Current and catfish location:

Discussion in 'MISSOURI RIVERS TALK' started by kat in the hat, Jul 31, 2007.

  1. kat in the hat

    kat in the hat New Member

    Messages:
    4,875
    State:
    Missouri
    I'm a tad green when it comes to big river fishing, but have been going a few times a year for the past couple of years. Seems to me like current plays a huge role in locating catfish of all species. During spawning times, I realize this may not be true, but most of the fish I've caught in the river have come from areas with the heaviest current. My question is...How does current dictate your fishing strategy? Even most of the flatheads I've caught have come from chutes of heavy current flowing between the notch in wing dikes, and nowhere near any noticable structure except maybe a few large rocks on the bottom. During spawn it seems like a good idea to try slack water near fallen timber, and large rock piles, but near heavy structure. Depth hasn't been as much of a factor as good strong current. Anybody else find this to be true, or have I just been lucky, and not really utilizing a particularly good situation? I'm not a pro, but feel like every trip to the river I learn the ins and outs of what works on the river. I'll set lines where I think it looks "fishy", and come up empty handed, but when I fish out in more open water where the water is flowing good, I have more "luck". What's the thoughts of the more seasoned fishermen on here? Here's a couple of pics that kinda illustrate some of the more productice areas. Not good pics, but gives you an idea of what I'm talking about.
     

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  2. TeamWhiskers

    TeamWhiskers New Member

    Messages:
    536
    State:
    Missouri
    It will really all depend upon the fish itself. The supply and demand of not only the catfish as with the bait fish will have an impact on each hole you fish. The more aggressive fish will hit first.. the ones that are actively feeding. You not only need to understand the catfish as you do the patterns and how the baitfish will react to certain water conditions being fast swift water or slack with back flows.
    Now it is a toss of the coin if you are going to hit a 5, 8, 10 then 25 pounder for example or could happen the other way around. As long as you keep catching bigger fish hang around for awhile. That is just the pattern of the hole. This will also depend on your bait and the size of your baits also. Use several types and sizes targeting them all.
    You are starting to get the idea and a 3-D mental image of how a river works and flows in certain situations. Experiment with putting a bobber on with different weights at different lengths of your drop line. Watch your bobber movement as the weight whips around in the current under it. Then try to get the mental image of what it looks like. Pull your anchor and then drift over it watching your fish finder to see if you were right and where the fish are. So you might not catch any fish.. But you learned about that situation as there will be other similar places on the river that you will be able to apply what you learned.
     

  3. Michael Jake

    Michael Jake New Member

    Messages:
    808
    State:
    Troy, Missouri
    Your observation about currant Matt is right on. I look for fast radical currant seams with plenty of ariation happening on the surface. Catfish and baitfish alike thrive in these conditions. Try to find what works like Vince suggested for fishing these conditions. I like to target right in the middle of fastest part of the seam. You’ll need a lot of weight to keep it there, all three catfish species feed here but blues will be the most commonly caught. Enjoy the river Matt, it’s an awesome place.