get upset etc.No one can assess the effect on the deer because no one goes out and counts the fawns that can't out run the dogs or the stress factors etc that may lead to exhaustion and death.I am pro hunting and have personally harvested many deer,whitetail,blacktail, coues and mule and fully support harvest as a management tool but I don't much see any real good coming out of dog hunting for deer or dogs. As Tommy says it is an old tradition,but it may have outlived its time.The worst thing is to see the lost and abandoned dogs starving to death as they wander along the roads.Most good dog hunters make every attempt to recover them but plenty dont and the bad feeling is building towards this type of hunting.
     
  19. SSG Johnson

    SSG Johnson New Member

    Messages:
    638
    State:
    Saint Robert Missouri
    I don't think I could condone someone leaving a dog like that it would certainly turn me off to the idea. Like was said in the crossbow poll and I think is correct there are bad hunters without ethics everywhere and it doesn't matter whether they are running dogs or using a crossbow, bow, rifle, or shotgun. Its a shame that people cant see that unethical hunting practices ruin it for everyone. I'm not calling the practice of running dogs unethical don't get me wrong but leaving an animal to starve that is just something that is wrong no matter how you look at it.
     
  20. blackwaterkatz

    blackwaterkatz Active Member

    Messages:
    3,659
    State:
    Andrews, SC
    Sadly, Jim, there are a very few (hopefully!) unethical hunters, as in many other sports, that set a bad example for all the others out there that try to abide by rules and morals. I also see dogs turned loose after deer season ends, and it tears me up. Fortunately, there are many more hunters that do tend to their animals, but the bad things always outshine the good.
    As I said in an earlier post, I don't dog hunt anymore, for just some of the reasons listed here. But despite the existence of a certain number of 'slob' hunters (and fishermen), I know there are many more good ones out there. Like you said, dog hunting has probably outlived it's time, and the slobs are only speeding up it's demise.