Do you have an explanation...

Discussion in 'General Conversation' started by AwShucks, May 4, 2006.

  1. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    How are rivers named as they are... I don't necessarily mean their name like the Red, or Snake, Mississippi, Tennessee, etc. It's like the Cimmaron river heads in Western Colorado...meanders through Colorado, Kansas, and Oklahoma to where it joins the Arkansas beneath lake Keystone. The Arkansas, on the otherhand, I believe heads in Northern Kansas and flows through Kansas, Oklahoma, and Arkansas where it joins the White. Okay for the basics, now I am getting close to the question. The Cimmaron is a longer river from its headwater to where it joins the Arkansas than the Arkansas... why isn't that joined river called the Cimmaron. The Arkansas is a longer river from it's headwaters to where it joins the White than the White is... why isn't that combination still referred to as the Arkansas instead of the White? Sometimes what we do has no rhyme or reasoning. It seems as though things get to be bass ackwards. You can tell I need to go fishing, Can't you? lol
     
  2. gargoil77

    gargoil77 New Member

    Messages:
    859
    State:
    Clarksville, Indiana
    Good question Lawrence. I always wondered why myself. Here in Indiana we have Blue river. Everytime I've seen it it was either brown or green. so I always wondered why it's called Blue River.
     

  3. Cattledogz

    Cattledogz Active Member

    Messages:
    1,374
    State:
    NC
    That is kind of like "Why do we park on driveways and drive on parkways?"....lol
     
  4. Cattledogz

    Cattledogz Active Member

    Messages:
    1,374
    State:
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    It may have actually been more of a blue water back before mankind polluted everything so badly. Just one of my 2 cent thoughts...lol
     
  5. Tulcat

    Tulcat New Member

    How about where the Neosho River and Spring River meets (NE OK), then it becomes the Grand River? Where did the Neosho River go?

    As far as why the shorter river sometimes retains the name after merging with a larger river could be that the lower part of the river was what was discovered and named before it was extensively explored upstream where it merges.
     
  6. IL Hunter

    IL Hunter New Member

    Messages:
    1,574
    State:
    Normal, IL
    This is me going out on a limb, but I actually learned something in college. In a geology class I learned rivers are classified by a number. They start as a 1 and when two levle one streams come together they form a level 2. When two 2's come together they become a three and so on. Now I don't know much about the bodies of water that were mentioned, but it might be that that rivers that carry the name are of as higher level than the one that entered it even though it had a longer distance of headwater.

    Then again there might not be any method to it.
     
  7. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    whoops....numbers equals math...math equals things I don't like getting into. Like why did the regents say for a person with a degree in Computer Science, you had to take Calculus...what a waste. Anyhow, one thing I have noticed about the rivers I mentioned is that each one whose name is retained has its mouth futher south than the one who lost its identity. The White is futher south than the Arkansas, the Arksansas is futher south than the Cimmaron. The Mississippi is futher south than anything which flows into it...Could this be a result of those dadgummed French trappers. One more thing to blame on the French lol
     
  8. IL Hunter

    IL Hunter New Member

    Messages:
    1,574
    State:
    Normal, IL
    Haha...Who needs geology when we can just blame the French instead.
     
  9. JAinSC

    JAinSC Active Member

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    1,514
    State:
    South Carolina
    I think you may have something there. The rivers were probably explored from the mouth headed upstream - thus the lower mouth determining the name.

    Where I grew up there was the Big River - little creek through a swamp. At least the Wood River flows through the woods.
     
  10. griz

    griz Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,744
    State:
    Murray Ky.
    I can't help with why they are named, but I can help with where the Arkansas River starts at. The Arkansas River starts above Leadville Colorado. At 1450 miles long the Arkansas River is the 4th longest river in the U.S.
     
  11. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    Your right, Griz. Don't know why I didn't remember that. I looked it up one time. Guess I must have slept too hard too many times. lol
     
  12. dinkbuster1

    dinkbuster1 New Member

    Messages:
    2,272
    State:
    Ohio
    here in my area of ohio we have 4 small rivers, the stillwater, the mad, great miami, and little miami. i seem to remember being told how they were named, but cant remember who or where i heard or read it. think it might have been my great grandmother. anyways, the great miami is the largest and supposedly was first just called the miami, named after an indian tribe that was in the area when the white man came and started settling. it was later changed to "great" miami because of another smaller river in the area being called "miami". hench little, and great miami. the mad river was given its name because it used to be a raging MAD river, its just a trickle now compared to ive seen from just 50 years ago. lots of drinking water is sucked from this river nowdays along its course along with a reservoir holding back lots of water. stillwater was apparently given its name because someone compared it to the Mad and it was much more "still" and slower=stillwater. like i said, i cannot remember where i learned this so i may be wrong.