Deep V

Discussion in 'Boat Tips' started by howards, Jun 2, 2006.

  1. howards

    howards New Member

    Messages:
    113
    State:
    IL.
    I found a deep v boat in a used dealer back lot...18x5ft with a high front end..it is set up for a short shart motor...it has to be a old boat and he said it had been used on Lake Mic....does someone know about this kind of boat..He want $600 for it.
     
  2. BAM

    BAM New Member

    Messages:
    827
    State:
    Tennessee
    What is the Brand name ?
     

  3. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    It's 18' long and only 5' wide? Is that the floor, or the actual beam? If it's the actual beam (widest part) of the boat, it sounds more like a canoe than a fishing boat. Of course, once your speed drops so that the boat isn't up on plane any more, a narrow boat has the advantage as far as speed and economy goes. Seriously, a 20' boat with less than an 8' beam is narrow; an 18' boat with less than 6 1/2' - 7' is narrow. The narrower the boat, the more it will roll, the less it will carry, and the more horsepower it will take to keep on plane. If it's a deep V, it will handle rough water much better, but will roll more than a more flatbottomed boat, and will take more horsepower to keep up on plane.
     
  4. peewee williams

    peewee williams New Member

    Messages:
    3,111
    State:
    Pembroke,Georgia
    Just my opinion.Check out that transom hight carefully.It may be for a long shaft motor to get the prop.below the hull.They tend to look like a transom for a short shaft motor.A deep V that carries the V all of the way to the stern will leave your outboard motors power head way lower,or closer to the water than a modified V or flat bottom.This can be detrimental at anchor or at slow speed in rough water.Also a deep V is not as stable at rest as a flatter hull form.They usually take more horse power to push them the same speeds.It will draw more water than most hull forms.It does let you go faster in rougher water up to a point.If it gets rough enough,you have to slow down.There ain;t no perfect boat or hull form for everything.I did a lot of heavy research on them in the 80s as I was strongly considering buying one.I think that the higher the transom,the better on a rough water boat.Your outboard runs on air,not water.There is even a trade off there.The farther a prop is in the water,the less likely for it to come out of the water as you break over a wave.This is why my 28 in.shaft (if I remember right) 8 horse with the long sailboat shaft and foot did better in rough water than my 20 inch 40 hp.primary outboard.This was a common problem when ocean fishing in the winter for black fish.peewee-williams
     
  5. howards

    howards New Member

    Messages:
    113
    State:
    IL.
    The floor was at lest 5 or 6 feet,and I think it was for a short shift motor.