CPR question/thoughts...

Discussion in 'LOCAL MISSOURI TALK' started by grinnel, Aug 22, 2007.

  1. grinnel

    grinnel New Member

    Messages:
    28
    State:
    Pool 25, Mississippi MO
    I just got some bad news yesterday from a buddy who we turned a 56 lb flathead loose in his lake about a month ago. We caught the fish out of Mark Twain Lake, which is about 5 mile from his private lake. He has a stunted fish (crappie/bluegill) growth problem in his lake due to it being over populated and doesn't want any bass, so we figured a flathead of that size in a 8 acre lake might help clean it up a bit. When we caught the fish, we didn't have a big enough holding tank in the boat so we cut a small hole in its lip and tied it to a tree using a short piece of rope. Drove to the house a got a 300 gallon +/- watering trough and filled it full of lake water with two aerators. Drove back to MTL and went a picked the fish up. Transported it to my buddies lake with no problems. When I turned it loose the fish seemed fine. Minimal stress. This was on July the 15th if I remember. The farmer who lives there kept an eye out on his lake for the next two weeks and seen no sign of it dying.

    Jump ahead to yesterday.

    Got a phone call from my buddy and he found the fish floating along the bank dead. It must have just died as he said there was no sign of bloating and its eyes were still relatively clear. He said there was significant infection around the lip area where we had cut the hole for the stringer and he thought that was the culprit for its death.

    The reason I posed this question is that I've noticed in several of the pictures posted on here that folks have done the same thing we did with a rope through the lip. When you turn one loose in a river or large lake, odds are you're not going to know whether it makes it or not. Ideally, I would rather not make an incision in the fish, but when you don't have a large enough tank to hold it in, there aren't many other options.

    Just curious on what some others thoughts are the Subject.

    Thanks, Grinnel
     
  2. Dreadnaught

    Dreadnaught New Member

    Messages:
    5,444
    State:
    Henderson,Ky
    This is one of the main reasons I don't allow stringers in my tournaments. All fish caught in our tournaments are released after being weighed at the weigh-in. You can do everything possible to keep them healthy but, one never knows what happens to them down the line.
     

  3. theonecatfishbob

    theonecatfishbob New Member

    Messages:
    4,100
    State:
    Wright City, Missouri
    JW just made 1 mile of posts. Yak Yak Yak. I dont know if the stringer killed the fish. I wonder if the drastic change in habitat could have had something to do with it. I would think if the wound from the stringer killed it then a hook wound could do the same. Just fuel for thought people . Not saying the wound couldnt have caused it.
     
  4. Cuz

    Cuz New Member

    Messages:
    7,241
    State:
    DeSoto, MO
    Interesting story. Thanks for sharing. Makes you stop and think for sure. I dont use stringers either, but I release everything anyway. I dont think it was a bad decision to try and relocate the fish to your 8 acre lake. Flatheads are usually very hearty and do well in new impoundments provided the water is deep enough. The infected lip is perplexing. I wonder if their is any articles out there????????
     
  5. slider

    slider New Member

    Messages:
    581
    State:
    louisiana, mo
    i dont like to put big fish on a stringer do to the fact that they have alot more flesh to cut to make ahole to get your rope through
     
  6. crusinman2002

    crusinman2002 New Member

    Messages:
    374
    State:
    Mukwonago, Wisconsin
    i haven't ever had to transport a big fish like that, anything i catch that is over 10 pounds i cpr. when i do put a cat on a stringer its cause i'm plannin on keepin it and eatin it, but this is a really good question.

    with the overpopulation in the new pond, there is goin to be more bacteria in the water from all the extra waste, the water can handle it, but your flatty prolly got the infection from the new water with the new bacteria. there is bacteria in all water that breaks down the fish waste and ammonia and nitrates and nitrites that are caused from fish waste. and if the pond is on a farm, there is goin to be farm runoff which brings fertilizers into the water, which is something else the flatty prolly wasn't used to.

    i can't say if the infection killed the fish, or if the water killed the fish, as i'm not a bioligist, but the infection was a good point to bring up on here, cause noone really does know what will happen to that fish down the road after released.
     
  7. cubedweller

    cubedweller New Member

    Messages:
    454
    State:
    MO
    Is it even legal to stock a private pond with a public resource?
    I can't find a specific regulation on this but I can't imagine that it's a sanctioned practice.

    Regardless, I did manage to dig up a list of fish breeders who are probably capable of providing the fish your friend needs:
    http://mdc4.mdc.mo.gov/Documents/36.pdf
     
  8. metalman

    metalman Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,447
    State:
    IN
    Name:
    Winston
    Everyone should take note of this. Grinnel did the best he could do but the truth is that big fish are not as tough as people think.
    Sure they look tough and mean and capable of withstanding all kinds of duress but think about this:
    A big guy (person) is just as vulnerable to injury as a smaller person. Mix a bit of carbon monoxide in his air...he's going down. Lacerate his liver and he will bleed to death.
    TREAT THOSE FISH WITH GREAT CARE GUYS...W
     
  9. Cuz

    Cuz New Member

    Messages:
    7,241
    State:
    DeSoto, MO
    Good stuff Alex. Thx for the info.
     
  10. neocats

    neocats New Member

    Messages:
    2,130
    State:
    Steubenvil
    For just a 5 mile trip, you would have been better just to transport him real fast and release him. Flats are sturdy fish and the short trip probably would not have affected him like the hole in the mouth.
     
  11. grinnel

    grinnel New Member

    Messages:
    28
    State:
    Pool 25, Mississippi MO
    Thanks for the thoughts and opinions guys. I hate like hell that that fish died and we'd of never tried transporting it if we thought it wouldn't make it.

    I guess what got me thinking was, how many fish have not made it that have been turned loose in a river or large lake where you wouldn't know. I've turned loose every bluecat I've ever caught and most flatheads that went over 15 or 20 pounds, but they were all turned loose in the river or MTL. Of course you're always going to have a hole in the mouth from a hook, but I'll think twice from now on before putting a stringer on a fish that I'm ultimately going to turn loose. I realize there are a number of factors that could have caused it's death, but I really don't think stress was one of them. As for the lake the fish was turned loose in, its about a 6 year old lake, around 20' deep, and its entire watershed is in CRP which doesn't get sprayed with chemicals, so I don't think that could have been a factor. Besides, there are some big channels in the lake that push the upper teens and I would think you'd see some other fish kills if if chemicals were a problem.

    Again, thanks for the opinions. Great site!

    Grinnel
     
  12. theonecatfishbob

    theonecatfishbob New Member

    Messages:
    4,100
    State:
    Wright City, Missouri
    I am sure stress is a major factor. I have put fish in the livewell during a tournament and 5 minutes later they are floating sideways. There were no wounds other than the hook. It has to be stress. I have learned to play the fish more when I bring it in to help reduce the stress. Of course I dont think there is a sure fire way to stop the problem. Other than the unthinkable, stop fishing.
     
  13. Cattoo

    Cattoo New Member

    Messages:
    603
    State:
    caneyville,ky.
    i think the change in environment most likely had something to do with it. it could have been lack of oxygen or possibly a bacteria in the water that was not present in the fishes previous home.it could have caused the infection in the first place. but who really knows.
     
  14. dust777man

    dust777man New Member

    Messages:
    536
    State:
    SC
    Hate to hear that about that fish. There is a post on here somewhere about releasing fish after weigh ins at tournaments. The mortality rate is pretty high by the report. Hard to believe an incision into the mouth would kill a fish but there really isnt any other explanation. I have seen a few fish really bleed alot from a cut around their mouth.
     
  15. Malichi1970

    Malichi1970 New Member

    Messages:
    1,334
    State:
    Fenton, Missouri
    I would have to agree about the water being different and that having something to do with killing it. I have a small 1.5 acre pond near my house that I bring small cats home from the river and put them in and have never had a problem. Maybe the age of the fish coupled with the bacteria in the water caused it's eventual death.
     
  16. griz

    griz Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,744
    State:
    Murray Ky.
    Even with the best of care some fish don't make it. The former world record Bluecat (Splash) died from an infection in her jaw. Although it is not known for sure, the infection was believed to have been caused by the hook she was caught on.
    http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/newsmedia/releases/?req=20060918a