Does a canoe equal good excercise?

Discussion in 'General Conversation' started by Environmentor, Dec 22, 2005.

  1. Environmentor

    Environmentor New Member

    Messages:
    95
    State:
    Buffalo, Iowa
    I have a small johnboat, which I usually use - '69 Sears, for the smaller lakes, its about 10 ft long and very thin and shallow that works pretty good with 50 pound thrust trolling motor. I also have a '70 Crestliner that is 16 ft. long semi-V that I use on the Mississippi River with 15 hp.

    I have been looking for a prowler type boat (about a year) that is under $500 and is very sturdy and portable and with high sides or good weight capacity, to more or less replace my old johnboat. Then I figure I will buy a bike for (much needed) excercise.

    I have also been thinking the last few weeks about getting a VERY small canoe or a one person kayak. This would give me some (much needed) excercise by rowing, too. However, I could also be fishing. I would want one that is portable and would be VERY stable for about $500, also.

    I would like to hear your thoughts on this. Should I get a canoe and use all three boats (semi-V, johnboat, and canoe/kayak), or should I just totally replace my johnboat with a prowler and buy a bike for excercise? I mean, I've been in a canoe (my parents own canoes), but how much excercise is it compared to a bike? Would it be better to get a bike and ride it about 3 times a week for about 5 miles (which would cut into my fishing time) or would it be better just to take a canoe out in place of my johnboat about once a week fishing and paddling around my local lakes. I know I would probably stick to a canoeing regime. Does anybody know any sites or charts that show calories burned biking and paddling vs. distance or length of time?

    Also, what makes/models would be good for me?

    P.S. I am looking at losing weight and strengthening my heart, not muscular training.
     
  2. dinkbuster1

    dinkbuster1 New Member

    Messages:
    2,272
    State:
    Ohio
    there is no comparison between a bike and a canoe, youll get way more exercise on a bike! my mountain bike helped me lose 150 lbs bout 4 years ago. its amazing how many calories you can burn on an hour ride. i do both actually but its hard to get a partner to canoe with me anymore. maybe two, three times a year. thinking about getting a kayak myself for next year.
     

  3. SSG Johnson

    SSG Johnson New Member

    Messages:
    638
    State:
    Saint Robert Missouri
    You will be way better off for weight loss riding a bike however it is not as good as running but better than walking..... The bike uses the largest muscles in the body well not the largest as that is the glutes but next to the largest the quads and calfs. Canoing would use the arms and would not give you really what you are looking for unless you are power rowing using your legs as well as your arms by pushing off. I don't think you can do that in a canoe. Jump out of the boat and swim for about an hour that will help allot. If you are way out of shape dont try to break the bank at first ease into it. Remember that old addage no pain no gain.......? You dont want to do that if it hurts its your body telling you that you have gone to far. Ease into it and it will be ok. Hills on a bike will help more than just straight rideing. Remember also that you have to push yourself but dont try and push throught pain. Lifting weights will also help a leg press will work those muscle and combined with a bike will really produce results fast. Now with that said dont try to lose too much too fast that can be dangerous as well as unheathly.
     
  4. flathunter

    flathunter New Member

    Messages:
    5,723
    State:
    Ohio
    I bought a brand new old town canoe last year..I had it on the water one time, and sold it..It scared me to death how tippy it was, and I cant swim!
     
  5. dinkbuster1

    dinkbuster1 New Member

    Messages:
    2,272
    State:
    Ohio
    lol , should have seen my big but when i first started. know what you mean flathunter, i was terrified but i got over it. you just need to take it to some shallow ponds or streams at first to get used to it and know its limits. practice tipping over and getting back in it. actually the more weight you have in it the more stable it is. took me bout two years to feel really comfortable. those old towns are really tipsy anyway. a canoe can be a small river fishermans best freind. sold my 17 foot aluminum and got a 15 foot plastic one from dicks for 250. beleive it or not its a really sturdy canoe. the past three winters my crazy freinds and i have taken it out at night when theres a lot of snow (and no cops) and go baha'in with it through the city behind my blazer. hit curbs, trees and its still holdin up.
     
  6. dinkbuster1

    dinkbuster1 New Member

    Messages:
    2,272
    State:
    Ohio
    oh yeah, i swim like a rock too!
     
  7. FS Driver

    FS Driver New Member

    Messages:
    2,323
    State:
    swansea,illinoi
    think i would keep the jon and do the bike routine for exercise
    why take a chance in a canoe when you have much more stability in a jon
    i wouldnt want to catch a large fish in a canoe.
    that is if you fish from a watercraft.
    i wouldnt take anything that couldnt be parted with easily in a canoe
    too tipsy for my likeing.:eek:
     
  8. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    Canoes aren't necessarily unstable. I've owned one over twenty years and never turned it over and have been on some pretty big lakes. As for exercise, paddling equals walking, biking, or running in use of calories and just about every other measure. My current fishing craft is a small recreational kayak. Its very stable and is great exercise. I usually paddle two miles or so to my fishing spots. Take a look at texaskayakfisherman.com, kayakfishingstuff.com and do a search on kayak fishing. Some of those guys go off shore and tangle with BIG sharks, tarpon, even marlin.
     
  9. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

    Messages:
    5,444
    State:
    Henderson,Ky
    A canoe wil build upper body strength and burn calories at the same time. I have been whitewater canoeing and it is a blast, but it is not for the novice canoer, if you know what I mean, LOL!!! It can be a very stress releiving sport at times, just paddling along, enjoying nature at it's best.
     
  10. BIG GEORGE

    BIG GEORGE New Member

    Messages:
    10,362
    State:
    JOISY
    Bottom line is and take this from a fat man, if ya wanna lose weight cut down on the caloric intake. LOL! Also,be carefull of that exercise,it will kill ya. LOL! What ya eat and how ya eat it will have a great impact on the weight.

    Just remember one thing. Nobody has a weight problem its a height problem!
     
  11. Catbird

    Catbird New Member

    Messages:
    294
    State:
    Fayetteville, Ohio
    Environmentor, take your $500 and purchase a set of oars and oar locks for your john boat and row around in it. You always have the trolling motor if you get tired. You can send me the balance for the advice...lol
     
  12. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    Are jon boats all that stable? I've seen a few upside down ones. More than a few people fall out of them, not talking about drunks, when leaning over too far. Used to have a deep and wide 12 footer, much more stable than a regular 14 footer, and the thing scared me to death if the a big wind came up.
     
  13. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

    Messages:
    5,444
    State:
    Henderson,Ky
    If iI was in a twelve foot anything on the water, and a wind came up, I would be scared too, LOL!!!
     
  14. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    A 12 foot deep and wide Ouachita, my old boat, is deeper and wider than almost any regular 14 footer and more stable. But for stability, I prefer my 9.6 ft kayak. It'll take some pretty good wind and wave action. Problem with jon boats is they aren't meant for big water for the most part and too many people overload and/or over power them. And they do damn fool things in them.
     
  15. Mark J

    Mark J New Member

    Messages:
    9,407
    State:
    Four Oaks, NC
    Like kayaks canoes come in many different varieties.
    You have the touring and sport models.
    Some for the advanced some for the beginner.
     
  16. gadzooks

    gadzooks New Member

    Messages:
    1,532
    State:
    Kingwood, Tx (Houston)
    Old Town sells some nice starter type canoes. If you want one to fish out of, will be taking more than one person, and aren't worried about speed, the Guide series is a good one, wide and stable. Canoe stability is often related to the bottom design. A flat bottom will be more stable initially than a round one, but may not take as much lean. There are variations that combine each. Also, a wider canoe is more stable in general, though can't be paddled as faster. Length usuallly equals speed in canoes and kayaks. a 16 or 17 foot canoe will paddle faster than a 13 footer. There are some good 14 canoes out there for fishing. If you got the bucks, consider a kevlar or kevlar composite boat. Both are half the weight of other materials, but won't hold up to harsh treatment. Wenonah and Bell are two good names for higher dollar canoes.