Credit Card Scams

Discussion in 'General Conversation' started by Coloman, Feb 7, 2006.

  1. Coloman

    Coloman New Member

    Messages:
    441
    State:
    Soddy Daisy, Tn
    SCENE 1. This is a new one.
    > A friend went to the local gym and placed his belongings in the
    >locker. After the workout and a shower, he came out, saw the locker
    >open, and thought to himself, "Funny, I thought I locked the locker.
    > Hmmmmm." He dressed and just flipped the wallet to make sure all
    was
    >in order. Everything looked okay - all cards were in place.
    >
    > A few weeks later his credit card bill came - a whooping bill of

    >$14,000!
    >
    > He called the credit card company and started yelling at them,
    saying
    >that he did not make the transactions. Customer care personnel verified

    >that there was no mistake in the system and asked if his card had been
    >stolen.
    >
    > "No," he said, but then took out his wallet, pulled out the
    credit
    >card, and yep - you guessed it - a switch had been made. An expired
    >similar credit card from the same bank was in the wallet. The thief
    >broke into his locker at the gym and switched cards.
    >
    > Verdict: The credit card issuer said since he did not report the
    card
    >missing earlier, he would have to pay the amount owed to them. How much

    >did he have to pay for items he did not buy? $9,000! Why were
    there
    >no calls made to verify the amount swiped? Small amounts rarely trigger

    >a "warning bell" with some credit card companies. It just so happens
    >that all the small amounts added up to big one!
    >
    > SCENE 2. A man at a local restaurant paid for his meal with his
    credit
    >card. The bill for the meal came, he signed it, and the waitress folded

    >the receipt and passed the credit card along.
    >
    > Usually, he would just take it and place it in his wallet or
    pocket.
    >Funny enough, though, he actually took a look at the card and, lo and
    >behold, it was the expired card of another person. He called the
    >waitress and she looked perplexed. She took it back, apologized, and
    >hurried back to the counter under the watchful eye of the man. All the
    >waitress did while walking to the counter was wave the wrong expired
    >card to the counter cashier, and the counter cashier immediately looked

    >down and took out the real card. No exchange of words --- nothing! She
    >took it and came back to the man with an apology.
    >
    > Verdict: Make sure the credit cards in your wallet is yours.
    >Check the name on the card every time you sign for something and/or the

    >card is taken away for even a short period of time. Many people just
    >take back the credit card without even looking at it, "assuming" that
    it
    >has to be theirs. FOR YOUR OWN SAKE, DEVELOP THE HABIT OF CHECKING YOUR

    >CREDIT CARD EACH TIME IT IS RETURNED TO YOU AFTER A TRANSACTION!
    >
    > SCENE 3: Yesterday I went into a pizza restaurant to pick up an
    order
    >that I had called in. I paid by using my Visa Check Card which,
    of
    >course, is linked directly to my checking account.
    >
    > The young man behind the counter took my card, swiped it, then
    laid it
    >on the counter as he waited for the approval, which is pretty standard
    >procedure. While he waited, he picked up his cell phone and started
    >dialing.
    >
    > I noticed the phone because it is the same model I have, but
    nothing
    >seemed out of the ordinary. Then I heard a click that sounded like my
    >phone sounds when I take a picture. He then gave me back my
    card
    >but kept the phone in his hand as if he was still pressing buttons.
    >Meanwhile, I'm thinking: I wonder what he is taking a picture of,
    >oblivious to what was really going on. It then dawned on me: the only
    >thing there was my credit card, so now I'm paying close attention to
    >what he is doing.
    >
    > He set his phone on the counter, leaving it open. About five
    seconds
    >later, I heard the chime that tells you that the picture has been
    >saved.
    >
    > Now I'm standing there struggling with the fact that this boy
    just
    >took a picture of my credit card. Yes, he played it off well, because
    >had we not had the same kind of phone, I probably would never have
    >known what happened. Needless to say, I immediately canceled that card

    >as I was walking out of the pizza parlor.
    >
    > All I am saying is, be aware of your surroundings at all times.
    >Whenever you are using your credit cards, take caution and don't be
    >careless. Notice who is standing near you and what they are doing when
    >you use your card. Be aware of phones because many have a camera phone
    >these days.
    >
    > When you are in a restaurant and the waiter/waitress brings your
    card
    >and receipt for you to sign, make sure you scratch the number off.
    >Some restaurants are using only the last four digits, but a lot of them

    >are still putting the whole thing on there. I have already been a
    victim
    >of credit card fraud and, believe me, it is not fun. The truth is that
    >they can get you even when you are careful, but don't make it easy for
    >them.
     
  2. truck

    truck New Member

    Messages:
    156
    State:
    williamsburg ohio
    There is a way around alot of that,it is called CASH;)
     

  3. Nobody Special

    Nobody Special New Member

    Messages:
    614
    State:
    TN
    I made the mistake of selling over $1,200 worth of high end Shimano reels by mail on a stolen credit card number. Guess who paid for it? Hint: It was not the person who the card was issued to and it certainly didn't cost the credit card company anything.
     
  4. james

    james New Member

    Messages:
    747
    State:
    Blue Ridge texa
    I only have one credit card and it stays put up not just to keep from getting stolen, mainly to keep me from useing it.
     
  5. fish

    fish Active Member

    Messages:
    1,573
    State:
    ChattanoogaTenn
    Thanks Bill, that is a real eye opener. The thieves just keep coming up with new ways of stealing all the time.
     
  6. Mutt

    Mutt Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Messages:
    18,459
    State:
    Ca
    Name:
    Mutt
    i think i would of said something to the kid taking the pic of my card would of yelled for the manager and made sure otehrs in the place heard me and what was going on. and i would of picked up his phone and looked to see that he did take a pic and if so id of called the police and had him arrested. about 5 years ago our credit card company called us to ask if we are making purches online in france and germany we said no needless to say we didnt have to pay for any of them how they got our credit card number is beyond me. but they ran up about 4k of items. this is why we do not and will not use a credit card online.
     
  7. Patmansc

    Patmansc Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,537
    State:
    Cordova, TN
    What a timley post! Yesterday one of my daughters called to tell me that someone had made $600 in charges on her credit card, which she still had in her possession. Seems like all of the charges were made on the internet, but in different countries. So there's definitely one or more new ways that numbers are being taken from cards. Man, it seems like there's more and more ways that we're being ripped off :mad:
     
  8. olefin

    olefin New Member

    Messages:
    3,908
    State:
    Texas
    The reality is that it's actually much safer to enter your credit card number on a secure online order form than it is to give your credit card to a waiter at a restaurant.

    Never provide your credit card information on a website that is not a secure site.

    By law, once you report the loss or theft, you have no further responsibility for unauthorized charges. In any event, your maximum liability under federal law is $50 per card. You are only responsible for the first $50 and most credit card companies will cover that for good customers.

    We've used a credit card for over 20 years and been making online purchases for the last 8 years... never a problem. Now days one can check their credit card charge purchases online.... my wife checks ours daily. Also Discover notifies us immediately if any unusual charges appear.

    With our all bills paid by bank transfers and using credit card we very seldom use cash or write checks.
     
  9. gater460

    gater460 New Member

    Messages:
    75
    State:
    eldon,mo
    olefin just because a web site says its secure how does a guy know for sure?
     
  10. olefin

    olefin New Member

    Messages:
    3,908
    State:
    Texas
    gater460,

    On my Firefox browser there will be a closed Lock displayed with the sites address, the lock and address background will be yellow. (see attachment)

    On MSIE browser the yellow closed lock will be displayed on the status bar at the bottom of the screen.

    Another item to check... on secure sites.... https://.
    Non-secure......http://.

    Never give any secure information such as credit card numbers unless you see the above.
     
  11. Deltalover

    Deltalover New Member

    Messages:
    1,227
    State:
    Tracy Calif
    I liked it better when you could trade two cows and a pig for a nice boat!:)