crappie brush piles

Discussion in 'Crappie Fishing' started by tufffish, Mar 16, 2008.

  1. tufffish

    tufffish New Member

    Messages:
    1,196
    State:
    Texas
    ok, i got all the christmas trees i collected tied into groups of 5. i am going to the lake this week to put them out. is it better to put them in 8 ft of water or do they need to be out in 12ft or more deep water. the 8 ft water has a few scattered trees in it and the 12 ft is pretty open water.
     
  2. BAM

    BAM New Member

    Messages:
    827
    State:
    Tennessee
    I would put them at varying depths, from 8 to 30 or so feet in the lake that I fish. Don't know your body of water so it would be hard to say exactly what depths would be best. But you do need to place them in varying depths, because the fish will move in the water column to the depth they are most comfortable or where the food is.
     

  3. jgoforthh

    jgoforthh New Member

    Messages:
    33
    State:
    kentucky
    i agree we put them all the way from 5 to about 30 to 35 foot of water. depending on the thermocline, water temp., current and alot of other factors they could be anywhere. also the time of year is a big fator. by spreading your trees out you will also have good habitat all year even the winter, and it MAY take a year for them to start using your trees. but it MAY NOT. happy fishing.
     
  4. Jiggin Boy

    Jiggin Boy New Member

    Messages:
    26
    State:
    Iowa
    Why not try putting them where there aint no trees there already. My buddy and i found a spot on a local lake that someone just shoved them through a 10inch hole in the ice and we had plenty of success. As long as theres structure.
     
  5. river scum

    river scum New Member

    Messages:
    3,474
    State:
    hooterville indiana
    i would say deeper also.
     
  6. mustad1

    mustad1 New Member

    Messages:
    44
    State:
    Iowa
    take the christmas trees and burn em. they are such soft wood they will be gone in just a few years. go on a road hunt and find cedar trees. they will last many more years. I just volunteered with the DNR last year to do some renovation on a lake that they had drawn down.
    If you do use
     
  7. mustad1

    mustad1 New Member

    Messages:
    44
    State:
    Iowa
    My dog just stepped on my keyboard and hit submit-sorry. what i started to say was, if you do use the christmas trees, leave the lights on em, makes em a lot easier to find!!!!!!
     
  8. tufffish

    tufffish New Member

    Messages:
    1,196
    State:
    Texas
    i am country and when i say christmas trees i mean cedar trees. i can get all the cedar i want and went around and picked up all i could find after christmas. i figured they need to be put to more use. i can say i have never bought one of those trees that come from a farm. we still have people that go out and cut cedar for christmas around here. thanks for the info as my son--in-law that lives near dallas was gonna collect the other kind of trees after this next christmas and i will tell him to just wait for me to bring cedar.
     
  9. Roadkillwarrior

    Roadkillwarrior New Member

    Messages:
    21
    State:
    Indiana
    Shallow would be good through spring but the fish may move to deeper water as the temp rises, I would spread them out instead of just making one big clump.
     
  10. orion_xxvx

    orion_xxvx New Member

    Messages:
    397
    State:
    North Central Missouri
    Cedar trees will work and will last forever but are somewhat caustic. If you really want good structure get a few hardwood trees and sink them. I like hard maples.
     
  11. DANZIG

    DANZIG New Member

    Messages:
    6,672
    State:
    West Virginia
  12. SkiMax

    SkiMax Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,012
    State:
    Rising Sun, IN
    The two main factors, I would say, to determine depths to sink them are water clarity and time of year you fish. First, if clear water you can sink them a little deeper. I have seen research that says crappie will spawn in 8-12 feet of water in clear lakes. So if the lake is clear you might need to go a little deeper. Also, if you know the main depth the crappie spawn at on your lake, going a couple feet deeper can improve your catch! If crappie spawn at 4 feet, 6-8 can (and usually will) hold bigger crappie. The males are usually the only ones that sit at the spawning depth, the bigger females usually sit a little ways out and only come in to drop eggs. This is something that your average crappie fisherman does not take into account. But I have fished a few crappie tournaments during the spawn and the winning teams almost always fish a few feet out from most the guys. Those guys will be hitting visible cover and the winning teams will key in on drops and ledges and such. You might not catch the numbers, but the quality will almost certainly be better!

    The other factor is time of year. Like some people have said, if you plan to fish in the winter, go deeper! Up tp 45-50 feet but I would stick to around 30-35. These can also be productive if your lake does not set up a big thermocline (being in Texas, it probably does).

    No matter what depth you decide to sink them, don't just do it randomly! Get a topo map, or use your depth finder and sink them along ditches, creek channels, points, etc. Crappie relate to trees but will pick ones that are on key bottom features first! Good luck and let us know how it does!
     
  13. n2fishn

    n2fishn New Member

    Messages:
    7,333
    State:
    Topeka,Kan
    Bobby the best i have found using cedar trees is to put them in 5 gallon buckets filled with concret and lower them down with a rope so they are standing straight up.
    This way if you have a 5-10' tree they will stack up and down the tree.
    Also on cedar's its best if you cut some of the branches off to kind of open it up some.
    Crappie tend to like it better that way so its not so thick.We will place four to six trees in one area like this and it works great here on our waters.