CPR Guys

Discussion in 'LOCAL ILLINOIS TALK' started by Branj796, Oct 20, 2009.

  1. Branj796

    Branj796 Member

    Messages:
    911
    State:
    Illinois
    Now I am not trying to start a bunch of stuff. I wanted to make this post so that cpr guys could get to know eachother and discuss what it is that makes them so adimant about catch and release. I am a cpr guy and it is not because I don't catch fish. I am an educated tournament fisherman that knows a lot about conservation, catfish, and the reproduction cycle of larger fish. Without larger fish there are no fish to spawn out and the larger and older fish produce more eggs which results in more catfish. I do not fish to eat. I fish because I love fishing. It was something that I turned to when I was young to help keep me out of trouble. I got away from it a couple years when I was a teenager and man did I screw up. I had nothing to keep me busy. Now for the past 5 years I have fished on average 4 times a week. I have not been in any trouble and this is due to the sport of catfishing. Therefor I will do whatever it takes to make sure that the sport of catfishing can survive the increased pressure from anglers. Some people have to catch and release or IT WILL HAVE A NEGATIVE EFFECT ON CATFISHING! That is a fact. Smaller fish can be stocked and farmed much easier than large ones. So I choose to only eat smaller fish. There have been new regulations put on the sport of catfishing in some states because it is important. Overfishing will someday ruin it for everyone. Others and myself do eat smaller fish but there is no need to eat a large catfish. It is full of chemicals and is not good for a person or for the reproduction of the fish. This is some but not all of the reason me and my buddies catch and release. I know some of you are gonna get on here and start a bunch of crap. This is not what this post is for. If you do not catch and release, please read what we write about why we practice this and maybe it will change your mind, maybe it wont. Just understand that it is important to some of us that these fish are caught and released so that your kid and his kid and so on will have the quality fishing and experiences that all of us have had. I am not trying to put non-cpr guys down at all so don't take it that way. I throw them back so they can be caught again that just what others and myself feel is right.
     
  2. fmb

    fmb New Member

    Messages:
    1,735
    State:
    Nebraska
    great thread.....

    I fish for food.....thats it....no sport to me...some people find that hard to belive but thats the truth....

    my family eats fish 2-3 times a week and store gotten catfish just don't do it for us....

    1 question I always think of is if comercial fisherman are taking large fish to sell to suppliers...do the supplier complain about the taste???? I have cleaned enuff large flatheads to know they all taste the same to me....

    I hope this info is taken in general form and not a personal attack...
     
    Last edited: Oct 20, 2009

  3. fmb

    fmb New Member

    Messages:
    1,735
    State:
    Nebraska
    [​IMG]1 catbuster [​IMG]
    Swordsman
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    dave
    Member Since: Jul 2009
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    [​IMG] hold on
    please do not respond to his new post in IL



    this was a pm sent to me....thought I would share it
     
  4. pendog66

    pendog66 New Member

    Messages:
    2,121
    State:
    Brookville OH
    good post. The reason the majority of us catfisherman in ohio are cpr is because we dont have the size of fisheries and fish in the state as you guys in missouri, mississippi, kentucky and so on. We have trotliners destroy our rivers and most of them illegally sell them to paylakes. Not to mention i read a report that every river in the country has mercury in it. As bottom feeders catfish will have the most mercury in their bodies and the larger fish have larger amounts of it in them. I already put enough bad things in my body and have no need to eat catfish. Im not knocking anyone that does it but enjoy what you have because most of us arent as lucky to have great fisheries around them.
     
  5. Branj796

    Branj796 Member

    Messages:
    911
    State:
    Illinois
    Who ever the guy was that sent that PM out is a real jerk. He doesn't know me and what difference does it make to him.
     
  6. pendog66

    pendog66 New Member

    Messages:
    2,121
    State:
    Brookville OH

    read the thread about the guys trotlining like 700 pounds of fish
     
  7. fmb

    fmb New Member

    Messages:
    1,735
    State:
    Nebraska
    his user name is 1 catbuster.....either way I have a right to post just like everyone else....
     
  8. fmb

    fmb New Member

    Messages:
    1,735
    State:
    Nebraska
    yea props to ya for a great thread.....

    thats just it we gotta seperate the personal attacks and the general information....

    I think a lot of cpr is where you live and what waters you fish......I lived in tennessee for 4 years and I released every fish I caught....

    here at home if I throw anything back it is wasted food....
     
  9. Catfish_Commando

    Catfish_Commando TF Staff Member

    Messages:
    7,005
    State:
    Georgia
  10. Branj796

    Branj796 Member

    Messages:
    911
    State:
    Illinois
    I know what you are saying but most of the lakes I fish are not commercially fished. I am talking about people taking a big fish, parading it around town, killing it, and then just throwing it away. If you are gonna eat it I have no problem with it. I support and have signed the petition but it does go beyond that to me. There definately needs to be laws but the mindset of some individuals needs to change. Anything that can be done to support the sport has my support.
     
  11. BIG_D

    BIG_D New Member

    Messages:
    8,107
    State:
    Batchtown IL.
    Jacob if a man eats a fish it is his right in my book but a man that just wants to show it off and lets it die or kills it and trashes it thats the man that pi$$es me off yes i am a CPR guy but i dont preach it much but the kinda man your talking about does get under my skin:angry: had my rant i feel much better now lol
     
  12. fmb

    fmb New Member

    Messages:
    1,735
    State:
    Nebraska
    if I ever see anyone wasting a fish....I would probally be in jail with assult charges pending

    there is no room for crap like that....
     
  13. flatheadslayer

    flatheadslayer New Member

    Messages:
    5,834
    State:
    Thomaston, Geor
    anyone that catches a fish and wastes it is not a fisherman,he's scum period.i keep and eat my share of fish.but i would never waste one.and the bigger ones i throw back 90% of the time.anyone that waste fish for no reason ain't worth wasting your breath on,no matter what you say it don't matter,their still scum.
     
  14. Branj796

    Branj796 Member

    Messages:
    911
    State:
    Illinois
    Man It has happened that I know of 5 times this year. Each fish was over 50 pounds. They were blues released into our lake to try to establish a population. They were even tagged. My buddy owns a bait shop and tells me the stories. He wont tell any of us who they are though. It has probably happened more than this. It is a damn shame.
     
  15. Branj796

    Branj796 Member

    Messages:
    911
    State:
    Illinois
    There were only about 300 introduced. Man if one of us would have caught them it would have gotten bucky wild. These fish were brought here by local anglers with permission from DNR. A lot of time and money went into it. You are all right, its a shame.
     
  16. Jeremy Sheffey

    Jeremy Sheffey New Member

    Messages:
    2,388
    State:
    Columbus, Ohio
    this is my take on CPR.

    If you need to eat fish to survive that is your right to catch and eat as many fish as you can do so legally. that being said if you fish to survive, you probably hunt to survive also. if you were to kill all of the deer out in your area, you would be going hungry, and you would notice a big change in how many you see on a daily bases. Same thing with fishing if you keep everything you catch and dont allow for some of the bigger fish to breed, you are going to see a big decrease in your catch. therefor a person that catches fish for food should do their best to make sure that they population can replenish itself fast enough or faster than what their food needs are. the best way to do that is to CPR all fish over 10-20 lbs. there are multiple studies out there that prove this point and it is common sense if you are willing to open your mind to the idea of what i am speaking. so if i was to need fish to eat, i would target the smaller fish for two basic reasons. #1 smaller fish are safer to eat, less mercury for one and all other dangerous chemicals that i wouldn't want my family to eat. #2 the larger fish (10+lbs) can repopulate the small fish year after year, making a strong and reliable food source.

    im not putting down those that keep fish, if you keep them for food then i support you and think it is your right. if you keep them to show off or sell them, but dont eat them then, well, the words i would say to you i can't print even in the HI section and i have already had one warning. my father and grandfather taught me a long time ago, and it is a good rule to live by. Don't kill it unless you are going to eat it. if everyone would live by those rules then there would be way less of a problem.

    personally i CPR almost every fish i catch. i say almost because when i trout fish for stocked trout i have been known to keep one or two for table fair that evening. CPR is the only way to ensure all fisheries survive to share with our children and grand children. So if you can CPR and if you are going to keep them only take what you can eat and let the rest swim to reproduce and provide you with more food another day.
     
  17. Branj796

    Branj796 Member

    Messages:
    911
    State:
    Illinois
    Well with all the stuff that flies over the CPR debate I expected a lot more people to chime in. Don't be shy read the first post and tells us how u feel and why you feel that way. No attacks just state your case. Maybe then we can all find a common ground. We as fisherman can make a difference and should.
     
  18. catinaldatime

    catinaldatime New Member

    Messages:
    384
    State:
    Girard, IL
    i just like to fish,everything i catch i throw back,BUT thats because im too dam lazy to take them home for a cleaning, i aint trying to carry home a 30 and 40 pound fish,i take the hook out and throw him back in the water and most of the time i dont have a camera to take a pic,if i tell the story and people dont belive it then who cares,i know i caught the fish.but dude,if anyone needs meat for there family i would never let an opinion about CPR keep me from feeding my family.thats why we have bodies of water on land,its basically yours, u buy a fishing ID and u can go out there in your boat any day of the week kick back and catch fish,Damn i got the fever!
     
  19. Branj796

    Branj796 Member

    Messages:
    911
    State:
    Illinois
    When we goin?
     
  20. catfisherman369

    catfisherman369 Floyd

    Messages:
    4,944
    State:
    Nashville Il.
    Catfish need the same regulations as other game fish. Catfish should not be sold, except by fish farmers. With catfish becoming such a sport fish I don't think they should be able to be taken by commercial fisherman at all . pay lakes should have to grow there own fish just like our trophy waters did. We are not doing enough to protect these fish.

    In 1992, the Missouri Department of Conservation banned commercial catfishing on the Missouri River. The ban was imposed out of concern that commercial anglers were catching too many big catfish. The department wanted to give recreational fishermen a better chance.

    Since the ban, the catch of flathead, channel and blue catfish increased at most points on the river. The biggest change noted was in the number and size of flathead catfish. The harvest of flatheads had more than doubled at some sites by 1998, and the fish that anglers caught were longer.

    Most anglers agreed the fishing had improved. In a Conservation Department survey, 87 percent of anglers knew about the commercial fishing ban, and 92 percent supported it. Of the anglers who fished the river prior to 1992, 77 percent said the angling had improved.

    In some states, catfish still are considered rough fish, and you can legally keep as many as you want – 10, 20,100, 500. Length limits are almost unheard of anywhere in the United States.

    Commercial fishing is also unregulated in many areas. On two of the country’s most famous trophy catfish lakes, for instance, commercial anglers are allowed to use trotlines to catch cats. As long as they buy the proper tags, each can use up to 2,000 hooks. It’s not unusual to see a commercial fisherman unloading a boat containing 100 or more catfish over 30 pounds.

    Unfortunately, facts such as these lead many anglers to believe that harvest restrictions are unnecessary. If the state says it’s OK, then there must be plenty of catfish to support such practices. And after all, excellent populations of catfish remain all around the country, even in many heavily fished waters. Why should we bother with restrictions?

    At one time, our country’s bass anglers were asking the same question. Most of them used hit-and-miss fishing tactics, just as most of today’s catfish anglers do. And bass seemed a limitless resource. How could we possibly hurt their numbers?

    Enter the modern age of bass fishing. Around the early 1970s, a wide variety of sophisticated fishing equipment suddenly became available to the average bass angler. They also were flooded with more and more information on how to catch bass – in magazines and books, on TV, on videos. All this enabled bass fishermen to become more skillful and efficient.

    As bassing became more and more popular, we learned that sport fishermen could adversely impact the quality of fishing by removing too many fish. Catch-and-release fishing, once scorned, quickly became the norm. Under pressure from sport fishermen, states started implementing more restrictive harvest regulations to protect and enhance our bass fisheries. Now it’s unusual to find a body of water that doesn’t have a variety of harvest restrictions – length limits, catch-and-release only, etc.

    Catfishing is now at a similar crossroads. The day is coming soon when many more catfishermen consistently catch more fish. With the rising popularity of the sport, and as catfishermen become more skillful and efficient, the need for voluntary and mandatory harvest restrictions will become more necessary. The question is, will fisheries managers and catfishermen apply the lessons learned with other fish before catfish populations are harmed?

    To a large extent, the answer to that question depends on you. Changes won’t be realized until catfishermen actively work to bring them about. You can help by contacting your elected and appointed representatives through letters, phone calls, e-mail or visits, and communicating your concerns. Let them know that catfish are more than rough fish. They’re among the most popular sport fish in the nation, and properly managed sport fisheries can generate millions of dollars for a state’s economy.

    Many catfish anglers believe it’s impossible to hurt a catfish population with hook and line. They’re wrong. Heavy angling pressure can have a dramatic effect on catfish populations if it’s not tempered by conservation. Big catfish are especially vulnerable, because once these ancients are removed, it takes years to replace them.

    Take flatheads, for instance. Even though they’re considered fast growing, in prime waters it takes 10 years for one to reach 30 pounds. The big ones – 60 pounds and up – are rare individuals that may have lived 30 years or more. Remove a trophy flathead from a river or lake, and it might be your elder. Chances are, it may not be replaced by a fish of similar size during your lifetime.

    Unfortunately, research indicates that flathead anglers release less than 2 percent of their
    catch. Increased fishing pressure combined with a “take-’em-home-and-eat-’em” philosophy is making big flatheads harder and harder to find in many waters.

    The same is true for channel and blue catfish. Trophy fish are old, uncommon fish. Yet many catfish anglers never consider releasing any of the fish they catch, especially big ones.

    As more and more anglers join the catfishing fraternity, it becomes increasingly important for us to be conservation-minded anglers. If we don’t, we may lose many of the outstanding trophy fisheries that now exist. But that doesn’t mean every catfish has to be released. If harvested wisely, there should be plenty of catfish to keep and eat. It’s important, however, that we’re selective about our harvest.

    Small cats are more numerous than big ones, so if you’re fish hungry, keep some of the smaller guys to eat. Try to resist the temptation to keep the big heavyweights. Shoot some photos for memory’s sake, then carefully release the fish. Voluntary catch-and-release is a good way to protect and perpetuate our outstanding trophy catfishing opportunities.

    Be sure to do it right. Catfish are extremely hardy. An individual may live for hours out of the water. But if you expect a cat to survive following release, it’s important to handle it properly. Follow these simple tips, and you can greatly increase the chances the fish you turn back lives to be caught again.

    Use barbless hooks, or crimp the barbs with pliers.

    Bring the fish to the boat quickly; don’t play it to total exhaustion while attempting to land it.

    Hold the fish in the water as much as possible when handling it, removing the hook and preparing it for release.

    Wet your hands before handling the fish to avoid removing its protective slime layer.

    If the fish has swallowed the hook, don’t pull it out. Rather, cut the line as close to the hook as possible, leaving it inside the fish.

    Don’t squeeze the fish or put your fingers in its gills. Cradle it in the water and move it back and forth to oxygenate the gills. When the fish is properly rested, it will swim from your hands.

    Catfishermen have other obligations, too. It’s important that we all work together to keep our lakes and rivers clean.

    Show respect and consideration for other people who use those resources. We need to set a good example for others to follow, and leave positive images of catfishermen for those who don’t fish or who fish for other species. Here are some tips that may help.

    Read your local fishing regulations booklet cover to cover this year, and stick by the rules – all the rules – year-round. Obtain the proper licenses. Obey creel and possession limits. Use only legal equipment and methods of harvest.

    If you fish with jugs, trotlines, limblines or yo-yos, take them with you when you leave. These items are a major form of unsightly garbage on our nation’s catfishing waters and can be extremely dangerous to boaters, swimmers and wildlife.

    Properly dispose of used fishing line. Thousands of animals die yearly after becoming entangled in carelessly discarded line. Other trash is unsightly and sometimes dangerous, too – bait boxes, minnow bags, hook containers, broken bobbers, drink cans and leftover pieces of cut-bait. Don’t drop any trash in the water or on shore. Take it with you for proper disposal at home.

    Avoid purposely introducing catfish in public waters where they aren’t native. And don’t discard unused live bait in the waters you fish. If an unwanted species gains a foothold, it can wreak havoc on natural ecosystems.

    When wading, disturb the streambed as little as possible to protect the delicate habitats there.

    Avoid spilling fuel and oil when filling your motor. These chemicals are deadly to aquatic life.

    Discuss the importance of being a responsible angler with your sons and daughters who fish. Explain your personal code of ethics, and encourage them to “do the right thing” when enjoying the outdoors.

    By following these principles of conduct each time you go fishing, you give your best to the sport, the public, the environment and yourself. And believe it or not, actions really do speak louder than words.

    We should all work together to conserve this precious resource. If we don’t, that which we take for granted may someday be gone.

    You can voice your opinion and belief on this subject at catfishrescue.com