Creeks for bluegill?

Discussion in 'Bluegill Fishing' started by JMarrs328, May 12, 2006.

  1. JMarrs328

    JMarrs328 New Member

    Messages:
    471
    State:
    York/Harrisburg, PA
    I've heard that one of the best places to catch bluegill is in the tributaries to a large river. I've only ever seen a couple of gills/sunnies in the creek that I fish for smallies, about 1/2 mile upstream from the river. If they're in there, then where should i fish for them? In the rapid areas, real slow areas, around current breaks? What types of baits consistently produce in areas like this? What kind of rig should I use?
     
  2. JMarrs328

    JMarrs328 New Member

    Messages:
    471
    State:
    York/Harrisburg, PA
    I know that this is a lot of questions, but the only places that I have caught gills are lakes and farm ponds. I did catch a few in the river, but only because I looked in, saw a few, and I needed some more bait/fillets!!:roll_eyes: Thanks in advance for the help!!!
     

  3. chubbahead

    chubbahead Member

    Messages:
    332
    State:
    Ohio
    In rocks, around cover, under tree roots. Now that I write that, I realize bluegill are a lot like flats, always around cover. Drop a wax worm right between the cracks of the rocks, you will see them grab it and run right back under the rock.
     
  4. treddinwater

    treddinwater Active Member

    Messages:
    1,123
    State:
    Indianapolis, Indiana
    One of the creeks I fish holds some decent gills in it, I usually catch a lot drifting small worms about 10" under a bobber in slow current around stumps and logs.
     
  5. JMarrs328

    JMarrs328 New Member

    Messages:
    471
    State:
    York/Harrisburg, PA
    What size hooks do you guys usually use for this?
     
  6. jtrew

    jtrew New Member

    Messages:
    4,404
    State:
    Little Rock, AR
    I'm usually fishing for bait, so I like a #10 or #12 long shanked wire hook. IMO, maggots are the best bait for bream, but waxworms & mealworms are very good too. But lately, I've been mostly using the little 'crappie bites' that look like tiny marshmallows, and the imitation maggots. They don't work quite as well as real maggots, but maggots are a pain to grow and keep alive; having a bait that you can simply keep in your tacklebox is a big advantage.
     
  7. AllenM

    AllenM Guest

    Don't know what width or depth your talking on this creek, but look for them in slower water around lots of cover like the other posts say and you'll find them. I use just about the smallest hooks I can find at Walmart on an ultralight rig and 6 pound line.

    there is a good size, slow moving creek running into the Sacramento River off hwy 32 out here that I'm planning to put the boat out on this season, about 40 to 50 foot wide and I'd guess about 15-20 foot at its deepest. It's pretty choked with water hyacinth and lillies and I'll be trying my fly rod as well as the ultralight setup with about 12" between the hook and bobber. I figure on dropping a 1/4 of a crawler into the holes in the waterweeds where they'll likely be holding.