Decent Casting Net

Discussion in 'NORTH CAROLINA LAKES / RESERVOIRS' started by holliswood, Dec 13, 2009.

  1. holliswood

    holliswood Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,803
    State:
    King, NC
    Looking for a good casting net. Any suggestions?
     
  2. countryboy79

    countryboy79 New Member

    Messages:
    358
    State:
    nc
    I use a 7ft net that i buy from a man at the flea market in rockingham nc. its brand new 7ft net for $30.00 can't beat that. If you have never use one, you mite wanna start off with a smaller one ,,, 5ft or 6ft
     

  3. CatHunter24

    CatHunter24 New Member

    Messages:
    715
    State:
    Dayton, Ohio
    I get the frabril Walmart Nets....its like 31.00 for a 5 ft net. A little less for a 3.5, but i wouldn't get less than a 5 footer. Good mono nets for the price....and people usually tear nets up pretty frequently so I am not a big advocate of spending a ton on them.
     
  4. holliswood

    holliswood Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,803
    State:
    King, NC
    Thanks for the input. I've been down in that area twice in the past two years to catch the Carolina 500 and the 300 this year. Tony Stewart was there in 2008 to wave the green flag. Kevin Harvick did the honors this year. I've never casted a net before so I'll definately go with a small one.
     
  5. holliswood

    holliswood Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,803
    State:
    King, NC
    Thanks! Thats in my price range. Haven't casted before so I'm probably gonna mess it up. Now I gotta figure where the shad is :big_smile:.
     
  6. katsandsuds

    katsandsuds New Member

    Messages:
    157
    State:
    North Caro
    The two big things about cast nets are the mesh size and weight. I perfer the 3/8" mesh, some people use 1/2". The Weight is very critical. In the winter when the shad are deeper, using less then 1.5lb/ft makes catching shad much harder for me. It just doesn't sink fast enough and stay open long enough. The more weight, the higher the cost though. I use a 7' 1.5lb/ft most of the time. When I am in a new area or close to docks, places I expect to get hung up, I use a smaller 5', 3/4lb/ft walmart special. Sports Authority has the best prices I know in the Greensboro area. Hwy 49 sporting goods has a good selection and reasonable prices down by Badin.

    If you have never thrown a net, smaller is easier to get started, but the bigger the net, the more area you can cover and quicker it is to catch bait. Practice in the yard, but understand it will be different on the boat, boat rocking, wet deck, seats and gear in the way, net catching on rod holders, etc. It is not hard, but takes some practice. Also, soak the net in fabric softner overnight when you first get it. This will help make it more flexible and easier to spread out. One last thing, expect to lose your net on any cast. It is going to get hung up and ripped up if you use it, that is just part of it. I always have 2 nets on the boat, and they both have been repaired several times.
     
  7. wtjordan84

    wtjordan84 New Member

    Messages:
    656
    State:
    NC
    I totally agree with what everyone else has said....practicing in the yard saves you alot of time, because if you try to learn it throwing it off of the boat youll probably just end up cold, wet and frustrated (speaking from experience, haha.)
    My personal preference is to throw the net in deeper water when possible, because youre less likely to get hung up. And besides, this time of year I seem to find most balls of shad out in a little bit deeper water anyways. In the summer and fall when the shad are breaking the top of the water its usually pretty easy to throw it right on them, but this time of year I look for them on the depth finder, then try to throw it over them and let it float down on top of them. It is sort of hit or miss so dont get discouraged if you dont catch any on the first few throws. Alot of times ill throw it ten times and only catch a few....but when the shad are bunched up and you hit the right spot, youll fill up your bait bucket in one throw. As for net size, I would say start with a 5 or 6 footer. I use the Frabill net from walmart as well, but i admit it would be nice if they had a little more weight. Of course you can always add your own weight. Ive been through several cast nets, and I always save the old weights off of them...you can add it to another net if you want, or you can melt down the lead and make your own sinkers.
    As for where to throw, I always have good luck throwing around bridge pilings. Just be careful because alot of times there are logjams to get hung on...or sometimes the footer for the piling extends out several feet beyond the piling itself. Experiment with how far you let the net sink as well....if youre marking the shad at 15 feet, try to pull hard and close the net when you think its in that range....sometimes if you let the net sink for too long the shad will escape before you ever pull it closed.
    Sorry for the essay! I know you didnt ask for all this crap, but hopefully it helps. And of course this is all just my personal rant about this stuff, so take it for what its worth and feel free to add....im curious about other peoples methods for netting bait, because i only learned to throw the cast net this last spring. Good luck!
     
  8. Bill in SC

    Bill in SC New Member

    Messages:
    4,451
    State:
    South Caro
  9. wabah58

    wabah58 New Member

    Messages:
    631
    State:
    Missouri
    WOW! That is the cheapest I've ever saw. Thats a great bookmark there.
     
  10. BigBird

    BigBird New Member

    Messages:
    2,104
    State:
    Charlotte, NC
    Bill are those the buys that have the small tackleshop with the three tractor trailers for storage beside on the 34 hwy
     
  11. katman#1

    katman#1 New Member

    Messages:
    1,209
    State:
    South Carolina
    no lindsey thats a&b outfitters c&j sports is on a side road off of 34