Do catfish tournys do harm to the fish.

Discussion in 'LOCAL OHIO TALK' started by flathunter, Mar 30, 2009.

  1. flathunter

    flathunter New Member

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    Ohio
    First off I am not against tournys, they are not my cup of tea, but to each his own.

    I was just wondering how many catfish do you think will die even tho they are brought to the scales alive?

    And how much effect it has when you bring fish from all over the river sometimes many miles to turn them all lose in one spot after the weighing?

    Should the fish be transported back to the areas they were caught, instead of dumping them all in the water at the boat ramp?

    Agian, I am not aginst them..just wondering if the stress would kill the fish down the road,
     
  2. RiverKing

    RiverKing New Member

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    2,232
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    Yellow Spr
    Now Im not sure about how it effects the fish as far as letting them go all in one spot, never really thought about that aspect of it, but I can tell you that i go to great lengths to keep my fish healty and in good shape. I have a 70 gallon live well in my boat, and a 40 gallon livewell in my boat, and i have never had a fish even come close to dying, except a 2 lb flathead, and thats cause he literally inhaled my hook. But honestly most of the time its a struggle to get my fish out of the livewell because they are in such good shape and lively, alot of times they seem more frisky after being in the livewell than they are when i first catch them. But I check on them about every hour, I treat the water, and my livewell recircalates the water non stop the whole time they are in there. In my whole time fishing tournys, and lots of fish caught and weighed, I have only lost 1 flathead. He wasnt dead yet, but he would have died, so I cleaned him and ate him, but like I said it was cause he swallowed the hook. Now if your throwing your fish on a stringer and driving all over the lake/river with the fish laying in the bottom of the boat, or the fish looses the slime that is on them, they gonna die.
     

  3. flathunter

    flathunter New Member

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    Great post Matt, I am sure most like you go to great lenghts to make sure the fish are healthy.

    I have wonderd alot if the fish make there way back to the original habitat, or if they set up residence near the release points.
     
  4. RiverKing

    RiverKing New Member

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    2,232
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    I think most of the guys that fish tournys on a regular basis take adequate measures to make sure they have a sufficient livewell, I do still see the weekend warrior come out to the tourny with a stringer and it drives me nuts. Now as far as letting the fish go at the ramp, I would assume it would be the same as stocking a lake with Bluecats or something, they would go find a nice under water catfish appartment with lots of cover. I dont think they stay at the release point long before they are on the move to get back to their prefered habitat.
     
  5. Pip

    Pip New Member

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    1,670
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    pa
    Interesting thread.

    I've only fish smaller tourney's, haven't done any big ones yet. But I think to an extent there is and will be some mortality. Could be before the fish ever gets to the weigh-in's. I've seen some that never swil off from after the weigh-in's. i've even seen some cats, and bass floating belly up a couple hours after the weigh-in's are over.

    I think a couple things come into play. how stressed what the fish from the fight? Was the proper type of livewell used?.... areation, means to remove the ammonia, temperature shock, to name a few. i've seen people use anything from a cooler, to a decoy bag, to a screened chicken wire cage. Some methods are better then others. educating on how to take care of ones catch is important.

    It is important to aerate the water, but being able to keep the ammonia levels to an exceptable level is even more important. Summer time heat can be very hard on a cat. Being able to reduce the water temp but not so much to cause shock can be a full time job.

    Hopefully Steve(Akwa-Lung1) will chime in here. He has a good system for taking care of these fish after the catch. I've also learned a good bit from him and others.
     
  6. Blacky

    Blacky New Member

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    10,351
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    Philadelphia, P
    Tournament fisherman have no concept in Delayed or Release Mortality. Just because a fish swims off on it's own doesn't mean it not gonna swim to the bottom of the river or some kind of structure and die!

    Imagine getting a hook yanked through your mouth, getting dragged up out of the depths of the river, thrown into a livewell for God know how many hours, and then being released after a stressful day contained in a metal box.:wink:

    Many, many fish die in tournaments. Why do you think bass fishing sucks all across the country?:cool2:
     
  7. kenlaw76

    kenlaw76 New Member

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    2,323
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    S.E. Pa.
    Cause everyone has been using them for bait.:roll_eyes: I don't think that too many of them die if they were handled properly and the water was maintained properly I don't think they would get stressed out that much. Shoot, if you have an Aqualung the water in the livewell is prob. cleaner than the water you caught the fish in. It would be like putting someone in a closet for a half of a day. I don't think that would kill someone.
     
  8. tbull

    tbull New Member

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    3,318
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    SW Ohio
    Cool thread....

    I agree with Matt in the fact that it all goes in to what you put in it. I build my livewell's just like I build my bait tanks. And have had great success with live shad. Thats pretty much how I rate my newest creations...lol:smile2: But bottom line is if I know for a fact I am running the same set up that keeps shad alive almost 99.9% of the time, for up to 12 hours at a time, I am pretty confident that it will keep catfish alive no problem. But like the above poster stated, there is always going to be some mortality involved. I mean think about it, I know I have caught fish, brought them in the boat just to take a picture, put them back in the water and they go belly up for some unknown reason. There isn't to much we can do about the stress. All we can do is do everything possible to keep the fish alive, and healthy to be caught another day.:wink:
     
  9. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

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  10. jason berry

    jason berry New Member

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    Evansville
    People need to go to Cabelas tournaments and see how the real tourney catfisherman take care of there catches. These guys are always bringing cats in over 60# that are very lively and I wouldnt say for a minute there going to die.

    These guys sometimes have to wait a while just to get the cats out of these huge tanks because the cats are still ready for a fight. True tourney guys have the right set ups, you should check out these guys tanks. You got to remember these guys love to fish and know the importance of keeping there fish alive for the money and the sport. If the fish dies they dont get paid and they will never be able to catch that fish again. Tourney guys know the importance of keeping the big ones alive.
     
  11. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

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    6,894
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    You are exactly right... But, some will say.... How you know they didn't die later? My response is how do you know any fish didn't die later? Yes, fish kept longer have a better chance of it, but if that were the case always. Then fish would never be able to be transported etc. And that would be a known fact by now!:wink: rollo
     
  12. ranman92

    ranman92 New Member

    Messages:
    69
    State:
    OHIO
    In two years of fishing in tournament we have had 2 fish die out of about 100 fish or so and they were both little ones. And as soon as we put them in the livewell after catching them we could tell they were in trouble. Also call me stupid but when we are having troublw with a fish we usually put them on the stringer by themselves and put them in the lake and they revive very quickly. From my experience the fish on a stringer all by itself does very well never ever lost 1 that way. But the two that did die we were pissed we are in no way trying to kill any fish.
     
  13. smokey869

    smokey869 New Member

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    966
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    frederickt
    i too fish quite a few tounaments and have never had a fish die on me, during the tourneys we keep a floating live well in the water fished and any time moving over trolling motor speed the well is put in boat with 30 gallons of water and 2 110volt areators running and are put back into the water as soon as we stop, the only exception was the flat in my avatar pic, he wouldnt fit in the live well, he was in the lake on a string for approx 8 hours, only brought out once when we were docking and was very healthy when released, we moved the boat with trolling motor(except when he was dragging us around) but it all depends on how the fish are taken care of and also how they are hooked when caught, if they swallow a hook into the gills it doent matter what you do, that is the only time i fillet one :wink:
     
  14. kenlaw76

    kenlaw76 New Member

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    2,323
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    S.E. Pa.
    Shoot Rollo, maybe you should wright up an artical about it.
     
  15. Still_Waters...

    Still_Waters... New Member

    Messages:
    171
    State:
    Ohio
    In my experience the only fish harder to kill then a catfish is a carp, I remember being little and having them in a cooler full of ice over night to find them the next morning FROZEN, only for them to thaw out later and be just as lively as before, I'm pretty confident that with as much care that most of these guys take to keep their fish alive they stay alive, and if they die after that much babying, then they were living on borrowed time to begin with, and while it's not a good thing to see a fish floating around, you should only want the ones that are hardy to be breeding, and comparing these guys to bass (bait) fishermen is just wrong, we aren't the ones going around making hybrid strains of fish just so what we go after can have a little bit of fight to it, or going in for a long weekend tourney with a field of 50 teams fighting over the handful of fish that are actually in there.

    As for the second part of the question it seems like most catfish are somewhat migratory in nature, so I couldn't realistically see them staying by the ramp for long if at all, I mean it just seems natural that they would slip back into their routine after they calm down and sit on the river bottom for a while.

    Just my thoughts.
     
  16. CatHunter24

    CatHunter24 New Member

    Messages:
    715
    State:
    Dayton, Ohio
    I agree, I almost always practice CPR but the one time i planned to eat a few smaller channel cats I froze them in a cooler and when i took them out after getting back to fillet they thawed out and were lively as ever. I would think if the precautions are taken with the livewell technology we have that fish would have no problem surviving those 6-8 hrs in a livewell. As for the question about them leaving the boat ramp, i kind of have wondered the same thing, but I believe they probably just continue on and migrate to cover and areas once they settle down as well.
     
  17. AwShucks

    AwShucks New Member

    Messages:
    4,532
    State:
    Guthrie, Oklaho
    To my knowledge, tournament fishermen know the worth of the fish they catch and do what they can to keep these fish alive. Now, if you want to know a culprit far as large catfish go, it is the occasional rod and reel fisherman, the noodler, the jugger, limb liner and/or trotliner that generally kills the big fish. And they don't, for the most part, kill the fish because they are ignorant, but because they are looking to fill a freezer or because their ego gets involved in the fishing process. Nope, can't blame tournament fishermen for the dead fish...and the ones those mentioned culprits catch don't even get the chance to swim off.
     
  18. H2O Mellon

    H2O Mellon New Member

    Messages:
    3,012
    State:
    Ohio
    You need to start your post with, "In my opinon" because you've written it in "Matter of Fact" form and your completely mistaken. Your argument is barely valid becasue the same thing be said about every C&R or C-P-R'd fish.

    I can tell that you've never seen catfish tourney guys before weigh ins or if you have then you've only seen the worst of them. Most of us spend hundreds of dollars on tanks & filterarion systems in order for our fish to be realsed in not just as good as shape but BETTER shape than a normal catch and release fish.
     
  19. catfishrollo

    catfishrollo New Member

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    6,894
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    Ohio
    Thanks, I felt slapped in the face as well....rollo
     
  20. catfishscotty

    catfishscotty Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    4,388
    State:
    mo
    some of this really cracks me up

    catfish are tuff and i agree some ive had in a livewell are more frisky then when ya caught them ..

    if some of ya think that they are that fragile and presciuos why even slam a hook in a cats jaw then lol

    if ya have ever noodled or hand fish for cats when they are on the nest spawning and see how beat up and chewed up they get from fighting on the nest ya would see how tuff they really are .

    shoot ive had fish out of the water for 30 mminutes or so and they still will swim off . and the cove where i have released may i never seen or anybody tell me they seen dead ones floating around and the cove im talking about is drake harbor where hundreds of boats are launched .