dead fish

Discussion in 'LOCAL OHIO TALK' started by catfishbrett, Jul 18, 2008.

  1. catfishbrett

    catfishbrett New Member

    Messages:
    181
    State:
    Steubenville,Ohio
    i was just reading a post on here about dead flatheads in shallow water,it made me remember that about 5 or so years ago you couldn't fish anywhere along the ohio because of the dead carp. i have never seen so many dead fish in so many area's it seemed for every 25ft of shore there were atleast 5 dead carp. also every other fish you seem to catch had these red sores on them. i went up to lake Erie that year for vacation and all there beaches were loaded with dead channel cats and freshwater drum.

    in my area (jefferson county) the fisherman and home owners next to the river and creeks raised a bunch of h#!! over the dead fish and the nasty smell of it.our local news investagated the story and about a week later broadcasted a story saying that because of a heat wave the carp spawning in the shallows didn't get enough oxygen to stay alive.but this lasted all year not just the carp's spawning season.

    does anyone else remember this? and did this happen in other rivers besides the ohio? fishing for any type of fish that year was really hard you just didn't catch that many.
     
  2. brother hilljack

    brother hilljack New Member

    Messages:
    7,305
    State:
    Shelbyville, TN
    I don't remember when this happened. Let us know more if you find the details
     

  3. tbull

    tbull New Member

    Messages:
    3,318
    State:
    SW Ohio
    I remeber a while back I was at a different large public lake, and fish had similar sores on them. The owner told me it was from fresh water eels??? Had never heard of that before, he wasnt even sure how they had gotten there. Left really big red sores on the fish.
     
  4. RetiredToFish

    RetiredToFish New Member

    Messages:
    1,186
    State:
    Newark, Ohio
    Travis what he would have been talking about are Lamprey eels .... But I have never heard of any of them outside of Lake Erie ...They are another invasive species. Garry-
     
  5. RetiredToFish

    RetiredToFish New Member

    Messages:
    1,186
    State:
    Newark, Ohio

    Brett .... When I was a conservation Officer we saw this most every year somewhere throughout the state. The cause generally is from oxygen starved fish. (Unless an industrial contaminate is dumped into the water). What happens is as the water level drops, it heats up from the sun, this takes oxygen from the water. Then this becomes the prime condition for algea to bloom which then suck twice as much oxygen from the water. The fish littlerally suffocate. Many times the sores you see on the fish come from a fish in a weaken condition injuring themselves and since they have a weaken immune system get an infection at that point. Although there are other reasons for fish kills this is the most common. It is usually less prevalent in rivers and streams than it is in ponds and lakes, unless some outside contaminate is added to the cause. Garry-
     
  6. JCONWAY

    JCONWAY New Member

    Messages:
    31
    State:
    Kansas
    I had the same thing happen in Kansas. Two years ago my buddy and me went bow fishing for carp and gar North of Perry lake on the Delaware river. It was the hottest time of the year, we saw hundreds of carp. The only thing was we didn't see a live one all day. The river bank was lined with dead carp. The river channel if fairly deep, so I don't know?


    In the past two weeks we have seen allot of dead cats washing up on the bank at Perry. Only when the wind blows from the direction of the spots where guys are chumming. I talked to a guy at the boat ramp and he said some guys were not soaking the beans first, they were just dumping hard beans over the side of the boat. I guess this makes sense. If they fill up on hard beans and then the beans swell inside of them it could kill them:embarassed::embarassed::embarassed:
     
  7. RetiredToFish

    RetiredToFish New Member

    Messages:
    1,186
    State:
    Newark, Ohio
    Jeremy .... I am no authority on beans ... but I would almost bet if you would get in a boat and back track to where the fish kill's origin is you will find some kind of polutant or an algea bloom. If you could test the oxygen in the water in that area it is probably well below what is considered sustanible for fish to live. These are usually shallow areas that carp and cats move up into to feed. Also there are times when in shallow areas the water gets too warm, the bottom heats up causing small amounts of methane gas to escape from below the setiment ... you see this all of the time with bubbles coming up from the bottom in shallow areas.

    But I would just about bet ... it isn't the beans causing the kill .... if you still think it is ... then I suggest you call your game and fish officers and report it and the people that doing it. I am sure there are laws about causing fish kills in your state.

    Garry-
     
  8. elizabuilt

    elizabuilt New Member

    Messages:
    63
    State:
    Norton, OH
    Hey Brett. We had a lake in our area have a bunch of fish die. It was a swimming lake and they quit the swimming to do tests, and said it was just low oxygen levels. The lake is called silvercreek near akron. I would also like to ask Garry How do you check oxygen levels? I put a pond in at my house last year. I have only lost one fish. I am just starting to get algae and aquatic growth. I have never treated it with anything. I really don't know if I should or what.
     
  9. SVTFisherman

    SVTFisherman New Member

    Messages:
    21
    State:
    Ohio - West Chester
    Hey Elizabuilt,

    I would highly recommend an aeration system that uses an air pump and some air diffusers at the bottom. Fountains are pretty, but they just don't add enough oxygen down deep. Plus if you run it all year you'll keep a hole from forming in the ice and allow air to come in. I am no expert at all on this.. but if you google aquatic ecosystems, give them a call and they will gladly help you.

    I may not have a pond in my back yard but at one time I had 70+ aquariums in my basement... so I know a little about oxygen levels :).
     
  10. RetiredToFish

    RetiredToFish New Member

    Messages:
    1,186
    State:
    Newark, Ohio
    Freddy ... the only way I know of to check dissolved oxygen in the water is with a meter made for that purpose. They run from around $400 to $600. http://www.milleranalytical.com/pH_Meters.htm

    How large is your pond and how deep? You can try contacting either the DNR or Agriculture extension agent in your county ... one of them should be able to give you some booklets or other information. They are probably going to want to know the size (acres) and depth and whether or not it is spring feed or stream feed or just run-off. I used have a lot of info pertaining to this problem, but got rid of it some time back. You might also talk to them about using some type of aquacide to control vegetation and algae growth, but there again they are going to want to what type of vegetation you are dealing with.

    Hope I have helped you a wee bit .......... Garry- :eek:oooh:
     
  11. hawk

    hawk New Member

    Messages:
    71
    State:
    kenton ohio
    I'm betting that its oxygen depletion. I know my wife's grand father just lost over 500 fish out of his 10 acre pond cause it turned over and the oxygen levels dropped severely. She said he lost so big cats that were in there . Guess lack of oxygen and over population can just about kill a pond.

    I knew it was gonna happen when the first time i fished there i was told its all catch and release .There are no fish to be taken from the pond . The fish were stunted cause of the amount in there.

    What is a decent amount of fish per acre. any help with this would be great .