Dipbasket

Discussion in 'Shad Talk' started by tncatfishing, Dec 9, 2005.

  1. tncatfishing

    tncatfishing New Member

    Messages:
    916
    State:
    clk. tn
    How many of yall have built your own dipbasket for shad. I have made a couple different ones. The most recent one wound up being not wide enough for the other purpose of a dipbasket, scooping up a big cat at the wall at the steam plant. So I am going to build another. They sell em but they can get expensive, so I just make my own, I make my own rod holders for the rails to, but they are nothing special.
     
  2. Nobody Special

    Nobody Special New Member

    Messages:
    614
    State:
    TN
    Those good for nothing overpaid TVA employees should take a welder out there and weld some pieces of pipe at an angle along the top rail at the wall for people to put their rods in.
     

  3. tncatfishing

    tncatfishing New Member

    Messages:
    916
    State:
    clk. tn
    Now grumpy that would take forthought and we know how much of that they have, I mean they can't even fix the darn lights out their. And I even called the security part at Tva and let them know about it , it is a safety hazard and several weeks later the lights still don't work. It ia hard for me to believe they can't afford to replace the bulbs, go figure.
     
  4. TOPS

    TOPS New Member

    Messages:
    4,099
    State:
    Cabot,Arkansas
    Send some pictures of the items you are referring to. I sure would like to get some ideas!
     
  5. tncatfishing

    tncatfishing New Member

    Messages:
    916
    State:
    clk. tn
    Unfortuanately at present time I don't have a way to post picks on the site, sorry about that but someone else probably has a diagram. Their shaped like a v . You just drop it down to the water next to the wall, and basicaly just pull up when the shad swim above it. And they come in handy when yoyu get a big fish on the wall.
     
  6. Whistler

    Whistler Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,084
    State:
    TN
    I made one. Big one too. LOL Made ir from some old aluminum angles and hardware cloth. Works great at the steamplant then they're running.
     
  7. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    Top, I think that they are talking about something that kind of resembles a mineature stokes litter, made from hardware cloth fastened to some metal rails. They work well dropped down from the top of a concrete wall. At Dardanelle, I mostly use a shad dip net. You can buy the ones that are made from wire mesh, like a fish basket; they even collapse like a wire mesh fish basket. But, they are expensive; something over $30 as I remember from pricing one a couple of years ago. I bought one back in the eighties, and the wire mesh finally rusted away. I had long since replaced the wooden handle with a piece of metal tubing--the same stuff that runs along the top of a chain link fence. So, I got some 1/4" hardware cloth, and made a new basket on the old rim. It doesn't collapse, of course, but it works great. You can stand on the bottom of the sloping part of the concrete wall, where it runs into the water, and dip all the shad you'd ever want, as long as the #1 turbine is running.
     
  8. Jamey

    Jamey New Member

    Messages:
    138
    State:
    Pegram, Tennessee
    I haven't been here since August (busy semester at ETSU), but this has come up before. Although I haven't done any catting since summer, I have acquired a digital camera in the meantime. Hopefully, these images will attach properly..

    The first image is my first attempt at constructing a shad-basket. It's a "V-style" basket, as mentioned by jerry and others. Dragging this thing up and down the steps at Cheatham Dam a few times prompted me to build the collapsible type described below. Besides being unwieldy, the corners are prone to catch on overhanging rocks on the way up. This can be especially problematic when hoisting up large, pissed-off blues or stripers. You'll notice I used PVC and plastic draw-ties, which helped keep things lightweight, but decreased sturdiness. Some of the locals with welding equipment and skills build some pretty stout versions of this basket.

    The second two images are of my favorite shad basket. It's collapsible, and thus, portable. I constructed it from an extra-large fish basket (~16$ @ Ba$$Pro). The rim is a strip of steel used in cyclone fencing, bent into a circle the same diameter of the basket, and fastened together with three machine screws. I drilled three more holes around the rim, at an equal distance apart, for the S-hooks/rope. The basket is attached to the rim via plastic draw-ties. The egg sinkers wired to the bottom ensure the basket opens immediately upon hitting the water. This is by far my favorite basket, and I've turned down many an offer to buy it. If the shad are running thick, I can scoop up ~1/2 a bucket at a time. So far, I've landed fish up to thirty pounds with this rig.



    Hope this helps!

    -J
     

    Attached Files:

  9. Whistler

    Whistler Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,084
    State:
    TN
    Mine looks like Jamey's first one only made with a bunch of aluminum angles I had in the garage. I have one made with PVC too, but it's a bit too bouyant sometimes. Works great at the steamplant on the catwalk wall. Can fill a 5 gallon bucket sometimes with one try.
     
  10. blkhawkdwn

    blkhawkdwn New Member

    Messages:
    169
    State:
    Clarksville, Tennessee
    I'm new to the BOC and I met Deerhunter01 Today down at the steamplant.

    i have been in the Tennessee area for 6 yrs now. have been fishing the steamplant for the same length of time. other than being in Iraq in 2003. I have seen several people use these types of baskets but i'm more into the casting net. though i have seen a lot of people that don't know how to use the nets lose them in the rocks I'm desent with casting and kinda know the area and know not to let it hit the bottom. the shad are in thick and two cast can fill a 34 gallon cooler.
     
  11. Jamey

    Jamey New Member

    Messages:
    138
    State:
    Pegram, Tennessee
    i like castnets too, especially for sheer volume. but at cheatham dam, it means walking down the handrail to the slick rocks at the water's edge. over the summer, a man and his child drowned at that very spot. I've slipped there myself, and it's pretty unnerving, especially with no lifejacket. sometimes though, it's the only way to catch bait, so I usually bring a basket and a net. also, with no basket, you're forced to fight large fish all the way down the handrail, past other fishermen, rods, and reels, to the rocks mentioned above. they really make life much easier at a lot of dams!
     
  12. james

    james New Member

    Messages:
    747
    State:
    Blue Ridge texa
    ive seen a guy at the spillway here use a net like those seen it in action one time. he had a huge flathead on, the current was so strong it was whiping the net around and couldnt get it to the fish and ended up loseing the fish. do yall have the same problem with them? do seem like one would make it easy instead off haveing to play the fish out and pull him onto the slab thats down below then set my pole down and walk around the wall and climb down the slippery rocks then climb back up.
     
  13. Jamey

    Jamey New Member

    Messages:
    138
    State:
    Pegram, Tennessee
    It's not so bad, but it can be tricky if they have all three generators running. It just takes some practice. After a while, you get better at dropping the basket at the appropriate point "upstream" of your fish. It's all about timing.
     
  14. tncatfishing

    tncatfishing New Member

    Messages:
    916
    State:
    clk. tn
    Blkhawkdown , right now the shad are easy to catch cause they are bunching up in the warm water, in the summer time they can be hard to find and easier to catch with a drop basket against the wall. Jamey I did not know two people drowned their over the summer, what a tragedy. That is why my 4 year old will not go with me down their. I have a cast net and a drop basket. The v shaped drop basket is the best, putting a license plate on one side will keep it against the wall. Maybe I will see yall their I m usualy their saturday mornings.
     
  15. blkhawkdwn

    blkhawkdwn New Member

    Messages:
    169
    State:
    Clarksville, Tennessee
    yea TN during the summer it is kinda hard to get them if you don't know where to cast for them I usually cast up against the wall and get them or i would go down next to the barges and cast there. i see that they have sectioned off a part near the barges on the opposite side from the parking that spot where they put the fence was a great :006: spot :cursing: :cry-big: but one can't complain to much. there is also the point of getting people to clean up after themselves.

    i didn't hear about anyone drowning at the dam but i did hear about the guy that was drunk and feel in at the plant I'm sorry to hear that there was a father and son that drowned
     
  16. Jamey

    Jamey New Member

    Messages:
    138
    State:
    Pegram, Tennessee
    Yeah, the father and son incident happened a few months ago, when the water was much warmer than the current 40 degrees. I wouldn't want to fall in now for sure. Here's a link to the thread:

    http://www.catfish1.com/forums/showthread.php?t=527

    tncat, the license plate sounds like a great idea. I guess it acts as a rudder against the current, right?

    btw, while we're on the subject of cheatham dam, does anyone do any good there during the winter? I was thinking about hitting it up before i have to go back to school in a week. I stopped by to check it out today, and the water looked pretty low. I've heard of some sauger action going on there, but never tried winters at cheatham. Oddly enough, i didn't see any bankfishermen there, but there were three boats bunched up in the corner in the spot where I usually bank fish :cursing: .