Does River's turn over like lakes

Discussion in 'MISSOURI RIVERS TALK' started by jayriverrat, Oct 4, 2005.

  1. jayriverrat

    jayriverrat New Member

    Messages:
    14
    State:
    Arnold, MO
    Hey Guy's this might be a crazy or stupid question, but I really don't know the answer, Does River's turn over like lakes do and when do you think they do if they do? so if anyone knows please let me know.

    Jason
     
  2. Gator

    Gator New Member

    Messages:
    1,116
    State:
    Ludowici GA
    First off there is no such thing as a stupid question unless I ask it that is….LOL but to be honest with you I really don’t know for sure. But, I would think that because the water is always moving on a river that it would not turn over like a lake. But, now remember I don’t know for sure.
     

  3. quadman

    quadman New Member

    Messages:
    98
    State:
    Danville, Virginia
    I would have to agree with Gator. It would seem that the constantly moving water would keep it from doing it. I have heard that anyway but who knows.
     
  4. Kittyhunter

    Kittyhunter New Member

    Messages:
    291
    State:
    Princeton, NC
    OK this might be a stupid question. What the heck are y'all talking about "turning over"?
     
  5. Gator

    Gator New Member

    Messages:
    1,116
    State:
    Ludowici GA
    It is when colder water rises and the warmer water sinks or vise-a-versa.
     
  6. crazy

    crazy New Member

    Messages:
    2,090
    State:
    Kansas CIty, MO
    Nope rivers don't turn over nor do they have a thermocline.
     
  7. Gator

    Gator New Member

    Messages:
    1,116
    State:
    Ludowici GA
    Thanks crazy I was not sure, but did not know that about the thermocline. That’s good to know.
     
  8. Kittyhunter

    Kittyhunter New Member

    Messages:
    291
    State:
    Princeton, NC
    Never heard of that.
     
  9. crazy

    crazy New Member

    Messages:
    2,090
    State:
    Kansas CIty, MO
    After thinking about the thermocline some more I’m not so sure. I guess if it's a real slow moving river like almost a lake. There could be? Basically the thermocline is the separation of warm and cold water kind of like layers of sheets on a bed. So a thermocline would have a different temperature up top then at the bottom of the lake. But with a river you have the current mixing top layer of water with the bottom layer of water making it the same temperature from top to bottom. Since the water is cycling like this from top to bottom it also makes sure there is oxygen from top to bottom. Just like a pump in your aquarium cycling the water. This would also cause it to not turn over. Anyone jump in and correct me if I’m wrong here. :)
     
  10. fishingbuddy4

    fishingbuddy4 New Member

    Messages:
    1,564
    State:
    Warner Rob ga
    There was a study done about five years ago on catfishing and the thermocline,the study found out that rivers like the ohio river and some rivers that have dams and locks that slow the water down to a craw do turn over ,but rivers like the mo. that ussally run about 100000cfs keep the water temp about the same from top to bottom never turn over.
     
  11. crazy

    crazy New Member

    Messages:
    2,090
    State:
    Kansas CIty, MO
    Wow 100,000 I'm glad I live north of there it's running about 58,000cfs's here right now. Thanks fishingbuddy, I was wondering about the real slow moving rivers we have out east. You would think though that the under water currents would help prevent this. Most the hard information I could find on this matter related to where rivers dumped into the ocean.
     
  12. gofish

    gofish New Member

    Messages:
    658
    State:
    Greenville MS
    Water is most dense at about 4-5* C (about 39* F). Cooler water will fall and warmer water will rise. During the summer, the water temperature at the surface will be warmer than water at the bottom. As fall approaches, the surface temperatures cool and eventually become colder than the water at the bottom. This causes the surface water to sink and the lower water to rise. This is known as Fall Turnover.

    There is an excellent explanation of this here: http://www.conservation.state.mo.us/fish/ponds/laketurn/

    I do not believe that constantly flowing rivers would experience turnover as such. I think that rivers are in a constant state of turnover or turmoil.