Cumberland River drift socks? need opinions

Discussion in 'TENNESSEE RIVERS TALK' started by Michael, Jun 2, 2007.

  1. Michael

    Michael New Member

    Messages:
    203
    State:
    Clarksville TN
    how do you know what a good size of drift sock is for a boat?
    i have a 18' 06" aluminum Monark that is a pretty heavy boat and I'm looking to buy a drift sock for bumping bottom for catfish and using it for sauger fishing in the winter.
    I live in clarksville tn and fish the Cumberland alot . so if you ever been on the Cumberland river below the dam you know its steady sometimes and not so steady current sometimes. any input form anyone?
     
  2. Clovis

    Clovis New Member

    Messages:
    165
    State:
    Paris Tennessee
    I don't know if a drift sock will work to counter the current. I think that they are mainly for when the wind is blowing you drop them in to catch water and stop it from blowing so fast. I would think if you were drifting with the current you wouldn't want a sock in the water as it would catch more water and speed the drift if anything.

    Maybe someone will correct me though.
     

  3. Angler2007

    Angler2007 New Member

    Messages:
    489
    State:
    Missouri
    I don't think a drift sock is going to do you any good in the current. I think you would be better off with a good trolling motor on the bow to control your drift. As far as I know drift socks are for controlling the drift when it is windy. I have one of Cabela's Extra large ones for my 20' Xpress and it works great on windy days.
     
  4. Whistler

    Whistler Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,084
    State:
    TN
    Michael,

    Get an old piece of logging chain and drag it along behind you. Or use your trolling motor to slow the drift in the current. Of course, if we don't get some rain soon, you won't have to worry about the current. LOL I haven't seen any current to speak of for 2 weeks. River is more of a lake right now.
     
  5. Clovis

    Clovis New Member

    Messages:
    165
    State:
    Paris Tennessee
    And if you are going to try to keep anything you catch alive you better have some way of keeping it on the bottom. Surface temps were running from 86 to 91 degrees last weekend.
     
  6. Michael

    Michael New Member

    Messages:
    203
    State:
    Clarksville TN
    yeah in the summer time i pull out my bottles out of the freezer and put them in a cooler full of ice so the stay froze and I'll drop a frozen bottle in about every hr in the live well so the water temp stays nice and cool. and i put my live well on recirculate so I'm not pumping in the hot water. and by freezing the bottles it doesn't put any chlorine in the water that can kill the fish like ice can. but i only do that when I'm fishing tournaments in the summer
     
  7. mwallace61

    mwallace61 New Member

    Messages:
    42
    State:
    Huntsville,Alabama
    Michael,

    Whistler nailed it. Thanks Whistler!

    I didn't have any heavy log chain, but I did have some 5/16" chain. I cut three three foot lengths of it and attached it to some anchor rope. If the current is heavy, I'll use all three, lighter I'll take one or two pieces off.

    Mike
     
  8. Wade Patton

    Wade Patton New Member

    Messages:
    13
    State:
    Woodbury, TN
    While not as cheap or energy efficient as dragging a chain. The coolest setup I've EVER seen for fishing boat control was dual stern-mount trolling motors. The boat I saw had dual motors on the trim tabs--flats boat in FL.

    But you'll never drain the battery on a chain.

    I'll have a flats boat in TN someday.

    Oh, and now I have a good use for the 1/2 inch chain I've been kicking around for a few years.

    And what they said--drift sock counters wind, not current.